candlegal
Texas lawmakers brace for intense special session, as abortion debate resumes
July 1, 2013 at 7:53 AM


Both sides of the abortion debate were bracing for an intense special session in Texas, as Gov. Rick Perry vowed that a Republican-backed law derailed by a filibuster and screaming protesters would not be stymied this time. 

The new 30-day session begins Monday. Perry called lawmakers back after Democratic state Sen. Wendy Davis, joined by hundreds of demonstrators, ran out the clock at the end of the last session, in turn defeating a strict abortion bill banning the procedure after the 20th week of pregnancy. 

Davis did a round of Sunday-show interviews insisting she would not give up the fight against the bill. She told NBC's "Meet the Press" that she had no plans to "concede the argument." 

"These are matters of personal liberty. In Texas, we hold very dear to intrusions against our personal liberty. We fight very hard against that. And we will fight as we begin the session again on Monday," she said. 

She added: "And even if this bill passes, obviously there will be challenges to it going forward." 

Perry and Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst were equally confident they would be successful this time. 

"It will pass overwhelmingly and will become the law in the state," Perry said Friday in an interview with conservative radio host Laura Ingraham. "I think the voice of the people of Texas will be heard." 

Davis and legislative Democrats stopped the bill at the midnight Tuesday deadline of the first special session in part because Perry had delayed adding it to the agenda. This time, lawmakers can take up the issue immediately and the Republican majorities in the House and Senate are expected to pass the bill for Perry to sign into law. 

Dewhurst said Saturday after speaking at the National Right to Life Convention that next time, he'll move to have protesters thrown out if they become disorderly. He said he had tried to get them out Tuesday, though outnumbered troopers in the Capitol were not seen removing most protesters until the early hours of Wednesday. 

"Believe me," Dewhurst told reporters. "I have spent most of my time between about 4 a.m. on Wednesday morning and through yesterday making sure that when I give the order ... to clear the gallery, it gets done." 

In his speech, Dewhurst ripped the crowds opposing a vote as driven by "hatred" and "mob rule." He called on anti-abortion activists to fill hearing rooms and galleries during the next session as their opponents have done, and use social media to broadcast their support using the hashtag "#stand4life." 

As for Davis, whose 11-hour filibuster delayed the vote on the session's final day and put her in the national spotlight, Dewhurst said, "No human being can talk for two weeks. This bill is going to pass." 

He told reporters he would move quickly on the bill to keep it out of "filibuster range." 

Perry's move to add abortion regulations well into the first special session limited the time senators had to act on it, Dewhurst said. 

Dewhurst also backed down from comments published Friday on the conservative website Hot Air, in which he said he'd heard reporters in the Capitol were inciting protesters. He told Hot Air he would "take action" against any reporters who were driving the crowd. 

On Saturday, he said he respected reporters and that "the case is closed." 

Dewhurst has been lieutenant governor since 2002, and he is running for re-election next year. But a year after he was soundly beaten in the Republican primary for U.S. Senate by Ted Cruz, Dewhurst faces rivals who used Tuesday's episode to question his ability. 

Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson said in a letter that Dewhurst "has lost his grip on the reins of the Senate." And state Sen. Dan Patrick, who has also joined the race, said the Senate needs new leadership. 

Asked about his opponents, Dewhurst said, "I know it's harder to stay on top than get on top, and I'm going to make sure this state keeps moving forward." 

Dewhurst was flanked Saturday by two women from groups that oppose abortion: Texans For Life Coalition president Kyleen Wright and Elizabeth Graham of Texas Right to Life. Wright and Graham said they continued to support the lieutenant governor. 

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Replies

  • candlegal
    July 1, 2013 at 8:33 AM

    I will be curious to see if the mob will rule again.

  • yourspecialkid
    July 1, 2013 at 8:58 AM

    Part of the text of the legislation...the link will give you the entire thing. 

    Sec. 171.046.  EXCEPTIONS.  (a) Provides that the prohibitions and requirements under Sections 171.043, 171.044, and 171.045(b) do not apply to an abortion performed if there exists a condition that, in the physician's reasonable medical judgment, so complicates the medical condition of the woman that, to avert the woman's death or a serious risk of substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function, other than a psychological condition, it necessitates, as applicable:

     

    (1) the immediate abortion of her pregnancy without the delay necessary to determine the probable post-fertilization age of the unborn child;

     

    (2) the abortion of her pregnancy even though the post-fertilization age of the unborn child is 20 or more weeks; or

     

    (3) the use of a method of abortion other than a method described by Section 171.045(b).

