Areyiah2912
My 8 month baby wont sleep in crib or take formula I'm tired of breastfeeding and exhausted
October 12, 2012 at 4:20 PM
My baby girl is too attached she doesn't do well in crib if i leave room and I'm not able to take time away because I'm also breastfeeding. I never thought I'd go this long. Yes it's great for the baby but I want to start working and going back to school and having date night...if I put my milk into a bottle she just plays with it and is smart enough to know that it's not the real thing so please help what can I do?

Replies

  • jakesmom323
    October 12, 2012 at 9:13 PM
    1st of all you are talking to someone that had severe mastitis that resulted in a serious surgery and home health for months with my first baby. So I'm debunking your "proof". Your like the State Farm commercial that because it's on the Internet, it must be true. 2nd I personally have an abundant amounts of milk. I actually over produce. My child is very healthy at 8 weeks and gets plenty of milk. So for people not educated in nipple gaurds, your talking to a 32 yr old, college graduate, that uses nipple guards. Just sterilize/disinfect them and it's a great way to get your baby to use a bottle, because they are used to the nipple.


    Quoting KylersMom8-16-7:

    Nipple shields aren't probably the best idea.



    From Kellymom.com:



    Disadvantages to using a nipple shield



    Disadvantages to the nipple shield include:



    Baby may get less milk if the shield is used incorrectly



    Mom may be more at risk for plugged ducts and mastitis (if the shield causes reduced milk transfer)



    It can be difficult to wean from the shield



    What precautions should be taken when using a nipple shield?



    Here are a couple of things to keep an eye on until baby is weaned from the shield. By following through with the precautions that outlined below, you should be able to avoid or head off any problems:



    When using a shield you’ll need to carefully assess your baby for adequate intake (see links below). Count his wet diapers every day and make sure that he’s having at least 6 really wet ones each 24 hour period. You also will want to make sure that he stools at least twice daily if he is less than 5-6 weeks of age. After 5-6 weeks, his stools may only come every few days, but should still be loose and profuse if many days have passed. Baby will also need to be weighed frequently – at least every 2 weeks (make sure you use the same scale) – until it is clear that he is gaining well.



    You will also want to listen for frequent swallowing during the feeding and feel for overall good breast softening after the feeding. If your breasts are not well-softened after each feeding, you may need to pump until they are softened to ensure that your supply remains adequate. This will lessen your risk for plugged ducts and help to maintain your supply.






    Quoting jakesmom323:

    Use nipple guards while breast feeding, then the bottle is an easy transition. It works for me;) If she doesn't like the formula, maybe switch formulas. As far as the crib situation, it will be hard for a while. I still have a 2.5 yr old that sneaks in my bed every other night. These are some ideas, and good luck:)


  • MommyO2-6631
    October 12, 2012 at 9:21 PM
    Formula probably won't help. She is at the prime age for seperation anxiety
  • Baby_Avas_Momma
    October 12, 2012 at 9:23 PM
    This!


    Quoting melindabelcher:

    If you want to go out/school l/work etc just leave the bottle and your milk. Baby won't starve, if hes hungry he'll take it.

    Method of feeding doesn't determine personality. You can have a clingy formula fed baby or independent breastfed baby.

    Go out, enjoy, have a drink if you want. Breastfeeding doesn't mean your stuck home with baby 24/7
  • Baby_Avas_Momma
    October 12, 2012 at 9:27 PM
    She provided best practice advice. What worked for you, does not work for most moms. That's all mama. :)

    Quoting jakesmom323:

    1st of all you are talking to someone that had severe mastitis that resulted in a serious surgery and home health for months with my first baby. So I'm debunking your "proof". Your like the State Farm commercial that because it's on the Internet, it must be true. 2nd I personally have an abundant amounts of milk. I actually over produce. My child is very healthy at 8 weeks and gets plenty of milk. So for people not educated in nipple gaurds, your talking to a 32 yr old, college graduate, that uses nipple guards. Just sterilize/disinfect them and it's a great way to get your baby to use a bottle, because they are used to the nipple.




    Quoting KylersMom8-16-7:

    Nipple shields aren't probably the best idea.





    From Kellymom.com:





    Disadvantages to using a nipple shield





    Disadvantages to the nipple shield include:





    Baby may get less milk if the shield is used incorrectly





    Mom may be more at risk for plugged ducts and mastitis (if the shield causes reduced milk transfer)





    It can be difficult to wean from the shield





    What precautions should be taken when using a nipple shield?





