Advice for Moms

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jstone76
Need help with my son who has ADD, please!
December 7, 2012 at 11:31 AM

Hi My name is Jessica. I have an 8yr old son that has Add for a couple years now. What are some ways i can help him when his medicine is wearing off and he still has homework to get done? Also he craves the routine I try to keep and if something happens that doesn't usually happen it throws him off and I have a hard time getting him to talk about it and realize that things don't always go the way you want them to? Thanks in advance for any tips you can offer.

Replies

  • kidkrazyinAK
    December 7, 2012 at 12:04 PM

    You can get a short acting ritalin to cover those hours, or you can try caffiene. The caffiene works for my DD. It does not have to be coffee or a red bull...I use Mio energy drops, I can control how strong it is and it tastes beter than red bull.

  • kirbymom
    December 7, 2012 at 1:11 PM

    Welcome Jessica. :)   How much of a routine does he have. Can you help him focus by reminding him of what he needs to finish or if he is done and needs to move on to the next activity or school subject or chore? Sometimes kids with ADD just need a push and or a reminder of what comes next on their to do list. You are just going to have to know that you will be reminding him of what he needs to do throughout his day.  You might try taping small typed out schedules to his bedroom door, the bathroom door the refrigerator etc etc. Places he sees and can be reminded of what he needs to do and when to do it.  

  • LindaClement
    December 7, 2012 at 2:33 PM

    Turn off all the electronics and noise makers in the house. They're made to be distracting and they really, really work.

    While he's doing his homework, it can help him learn to focus if you don't do anything else. I don't mean that you should do homework with him or for him, just that you be silently present, watching him.

  • ONA7DAY
    by ONA7DAY
    December 7, 2012 at 2:46 PM

     Have you looked into Natural Home Remedy type stuff for ADD?

  • Jess0915
    December 7, 2012 at 3:39 PM

    Hi Jessica, I'm Jessica too! My DD is ADHD and was diagnosed at 3, she was really bad. The meds never really worked very well for her, so I took a med free route. It wasn't easy, but I can tell you some things that helped us.

    1. No sugar. Sugar was a very rare treat, like birthdays and holidays. Fruit was okay, but no candy, sweet cereals, soda, etc.

    2. Very strict schedule, where she got to put stickers when she completed daily tasks (when she was 4 we started this).

    3. No food with red dye in it, sounds funny, but her doctor told me they have found links to red food coloring and triggers in ADD/ADHD.

    4. Physical activity. Playing outside every day that weather permitted. We even kept our living room free of furniture so she could play and run in the room with nothing in the way. All our furniture was moved to the den. She also participated in any sport she was interested in, Cheer, tumbling, dance, soccer. She was so busy, but it helped SO MUCH!

    5. Consistency. Much harder than it sounds with an ADHD kid, but she craved consistency and behaved much better when I was consistent.

    6. When she misbehaved I would put her in her room without her favorite toys, no tv, no fun activities. Just time to think and told her when she was ready to behave, she could call for me and I'd come in and talk with her. We had many many talks.

    7. Whenever she had to do busy work, or boring stuff (aka homework), I'd set a timer and she'd have to sit and do work until the timer went off. Usually around 5-10 minutes (it got longer as she got older). When the timer went off, she was free to get up and do something else for a few minutes, I set a timer for that too. Usually I'd send her outside to burn off some energy on the trampoline, or practice her tumbling. Then she'd come back and work. If she had work in more than one subject I would switch back and forth between subjects to keep her busy without letting her get bored.

    She's 14 now and she is able to set her own schedule now (excluding school of course), and she has much more control over her emotions and impulses. In the end I'm glad we took the route we did because I see her now and I'm happy that she's not dependant on meds to get things done. Not the right choice for everyone, but it definitely was for us.

    I will also add that I have ADD as well, and many of these things work wonders for me too. :)

  • la_bella_vita
    December 7, 2012 at 4:16 PM

     The only thing I can think of it to cut out/limit caffeine and sugar.

  • Aishamusty
    December 7, 2012 at 4:22 PM

    BUMP!

