Advice for Moms

vinalex0581
Is it normal now a days for pedis to give Hepititas B shots to infants?
October 8, 2012 at 8:41 PM

So the other day, my parents came over to hang with us. My SO mentioned how Sam (our 3 month old) received shots on the 28th of September (just so happened to be when he turned 3 months).

My SO was listing off the type of shots Sam received and one of them was the Hepititas B shot.

My parents started telling us how they shouldn't have given that to Sam. How it's not healthy to give to infants and they inject a little of the Hep B in babies which means that it's in their system which means that they now have Hep B which means that they can get sick from it.

We told them that I don't think that the doctors would give him something if they knew it was harmful to the baby.

My mom told me to do some research on it to see if it's safe or not.

Sam gets a series of shots (which most infants get) and the next sets of shots he receives is when he's 6 months old, I think.

My question is is this normal? I'm asking you because my parents are over protective when it comes to their grandchildren so they tend to over react to things that may seem minor.

When he goes for his next shots should I tell his doctor that I don't want him to get the Hep B shots or is it to late to deny the shots because the Hep B is all ready in his system?

Replies

  • SewingMamaLele
    October 9, 2012 at 2:23 PM

    Easy to be exposed to from where?   It's not airborne... you have to be exposed through direct bodily fluids... via sex, blood transfusion, etc...

    Quoting Mommy2b2324:

    I didn't say among preschoolers. In general it's easy to be exposed to it and become sick. Otherwise it wouldn't be included in sets of shots especially for such young children


    Quoting emmy526:

    Hep B a prevalent illness amongst preschoolers? Please elaborate and share any links you have which have credible references.  I have yet to read about this being a problem amongst that age bracket.  


    Quoting Mommy2b2324:

    Its standard in infant vaccs. My oldest is 4learning and he has received it as have my younger two children. Its still a very prevalent illness and the little ones need early prevention protection




  • emmy526
    by emmy526
    October 9, 2012 at 6:06 PM

    so, tell me again how easy it is for a child to contract this considering these transmission routes

    The hepatitis B virus is known as a blood-borne virus because it is transmitted from one person to another via blood or fluids contaminated with blood. Another important route of transmission is from an infected mother to a newborn child, which occurs during or shortly after birth.

    • Direct contract with blood may occur through the use of dirty needles during illicit drug use, inadvertent needle sticks experienced by healthcare workers, or contact with blood through other means. Semen, which contain small amounts of blood, and saliva that is contaminated with blood also carry the virus. 

    • The virus may be transmitted when these fluids come in contact with broken skin or a mucous membrane (in the mouth, genital organs, or rectum) of an uninfected person.

    People who are at an increased risk of being infected with the hepatitis B virus include the following:

    • Men or women who have multiple sex partners, especially if they don't use a condom

    • Men who have sex with men 

    • Men or women who have sex with a person infected with hepatitis B virus 

    • People with other sexually transmitted diseases 

    • People who inject drugs with shared needles 

    • People who receive transfusions of blood or blood products 

    • People who undergo dialysis for kidney disease 

    • Institutionalized mentally handicapped people and their attendants, caregivers, and family members 

    • Health care workers who are stuck with needles or other sharp instruments contaminated with infected blood 

    • Infants born to infected mothers

    In some cases, the source of transmission is never known.

    You cannot get hepatitis B from the following activities:

    • Having someone sneeze or cough on you 

    • Hugging someone

    • Handshaking a persons hand

    • Breastfeeding your child

    • Eating food or drinking water 

    • Casual contact (such as an office or social setting)
    Quoting Mommy2b2324:

    I didn't say among preschoolers. In general it's easy to be exposed to it and become sick. Otherwise it wouldn't be included in sets of shots especially for such young children


    Quoting emmy526:

    Hep B a prevalent illness amongst preschoolers? Please elaborate and share any links you have which have credible references.  I have yet to read about this being a problem amongst that age bracket.  


    Quoting Mommy2b2324:

    Its standard in infant vaccs. My oldest is 4learning and he has received it as have my younger two children. Its still a very prevalent illness and the little ones need early prevention protection




  • xoxRachelxox
    October 9, 2012 at 6:09 PM

    It's normal. All of mine got them. My oldest is 14 and he got them as a baby.

    They always gave me the information pertaining to the type of shots they were getting. Explaining what they were for. Does yours not give that info out? Maybe you could ask for it next time.

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