     

    (b) Prohibits a physician from taking an action authorized under Subsection (a) if the risk of death or a substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function arises from a claim or diagnosis that the woman will engage in conduct that may result in her death or in substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function.

     

    (c) Provides that the prohibitions and requirements under Sections 171.043, 171.044, and 171.045(b) do not apply to an abortion performed on an unborn child who has a profound and irremediable congenital anomaly.

    http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/tlodocs/831/analysis/html/SB00005I.htm

     

  • romalove
    July 1, 2013 at 9:01 AM


    Quoting yourspecialkid:

    Part of the text of the legislation...the link will give you the entire thing. 

    Sec. 171.046.  EXCEPTIONS.  (a) Provides that the prohibitions and requirements under Sections 171.043, 171.044, and 171.045(b) do not apply to an abortion performed if there exists a condition that, in the physician's reasonable medical judgment, so complicates the medical condition of the woman that, to avert the woman's death or a serious risk of substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function, other than a psychological condition, it necessitates, as applicable:

     

    (1) the immediate abortion of her pregnancy without the delay necessary to determine the probable post-fertilization age of the unborn child;

     

    (2) the abortion of her pregnancy even though the post-fertilization age of the unborn child is 20 or more weeks; or

     

    (3) the use of a method of abortion other than a method described by Section 171.045(b).

     

    (b) Prohibits a physician from taking an action authorized under Subsection (a) if the risk of death or a substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function arises from a claim or diagnosis that the woman will engage in conduct that may result in her death or in substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function.

     

    (c) Provides that the prohibitions and requirements under Sections 171.043, 171.044, and 171.045(b) do not apply to an abortion performed on an unborn child who has a profound and irremediable congenital anomaly.

    http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/tlodocs/831/analysis/html/SB00005I.htm

     

    I think the larger issue is that it will close all but a few of the abortion clinics in the state due to the regulation that providers must have hospital admitting privileges.

    The goal here is to close clinics and make it as hard as possible for women to get abortions.  Very disgraceful and will put many women in jeopardy.

  • RandRMomma
    July 1, 2013 at 9:03 AM
    As a proponent of choice, I hope the "mob" rules everytime.

    Quoting candlegal:

    I will be curious to see if the mob will rule again.

  • yourspecialkid
    July 1, 2013 at 9:05 AM

     

    Quoting romalove:


    Quoting yourspecialkid:

    Part of the text of the legislation...the link will give you the entire thing. 

    Sec. 171.046.  EXCEPTIONS.  (a) Provides that the prohibitions and requirements under Sections 171.043, 171.044, and 171.045(b) do not apply to an abortion performed if there exists a condition that, in the physician's reasonable medical judgment, so complicates the medical condition of the woman that, to avert the woman's death or a serious risk of substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function, other than a psychological condition, it necessitates, as applicable:

     

    (1) the immediate abortion of her pregnancy without the delay necessary to determine the probable post-fertilization age of the unborn child;

     

    (2) the abortion of her pregnancy even though the post-fertilization age of the unborn child is 20 or more weeks; or

     

    (3) the use of a method of abortion other than a method described by Section 171.045(b).

     

    (b) Prohibits a physician from taking an action authorized under Subsection (a) if the risk of death or a substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function arises from a claim or diagnosis that the woman will engage in conduct that may result in her death or in substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function.

     

    (c) Provides that the prohibitions and requirements under Sections 171.043, 171.044, and 171.045(b) do not apply to an abortion performed on an unborn child who has a profound and irremediable congenital anomaly.

    http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/tlodocs/831/analysis/html/SB00005I.htm

     

    I think the larger issue is that it will close all but a few of the abortion clinics in the state due to the regulation that providers must have hospital admitting privileges.

    The goal here is to close clinics and make it as hard as possible for women to get abortions.  Very disgraceful and will put many women in jeopardy.

    Would you have surgery at a clinic if your doctor could not admit you to the hospital in the event of an emergency?  Of course not.  This should be a given. 

    I think the bigger issue is few doctors want to do this kind of work.

     

  • Mommabearbergh
    July 1, 2013 at 9:06 AM
    Makes you think of all those back alley abortion clinics that killed so many women.Just a scary thought
    Quoting romalove:


    Quoting yourspecialkid:

    Part of the text of the legislation...the link will give you the entire thing. 