    Here are a couple of things to keep an eye on until baby is weaned from the shield. By following through with the precautions that outlined below, you should be able to avoid or head off any problems:





    When using a shield you’ll need to carefully assess your baby for adequate intake (see links below). Count his wet diapers every day and make sure that he’s having at least 6 really wet ones each 24 hour period. You also will want to make sure that he stools at least twice daily if he is less than 5-6 weeks of age. After 5-6 weeks, his stools may only come every few days, but should still be loose and profuse if many days have passed. Baby will also need to be weighed frequently – at least every 2 weeks (make sure you use the same scale) – until it is clear that he is gaining well.





    You will also want to listen for frequent swallowing during the feeding and feel for overall good breast softening after the feeding. If your breasts are not well-softened after each feeding, you may need to pump until they are softened to ensure that your supply remains adequate. This will lessen your risk for plugged ducts and help to maintain your supply.









    Quoting jakesmom323:

    Use nipple guards while breast feeding, then the bottle is an easy transition. It works for me;) If she doesn't like the formula, maybe switch formulas. As far as the crib situation, it will be hard for a while. I still have a 2.5 yr old that sneaks in my bed every other night. These are some ideas, and good luck:)


  • KylersMom8-16-7
    October 12, 2012 at 9:41 PM
    First off Miss 32 year old, nipple shield using, college graduate don't get all bitchy.

    Second Kellymom is a very reliable site run by a IBCLC (International Board Certified Lactation Consultant) all information found on her site is backed by studies.

    Nipple shields are not meant for long term use in most cases.

    http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/child/wean-shield/


    Quoting jakesmom323:

    1st of all you are talking to someone that had severe mastitis that resulted in a serious surgery and home health for months with my first baby. So I'm debunking your "proof". Your like the State Farm commercial that because it's on the Internet, it must be true. 2nd I personally have an abundant amounts of milk. I actually over produce. My child is very healthy at 8 weeks and gets plenty of milk. So for people not educated in nipple gaurds, your talking to a 32 yr old, college graduate, that uses nipple guards. Just sterilize/disinfect them and it's a great way to get your baby to use a bottle, because they are used to the nipple.




    Quoting KylersMom8-16-7:

    Nipple shields aren't probably the best idea.





    From Kellymom.com:





    Disadvantages to using a nipple shield





    Disadvantages to the nipple shield include:





    Baby may get less milk if the shield is used incorrectly





    Mom may be more at risk for plugged ducts and mastitis (if the shield causes reduced milk transfer)





    It can be difficult to wean from the shield





    What precautions should be taken when using a nipple shield?





    Here are a couple of things to keep an eye on until baby is weaned from the shield. By following through with the precautions that outlined below, you should be able to avoid or head off any problems:





    When using a shield you’ll need to carefully assess your baby for adequate intake (see links below). Count his wet diapers every day and make sure that he’s having at least 6 really wet ones each 24 hour period. You also will want to make sure that he stools at least twice daily if he is less than 5-6 weeks of age. After 5-6 weeks, his stools may only come every few days, but should still be loose and profuse if many days have passed. Baby will also need to be weighed frequently – at least every 2 weeks (make sure you use the same scale) – until it is clear that he is gaining well.





    You will also want to listen for frequent swallowing during the feeding and feel for overall good breast softening after the feeding. If your breasts are not well-softened after each feeding, you may need to pump until they are softened to ensure that your supply remains adequate. This will lessen your risk for plugged ducts and help to maintain your supply.









    Quoting jakesmom323:

    Use nipple guards while breast feeding, then the bottle is an easy transition. It works for me;) If she doesn't like the formula, maybe switch formulas. As far as the crib situation, it will be hard for a while. I still have a 2.5 yr old that sneaks in my bed every other night. These are some ideas, and good luck:)



  • pittymama
    October 12, 2012 at 11:21 PM

    i agree with others about scheduling around feeding schedule. i won't go grocery shopping unless i know DD has been fed recently. may i ask why you're trying to supplement formula? you could just pump that way baby is still getting breastmilk. are you clossing and trying to get her to sleep in her crib over night? if you've been cosleeping a long time, it can take a lot longer to wean baby to sleep in their own crib. i didn't cosleep and the transition from the rock n play to the crib took time so i'm sure if she's more attached and used to your comfort, it can take a really long time. be patient and maybe talk to your pediatrician for some advice. 

  • merryvoice
    October 14, 2012 at 5:22 AM
    Have you tried different nipples? Mine is really picky about the types of nipples she'll use.
  • IrishIz
    by IrishIz
    October 14, 2012 at 11:56 AM

    Wow.  Just because you had success with them does not mean that this is the norm.  The fact that you are a 32 year old college graduate doesn't mean you know squat about breastfeeding.  I know plenty of college graduates who are complete morons.  I'm not sure why you would throw that in some-body's face.  Your post was quite rude.