  • DaniandTom
    December 8, 2012 at 12:31 PM

    I battled this with my oldest and I feel for you! It's frustrating to try to get things regulated and I can imagine it's even more so with a child who needs the routine as much as yours. Ask your doctor about maybe giving him his medication later in the day--like just before lunch--so that there is still some in his system for homework time. Also you might talk to his teachers about lessening the load for him--keep homework at a minimum so he doesn't have that lag between the end of homework and the time his meds run out. You could also talk to your pediatrician about perhaps adding a small dose for homework--maybe a half or even a quarter of the full dosage.
    Barring that, let him do his homework in spurts. Say 10-15 minutes at a time. That way you can remind him "Just 7 more minutes and you can take a break" so he can try to focus. That worked well with my son but we also had an "optional" small dosage of his meds for days when he had a lot to get done or had a test coming up he needed to study for. Hope that helps! ♥Hugs♥

  • CoeyG
    by CoeyG
    December 8, 2012 at 4:23 PM


    Quoting Jess0915:

    Hi Jessica, I'm Jessica too! My DD is ADHD and was diagnosed at 3, she was really bad. The meds never really worked very well for her, so I took a med free route. It wasn't easy, but I can tell you some things that helped us.

    1. No sugar. Sugar was a very rare treat, like birthdays and holidays. Fruit was okay, but no candy, sweet cereals, soda, etc.

    2. Very strict schedule, where she got to put stickers when she completed daily tasks (when she was 4 we started this).

    3. No food with red dye in it, sounds funny, but her doctor told me they have found links to red food coloring and triggers in ADD/ADHD.

    4. Physical activity. Playing outside every day that weather permitted. We even kept our living room free of furniture so she could play and run in the room with nothing in the way. All our furniture was moved to the den. She also participated in any sport she was interested in, Cheer, tumbling, dance, soccer. She was so busy, but it helped SO MUCH!

    5. Consistency. Much harder than it sounds with an ADHD kid, but she craved consistency and behaved much better when I was consistent.

    6. When she misbehaved I would put her in her room without her favorite toys, no tv, no fun activities. Just time to think and told her when she was ready to behave, she could call for me and I'd come in and talk with her. We had many many talks.

    7. Whenever she had to do busy work, or boring stuff (aka homework), I'd set a timer and she'd have to sit and do work until the timer went off. Usually around 5-10 minutes (it got longer as she got older). When the timer went off, she was free to get up and do something else for a few minutes, I set a timer for that too. Usually I'd send her outside to burn off some energy on the trampoline, or practice her tumbling. Then she'd come back and work. If she had work in more than one subject I would switch back and forth between subjects to keep her busy without letting her get bored.

    She's 14 now and she is able to set her own schedule now (excluding school of course), and she has much more control over her emotions and impulses. In the end I'm glad we took the route we did because I see her now and I'm happy that she's not dependant on meds to get things done. Not the right choice for everyone, but it definitely was for us.

    I will also add that I have ADD as well, and many of these things work wonders for me too. :)

    I applaud your methods, especially taking breaks while doing homework.  That would not only work for ADHD children but "normal" as well.  When my daughter got home from school I gave her a few minutes to "unwind" then she would begin on homework.  After about 15 minutes I'd give her a break.  Here is a trick.  Don't make your kids correct their mistakes in homework.  That is the teacher's job and when they make mistakes they are showing the teacher what part of her lessons the child is retaining.  Better teachers figure that if the child shows a consistant error pattern in a subject that mybe it can be taught a little differntly. 

  • tyfry7496
    December 8, 2012 at 4:49 PM
    A few ounces of straight, strong black coffee will help as will Mt Dew. The caffeine will help your child calm down and focus. Caffeine has the opposite affect on kids with ADD. I find that I can concentrate better with music playing or the tv on in the background, it forces the brain to focus on the task at hand. Works for my son too and was recommended by numerous mental health professionals that work with kids with ADD/ADHD. You could also consult the doctor about different meds or adding a small dose of fast acting meds like Ritalin.

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