    Sec. 171.046.  EXCEPTIONS.  (a) Provides that the prohibitions and requirements under Sections 171.043, 171.044, and 171.045(b) do not apply to an abortion performed if there exists a condition that, in the physician's reasonable medical judgment, so complicates the medical condition of the woman that, to avert the woman's death or a serious risk of substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function, other than a psychological condition, it necessitates, as applicable:

     

    (1) the immediate abortion of her pregnancy without the delay necessary to determine the probable post-fertilization age of the unborn child;

     

    (2) the abortion of her pregnancy even though the post-fertilization age of the unborn child is 20 or more weeks; or

     

    (3) the use of a method of abortion other than a method described by Section 171.045(b).

     

    (b) Prohibits a physician from taking an action authorized under Subsection (a) if the risk of death or a substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function arises from a claim or diagnosis that the woman will engage in conduct that may result in her death or in substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function.

     

    (c) Provides that the prohibitions and requirements under Sections 171.043, 171.044, and 171.045(b) do not apply to an abortion performed on an unborn child who has a profound and irremediable congenital anomaly.

    http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/tlodocs/831/analysis/html/SB00005I.htm

     

    I think the larger issue is that it will close all but a few of the abortion clinics in the state due to the regulation that providers must have hospital admitting privileges.

    The goal here is to close clinics and make it as hard as possible for women to get abortions.  Very disgraceful and will put many women in jeopardy.


  • romalove
    July 1, 2013 at 9:10 AM


    Quoting yourspecialkid:

     

    Quoting romalove:


    Quoting yourspecialkid:

    Part of the text of the legislation...the link will give you the entire thing. 

    Sec. 171.046.  EXCEPTIONS.  (a) Provides that the prohibitions and requirements under Sections 171.043, 171.044, and 171.045(b) do not apply to an abortion performed if there exists a condition that, in the physician's reasonable medical judgment, so complicates the medical condition of the woman that, to avert the woman's death or a serious risk of substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function, other than a psychological condition, it necessitates, as applicable:

     

    (1) the immediate abortion of her pregnancy without the delay necessary to determine the probable post-fertilization age of the unborn child;

     

    (2) the abortion of her pregnancy even though the post-fertilization age of the unborn child is 20 or more weeks; or

     

    (3) the use of a method of abortion other than a method described by Section 171.045(b).

     

    (b) Prohibits a physician from taking an action authorized under Subsection (a) if the risk of death or a substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function arises from a claim or diagnosis that the woman will engage in conduct that may result in her death or in substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function.

     

    (c) Provides that the prohibitions and requirements under Sections 171.043, 171.044, and 171.045(b) do not apply to an abortion performed on an unborn child who has a profound and irremediable congenital anomaly.

    http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/tlodocs/831/analysis/html/SB00005I.htm

     

    I think the larger issue is that it will close all but a few of the abortion clinics in the state due to the regulation that providers must have hospital admitting privileges.

    The goal here is to close clinics and make it as hard as possible for women to get abortions.  Very disgraceful and will put many women in jeopardy.

    Would you have surgery at a clinic if your doctor could not admit you to the hospital in the event of an emergency?  Of course not.  This should be a given. 

    I think the bigger issue is few doctors want to do this kind of work.

     

    Comparing the vast majority of abortions to "surgery" is nonsense.  If there was an emergency and a hospital was nearby, you could be admitted through the emergency room whether or not the doctor had admitting privileges, same as if you broke your leg roller skating and someone ran you to the hospital.  What do you think happens, you are bleeding and are taken to the hospital and they say "oh no, that doctor doesn't have privileges, you have to go die"?

  • romalove
    July 1, 2013 at 9:10 AM


    Quoting Mommabearbergh:

    Makes you think of all those back alley abortion clinics that killed so many women.Just a scary thought
    Quoting romalove:


    Quoting yourspecialkid:

    Part of the text of the legislation...the link will give you the entire thing. 

    Sec. 171.046.  EXCEPTIONS.  (a) Provides that the prohibitions and requirements under Sections 171.043, 171.044, and 171.045(b) do not apply to an abortion performed if there exists a condition that, in the physician's reasonable medical judgment, so complicates the medical condition of the woman that, to avert the woman's death or a serious risk of substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function, other than a psychological condition, it necessitates, as applicable:

     

    (1) the immediate abortion of her pregnancy without the delay necessary to determine the probable post-fertilization age of the unborn child;

     

    (2) the abortion of her pregnancy even though the post-fertilization age of the unborn child is 20 or more weeks; or

     

    (3) the use of a method of abortion other than a method described by Section 171.045(b).

