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futureshock
Importance of Preschool: Childhood experiences differ by socio-economic class
January 16, 2013 at 10:09 PM

This is an excerpt from:

The Early Education Racket

If you are reading this article, your kid probably doesn’t need preschool.

It’s hard to tease out the effects of preschool on a child. Part of the problem is self-selection: Compared with kids who skip preschool, kids who attend usually have more well-to-do, encouraging parents who read and do puzzles with them at home. Children who don’t go to preschool are usually from more disadvantaged families, which means they watch lots of TV and are yelled at more than they are praised, which some researchers believe can stunt cognitive development.

I am not making a Bell Curve argument here; promise. But research suggests that parents who are financially comfortable tend to devote more resources and time to their kids, in part because they can. In work they conducted at the University of Kansas and chronicled in their book Meaningful Differences in the Everyday Experience of Young American Children, Betty Hart and Todd Risley recorded, for two-and-a-half years, a full hour of conversation every day between parents and children from 42 American families of differing social classes. Children with professional parents heard about 30 million words by the time they turned 3, compared with 20 million in working-class families and 10 million in welfare families. In addition, the ratio of parental encouragements to reprimands was about 6-to-1 among professional families, 2-to-1 among the working class and 1-to-2 in welfare homes. These different experiences closely tracked with the children’s later academic and intellectual performance, and other studies have since supported these findings.

But what does all this have to do with preschool? Research suggests that preschool only benefits children from these disadvantaged families (in particular, families that are below the poverty line, whose mothers are uneducated, or who are racial minorities). This could be because preschool acts as a kind of “equalizer,” ensuring that for at least a few hours a day, these kids get the same high-quality interaction with adults as more advantaged children do, which helps to even the developmental playing field.

For instance, in a study published last year, University of Texas psychologist Elliot Tucker-Drob assessed a number of different characteristics in a group of more than 600 pairs of twins. He looked at the scores the children got at age 2 on tests of mental ability; whether or not they went to preschool; how “stimulating” their mothers’ interactions were with them; their socio-economic status and race; and finally, how well they scored on reading and math tests at age 5. Because he was comparing what happened to identical twins, who share all of their genes, and fraternal twins, who on average share half (yet both sets typically grow up together), Tucker-Drob could home in on the effects of environment and genetics on the kids’ outcomes.

A hell of a lot of math later, Tucker-Drob reported that the home environments of children who do not attend preschool have a much larger influence on kindergarten academic ability than do the home environments of preschoolers. In other words, a bad home situation becomes a much smaller problem when your kid goes to preschool; when you have a good home environment, preschool doesn’t really matter. (Granted, children from poor families tend to go to lower quality preschools than wealthy kids do, but for them, a bad preschool is usually better than nothing.)

To read in it's entirety:

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Replies

  • futureshock
    January 16, 2013 at 10:10 PM

    Research suggests that preschool only benefits children from these disadvantaged families (in particular, families that are below the poverty line, whose mothers are uneducated, or who are racial minorities).

  • stacymomof2
    January 16, 2013 at 10:15 PM

    I'm a big believer in preschool.  I think all kids gain something, and for some it makes a huge difference.

  • mommygiggles317
    January 16, 2013 at 10:33 PM

    I call BULLSHIT!!! This article is wrong on so many levels it's sad... smdh

  • romalove
    January 16, 2013 at 10:37 PM

    My kids all loved preschool and learned a lot.  One of the things that I can't teach at home is the cadence of a school day, which they get at preschool.  My children had great experiences and went to kindergarten already reading.  

    Nothing in an article will convince me it wasn't a good choice for my family.

  • Bigmetalchicken
    January 16, 2013 at 10:42 PM

    I see preschool as a way for him to better learn how to interact with other kids, and how to learn to listen to instruction from teachers. It is also helpful in the transition period, getting used to being away from home and his parents.

  • desertlvn
    January 16, 2013 at 10:49 PM

    I just can't get over the fact that researchers somehow counted how many words kids heard in the first 3 yrs of life.....

    Beyond that I love my kids' preschool. Playbased, lots of physical motions, getting dirty, and being social. Interesting read.

  • JakeandEmmasMom
    January 16, 2013 at 10:53 PM

     I really think it depends on the quality of the preschool.  Many of them in my area are glorified daycare. 

  • desertlvn
    January 16, 2013 at 10:58 PM


    Quoting JakeandEmmasMom:

     I really think it depends on the quality of the preschool.  Many of them in my area are glorified daycare. 

    I so agree with this. There were only two preschools in town that I would have considered for my children.

  • Peanutx3
    January 16, 2013 at 10:58 PM
    Hmm 2 out of 3 of my kids had one year of preschool. My youngest didn't attend preschool but went to a very good daycare where they actually did things and learned a lot. I don't see that preschool is needed for every child.
  • Bigmetalchicken
    January 16, 2013 at 11:01 PM

    Also, I have heard studies that say the opposite (sort of), and that programs like head start and free preschools actually do little to help the children of the poor and uneducated, because their parents are not enforcing the importance of what the child is learning.

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