    You had success with a nipple shield.  That's great.  You alone does not disprove years of research...you should know that as a college graduate.  

    So this 36 year old college graduate and RN and breastfeeding specialist (waiting on results of the IBCLC exam) will tell you that you are wrong and if we are going to pull education cards...mine trumps yours.

    I'm glad you had success but your post was rude.  Your idea that your success disproves facts is wrong.



    Quoting jakesmom323:

    1st of all you are talking to someone that had severe mastitis that resulted in a serious surgery and home health for months with my first baby. So I'm debunking your "proof". Your like the State Farm commercial that because it's on the Internet, it must be true. 2nd I personally have an abundant amounts of milk. I actually over produce. My child is very healthy at 8 weeks and gets plenty of milk. So for people not educated in nipple gaurds, your talking to a 32 yr old, college graduate, that uses nipple guards. Just sterilize/disinfect them and it's a great way to get your baby to use a bottle, because they are used to the nipple.


    Quoting KylersMom8-16-7:

    Nipple shields aren't probably the best idea.



    From Kellymom.com:



    Disadvantages to using a nipple shield



    Disadvantages to the nipple shield include:



    Baby may get less milk if the shield is used incorrectly



    Mom may be more at risk for plugged ducts and mastitis (if the shield causes reduced milk transfer)



    It can be difficult to wean from the shield



    What precautions should be taken when using a nipple shield?



    Here are a couple of things to keep an eye on until baby is weaned from the shield. By following through with the precautions that outlined below, you should be able to avoid or head off any problems:



    When using a shield you’ll need to carefully assess your baby for adequate intake (see links below). Count his wet diapers every day and make sure that he’s having at least 6 really wet ones each 24 hour period. You also will want to make sure that he stools at least twice daily if he is less than 5-6 weeks of age. After 5-6 weeks, his stools may only come every few days, but should still be loose and profuse if many days have passed. Baby will also need to be weighed frequently – at least every 2 weeks (make sure you use the same scale) – until it is clear that he is gaining well.



    You will also want to listen for frequent swallowing during the feeding and feel for overall good breast softening after the feeding. If your breasts are not well-softened after each feeding, you may need to pump until they are softened to ensure that your supply remains adequate. This will lessen your risk for plugged ducts and help to maintain your supply.






    Quoting jakesmom323:

    Use nipple guards while breast feeding, then the bottle is an easy transition. It works for me;) If she doesn't like the formula, maybe switch formulas. As far as the crib situation, it will be hard for a while. I still have a 2.5 yr old that sneaks in my bed every other night. These are some ideas, and good luck:)



  • jakesmom323
    October 14, 2012 at 4:46 PM
    Yeah, I was rude. I own it and I don't care what you say.


    Quoting IrishIz:

    Wow.  Just because you had success with them does not mean that this is the norm.  The fact that you are a 32 year old college graduate doesn't mean you know squat about breastfeeding.  I know plenty of college graduates who are complete morons.  I'm not sure why you would throw that in some-body's face.  Your post was quite rude.

    You had success with a nipple shield.  That's great.  You alone does not disprove years of research...you should know that as a college graduate.  

    So this 36 year old college graduate and RN and breastfeeding specialist (waiting on results of the IBCLC exam) will tell you that you are wrong and if we are going to pull education cards...mine trumps yours.

    I'm glad you had success but your post was rude.  Your idea that your success disproves facts is wrong.



    Quoting jakesmom323:

    1st of all you are talking to someone that had severe mastitis that resulted in a serious surgery and home health for months with my first baby. So I'm debunking your "proof". Your like the State Farm commercial that because it's on the Internet, it must be true. 2nd I personally have an abundant amounts of milk. I actually over produce. My child is very healthy at 8 weeks and gets plenty of milk. So for people not educated in nipple gaurds, your talking to a 32 yr old, college graduate, that uses nipple guards. Just sterilize/disinfect them and it's a great way to get your baby to use a bottle, because they are used to the nipple.





    Quoting KylersMom8-16-7:

    Nipple shields aren't probably the best idea.





    From Kellymom.com:





    Disadvantages to using a nipple shield





    Disadvantages to the nipple shield include:





    Baby may get less milk if the shield is used incorrectly





    Mom may be more at risk for plugged ducts and mastitis (if the shield causes reduced milk transfer)





    It can be difficult to wean from the shield





    What precautions should be taken when using a nipple shield?