     

    (b) Prohibits a physician from taking an action authorized under Subsection (a) if the risk of death or a substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function arises from a claim or diagnosis that the woman will engage in conduct that may result in her death or in substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function.

     

    (c) Provides that the prohibitions and requirements under Sections 171.043, 171.044, and 171.045(b) do not apply to an abortion performed on an unborn child who has a profound and irremediable congenital anomaly.

    http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/tlodocs/831/analysis/html/SB00005I.htm

     

    I think the larger issue is that it will close all but a few of the abortion clinics in the state due to the regulation that providers must have hospital admitting privileges.

    The goal here is to close clinics and make it as hard as possible for women to get abortions.  Very disgraceful and will put many women in jeopardy.


    Texas is vast and this requirement will put many women in just that position.

    It's tragic.

  • yourspecialkid
    July 1, 2013 at 9:13 AM

     

    Quoting romalove:


    Quoting yourspecialkid:

     

    Quoting romalove:


    Quoting yourspecialkid:

    Part of the text of the legislation...the link will give you the entire thing. 

    Sec. 171.046.  EXCEPTIONS.  (a) Provides that the prohibitions and requirements under Sections 171.043, 171.044, and 171.045(b) do not apply to an abortion performed if there exists a condition that, in the physician's reasonable medical judgment, so complicates the medical condition of the woman that, to avert the woman's death or a serious risk of substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function, other than a psychological condition, it necessitates, as applicable:

     

    (1) the immediate abortion of her pregnancy without the delay necessary to determine the probable post-fertilization age of the unborn child;

     

    (2) the abortion of her pregnancy even though the post-fertilization age of the unborn child is 20 or more weeks; or

     

    (3) the use of a method of abortion other than a method described by Section 171.045(b).

     

    (b) Prohibits a physician from taking an action authorized under Subsection (a) if the risk of death or a substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function arises from a claim or diagnosis that the woman will engage in conduct that may result in her death or in substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function.

     

    (c) Provides that the prohibitions and requirements under Sections 171.043, 171.044, and 171.045(b) do not apply to an abortion performed on an unborn child who has a profound and irremediable congenital anomaly.

    http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/tlodocs/831/analysis/html/SB00005I.htm

     

    I think the larger issue is that it will close all but a few of the abortion clinics in the state due to the regulation that providers must have hospital admitting privileges.

    The goal here is to close clinics and make it as hard as possible for women to get abortions.  Very disgraceful and will put many women in jeopardy.

    Would you have surgery at a clinic if your doctor could not admit you to the hospital in the event of an emergency?  Of course not.  This should be a given. 

    I think the bigger issue is few doctors want to do this kind of work.

     

    Comparing the vast majority of abortions to "surgery" is nonsense.  If there was an emergency and a hospital was nearby, you could be admitted through the emergency room whether or not the doctor had admitting privileges, same as if you broke your leg roller skating and someone ran you to the hospital.  What do you think happens, you are bleeding and are taken to the hospital and they say "oh no, that doctor doesn't have privileges, you have to go die"?

     This is YOUR opinion.  I take the removal of a living thing from the body of another living thing a little more seriously.  We will just have to agree to disagree.

     

  • AtiFreeFalls
    July 1, 2013 at 9:14 AM

     People undergo procedures much more complex and with much higher complication rates than abortion in clinics without immediate access to a hospital.  No one is saying a damn thing about that.  Abortion has fewer complication risks than full term pregnancy and childbirth, but here in Texas midwives are licensed and regulated.  Even though more women die in childbirth than from abortion.  Because having a baby at home is a valid and meaningful choice and is necessary if women wish to remain autonomous decision makers in their own healthcare.  I have chosen home birth and would again, and I want my freedom to remain.  Restricting abortion, when it is less dangerous than home birth (or any birth, for that matter, since low-risk home birth is as safe as hospital birth) sets up a precedent that can be used to strip women of virtually all reproductive rights.

    Quoting yourspecialkid:

    Would you have surgery at a clinic if your doctor could not admit you to the hospital in the event of an emergency?  Of course not.  This should be a given. 

    I think the bigger issue is few doctors want to do this kind of work.