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"Consider This" Part II: Home Economics, A Requirement For High School Graduation
October 9, 2012 at 1:15 PM

 This post is spun off/a continuation of my other post ("Consider This") about redesigning the food stamp program. In "Consider This", folks voiced the concern that many food stamp recipients don't know how to cook fresh foods, and many don't know how to properly store them. It is also a concern that Americans in general don't know how to budget.

So, as part II to "Consider This;", I'll ask you to, well..."Consider This:"

Why don't we make successful completion of a year-long home economics class a requirement for high school graduation? Of all the things we teach in schools, we aren't teaching kids how to balance a budget, shop wisely, cook and store food? I consider this far more important than algebra, yet algebra is a requirement for graduation in Ohio, and home economics is not.

Truly, common sense isn't so common anymore. And with so many parents working evenings, or working two jobs, how many American teenagers aren't being taught how to cook and manage finances?

What do you think? Home ec a requirement in high school: yay or nay?

 

Replies

  • FromAtoZ
    October 9, 2012 at 10:58 PM


    Quoting GotSomeKids:

    They use bananas in some districts.  Thank goodness they didn't have a fruit/veggie like visual aid when my son went through his "health" briefing last year.

    Quoting FromAtoZ:


    Quoting toomanypoodles:

     I'd rather see that than a class for putting a condom on a cucumber. 

    Yes, young women AND men should be taught these skills! 

    As homeschoolers, after the three Rs, we have really hit on homemaking skills. 

    You are kidding, right?  Where do they teach students to put a condom on a cucumber?


    Wow.  They do not do that here.

    I can see the kids laughing more than any thing else.  Oh my.

  • katzmeow726
    October 9, 2012 at 11:04 PM

    I took home ec (actually it was called home managment).

     It didn't teach me a single thing I didn't already know, and the majority of household management, Ihad to learn by experience alone.   

  • katzmeow726
    October 9, 2012 at 11:06 PM

    Nope...the only thing we got in health class was a teacher that held up a pen cap and asked "what is this?" We're all looking around, and of course, someone says "a pen cap coach?" 

    He says "NO!"  

    Nervous looks

    "this is an artery...it is blocked (pointing to the tip of the cap), and then proceeded on to the lesson about health...

    We had many examples like that, but no cucumber condoms! 

    Quoting FromAtoZ:


    Quoting GotSomeKids:

    They use bananas in some districts.  Thank goodness they didn't have a fruit/veggie like visual aid when my son went through his "health" briefing last year.

    Quoting FromAtoZ:


    Quoting toomanypoodles:

     I'd rather see that than a class for putting a condom on a cucumber. 

    Yes, young women AND men should be taught these skills! 

    As homeschoolers, after the three Rs, we have really hit on homemaking skills. 

    You are kidding, right?  Where do they teach students to put a condom on a cucumber?


    Wow.  They do not do that here.

    I can see the kids laughing more than any thing else.  Oh my.


  • cjsix
    by cjsix
    October 9, 2012 at 11:20 PM

     

    Quoting eema.gray:

    I more or less agree but I think it should be called something like "household management" and include budgeting, practical investing, as well as things like shopping (not just food, all kinds of shopping), food prep, and distinguishing between "want" and "need."

     Mine all know this or much of it...minus the investing... (including my nine year old) along with sewing(yep, even my older son knows how to sew and repair something if needed,not just my girls) and they all know how to do the laundry,take care of a garden,bake from scratch,can and make jam, among other things. I do think it's important that they learn these things,they're just the basics of living on your own.

  • eema.gray
    October 9, 2012 at 11:27 PM


    Quoting cjsix:

     

    Quoting eema.gray:

    I more or less agree but I think it should be called something like "household management" and include budgeting, practical investing, as well as things like shopping (not just food, all kinds of shopping), food prep, and distinguishing between "want" and "need."

     Mine all know this or much of it...minus the investing... (including my nine year old) along with sewing(yep, even my older son knows how to sew and repair something if needed,not just my girls) and they all know how to do the laundry,take care of a garden,bake from scratch,can and make jam, among other things. I do think it's important that they learn these things,they're just the basics of living on your own.

    Yup, sew a button, patch pants, darn a sock; I've got a decent list of maintenance skills to teach mine as they get bigger.  :-)

    My brothers learned to cook right along with me; today, the brother who is married is the home management specialist for his family.  Besides his career, he does the shopping, budgeting, and 95% of the cooking for his family.  Supposedly, one of the reasons his wife is his wife is because of his mad cooking skills, LOL.

  • cjsix
    by cjsix
    October 9, 2012 at 11:32 PM

     

    Quoting eema.gray:

     

    Quoting cjsix:

     

    Quoting eema.gray:

    I more or less agree but I think it should be called something like "household management" and include budgeting, practical investing, as well as things like shopping (not just food, all kinds of shopping), food prep, and distinguishing between "want" and "need."

     Mine all know this or much of it...minus the investing... (including my nine year old) along with sewing(yep, even my older son knows how to sew and repair something if needed,not just my girls) and they all know how to do the laundry,take care of a garden,bake from scratch,can and make jam, among other things. I do think it's important that they learn these things,they're just the basics of living on your own.

    Yup, sew a button, patch pants, darn a sock; I've got a decent list of maintenance skills to teach mine as they get bigger.  :-)

    My brothers learned to cook right along with me; today, the brother who is married is the home management specialist for his family.  Besides his career, he does the shopping, budgeting, and 95% of the cooking for his family.  Supposedly, one of the reasons his wife is his wife is because of his mad cooking skills, LOL.

     Sounds like she got a good catch! LOL!

  • toomanypoodles
    October 10, 2012 at 2:35 AM

     

    Quoting FromAtoZ:


    Quoting toomanypoodles:

     I'd rather see that than a class for putting a condom on a cucumber. 

    Yes, young women AND men should be taught these skills! 

    As homeschoolers, after the three Rs, we have really hit on homemaking skills. 

    You are kidding, right?  Where do they teach students to put a condom on a cucumber?

     Sex education classes.  Some do teach the children how to practice safe sex.  It's a "great" visual tool. 

  • Sekirei
    by Sekirei
    October 10, 2012 at 4:53 AM

    I failed home ec so badly.

    However, I can see your point. Though, I can just imagine the complaining when dad finds out his manly boy has to take home ec (in general, not anyone specifically... oh wait, my dad would have done that)

  • Sekirei
    by Sekirei
    October 10, 2012 at 4:53 AM


    Quoting toomanypoodles:

     

    Quoting FromAtoZ:


    Quoting toomanypoodles:

     I'd rather see that than a class for putting a condom on a cucumber. 

    Yes, young women AND men should be taught these skills! 

    As homeschoolers, after the three Rs, we have really hit on homemaking skills. 

    You are kidding, right?  Where do they teach students to put a condom on a cucumber?

     Sex education classes.  Some do teach the children how to practice safe sex.  It's a "great" visual tool. 

    True story..

    however, we got a banana... :/