    Here are a couple of things to keep an eye on until baby is weaned from the shield. By following through with the precautions that outlined below, you should be able to avoid or head off any problems:





    When using a shield you’ll need to carefully assess your baby for adequate intake (see links below). Count his wet diapers every day and make sure that he’s having at least 6 really wet ones each 24 hour period. You also will want to make sure that he stools at least twice daily if he is less than 5-6 weeks of age. After 5-6 weeks, his stools may only come every few days, but should still be loose and profuse if many days have passed. Baby will also need to be weighed frequently – at least every 2 weeks (make sure you use the same scale) – until it is clear that he is gaining well.





    You will also want to listen for frequent swallowing during the feeding and feel for overall good breast softening after the feeding. If your breasts are not well-softened after each feeding, you may need to pump until they are softened to ensure that your supply remains adequate. This will lessen your risk for plugged ducts and help to maintain your supply.










    Quoting jakesmom323:

    Use nipple guards while breast feeding, then the bottle is an easy transition. It works for me;) If she doesn't like the formula, maybe switch formulas. As far as the crib situation, it will be hard for a while. I still have a 2.5 yr old that sneaks in my bed every other night. These are some ideas, and good luck:)






  • IrishIz
    by IrishIz
    October 15, 2012 at 10:01 AM

    Wow...are you proud of yourself for being rude or were you just having a bad day?  You don't have to care what I say as my life will go on.  I'm just going to say that maybe you need a break if being rude is okay with you.

    Quoting jakesmom323:

    Yeah, I was rude. I own it and I don't care what you say.


    Quoting IrishIz:

    Wow.  Just because you had success with them does not mean that this is the norm.  The fact that you are a 32 year old college graduate doesn't mean you know squat about breastfeeding.  I know plenty of college graduates who are complete morons.  I'm not sure why you would throw that in some-body's face.  Your post was quite rude.

    You had success with a nipple shield.  That's great.  You alone does not disprove years of research...you should know that as a college graduate.  

    So this 36 year old college graduate and RN and breastfeeding specialist (waiting on results of the IBCLC exam) will tell you that you are wrong and if we are going to pull education cards...mine trumps yours.

    I'm glad you had success but your post was rude.  Your idea that your success disproves facts is wrong.



    Quoting jakesmom323:

    1st of all you are talking to someone that had severe mastitis that resulted in a serious surgery and home health for months with my first baby. So I'm debunking your "proof". Your like the State Farm commercial that because it's on the Internet, it must be true. 2nd I personally have an abundant amounts of milk. I actually over produce. My child is very healthy at 8 weeks and gets plenty of milk. So for people not educated in nipple gaurds, your talking to a 32 yr old, college graduate, that uses nipple guards. Just sterilize/disinfect them and it's a great way to get your baby to use a bottle, because they are used to the nipple.





    Quoting KylersMom8-16-7:

    Nipple shields aren't probably the best idea.





    From Kellymom.com:





    Disadvantages to using a nipple shield





    Disadvantages to the nipple shield include:





    Baby may get less milk if the shield is used incorrectly





    Mom may be more at risk for plugged ducts and mastitis (if the shield causes reduced milk transfer)





    It can be difficult to wean from the shield





    What precautions should be taken when using a nipple shield?





    Here are a couple of things to keep an eye on until baby is weaned from the shield. By following through with the precautions that outlined below, you should be able to avoid or head off any problems:





    When using a shield you’ll need to carefully assess your baby for adequate intake (see links below). Count his wet diapers every day and make sure that he’s having at least 6 really wet ones each 24 hour period. You also will want to make sure that he stools at least twice daily if he is less than 5-6 weeks of age. After 5-6 weeks, his stools may only come every few days, but should still be loose and profuse if many days have passed. Baby will also need to be weighed frequently – at least every 2 weeks (make sure you use the same scale) – until it is clear that he is gaining well.





    You will also want to listen for frequent swallowing during the feeding and feel for overall good breast softening after the feeding. If your breasts are not well-softened after each feeding, you may need to pump until they are softened to ensure that your supply remains adequate. This will lessen your risk for plugged ducts and help to maintain your supply.










    Quoting jakesmom323:

    Use nipple guards while breast feeding, then the bottle is an easy transition. It works for me;) If she doesn't like the formula, maybe switch formulas. As far as the crib situation, it will be hard for a while. I still have a 2.5 yr old that sneaks in my bed every other night. These are some ideas, and good luck:)







Active Posts in All Groups
More Active Posts
Featured Posts in All Groups
More Featured Posts