jadedcynic
Are your kids rebellious? Enact the Death Penalty, according to one Republican
October 8, 2012 at 2:22 PM

Charlie Fuqua, Arkansas Legislative Candidate, Endorses Death Penalty For Rebellious Children In Book

The Huffington Post  |  By  

In "God's Law," Fuqua's 2012 book, the candidate wrote that while parents love their children, a process could be set up to allow for the institution of the death penalty for "rebellious children," according to the Arkansas Times. Fuqua, who is anti-abortion, points out that the course of action involved in sentencing a child to death is described in the Bible and would involve judicial approval. While it is unlikely that many parents would seek to have their children killed by the government, Fuqua wrote, such power would serve as a way to stop rebellious children.

According to the Arkansas TimesFuqua wrote:

The maintenance of civil order in society rests on the foundation of family discipline. Therefore, a child who disrespects his parents must be permanently removed from society in a way that gives an example to all other children of the importance of respect for parents. The death penalty for rebellious children is not something to be taken lightly. The guidelines for administering the death penalty to rebellious children are given in Deut 21:18-21:

This passage does not give parents blanket authority to kill their children. They must follow the proper procedure in order to have the death penalty executed against their children. I cannot think of one instance in the Scripture where parents had their child put to death. Why is this so? Other than the love Christ has for us, there is no greater love then [sic] that of a parent for their child. The last people who would want to see a child put to death would be the parents of the child. Even so, the Scrpture provides a safe guard to protect children from parents who would wrongly exercise the death penalty against them. Parents are required to bring their children to the gate of the city. The gate of the city was the place where the elders of the city met and made judicial pronouncements. In other words, the parents were required to take their children to a court of law and lay out their case before the proper judicial authority, and let the judicial authority determine if the child should be put to death. I know of many cases of rebellious children, however, I cannot think of one case where I believe that a parent had given up on their child to the point that they would have taken their child to a court of law and asked the court to rule that the child be put to death. Even though this procedure would rarely be used, if it were the law of land, it would give parents authority. Children would know that their parents had authority and it would be a tremendous incentive for children to give proper respect to their parents.

In the same book, Fuqua advocated for expelling Muslims from the U.S., saying it would solve what he described as the "Muslim problem." Fuqua, who has been backed by the state GOP and is seeking a comeback, has found himself under attack by Republicans since his comments surfaced at the same time it was reported that state Rep. Jon Hubbard (R-Jonesboro) endorsed slavery in his book. Fuqua told the Associated Press that he was surprised by the reaction to his writings on Muslims.

"I think my views are fairly well-accepted by most people," Fuqua said to AP.

Fuqua declined to answer questions from The Huffington Post.

"I'm not going to talk to you," he said before hanging up.

On his campaign blog, Fuqua highlights his service on the Children and Families Committee while a member of the Arkansas Legislature in 1997. He also describesliberals and Muslims as the "anti-Christ" and says he believes they are conspiring to create a "bloody revolution."

"There is a strange alliance between the liberal left and the Muslim religion. It may be that since both are the enemies of Christianity, that they both believe that, my enemy's enemy is my friend," Fuqua writes. "However there are several similarities between the two. Both are antichrist in that they both deny that Jesus is God in the flesh of man, and the savior of mankind. They both also hold that their cause should take over the entire world through violent, bloody, revolution."

Replies

  • jadedcynic
    October 8, 2012 at 2:23 PM

    One of his biggest campaign supporters are the Duggars.

  • meriana
    by meriana
    October 8, 2012 at 2:32 PM

    How many rocks do they have to turn over to even find these people?  Really the people in white coats should pay some of them a visit. Scary that they are in a position to affect public policy and laws.

  • radioheid
    October 8, 2012 at 2:35 PM

     This fuckin' guy again?

    No thanks, I'd rather ground my son from his Xbox when he's caught not doing his homework. Let's have the punishment fit the crime, shall we?

  • AdrianneHill
    October 8, 2012 at 2:43 PM
    Completely not surprised.

    Quoting jadedcynic:

    One of his biggest campaign supporters are the Duggars.

  • Stephanie329
    October 8, 2012 at 2:49 PM
    "I think my views are fairly well-accepted by most people," Fuqua said to AP.


    Delusional.

    And he's pro-life????
  • Stephanie329
    October 8, 2012 at 2:51 PM
    They seem to be slithering their way out.

    Quoting meriana:

    How many rocks do they have to turn over to even find these people?  Really the people in white coats should pay some of them a visit. Scary that they are in a position to affect public policy and laws.

  • beesbad
    by beesbad
    October 8, 2012 at 2:53 PM

    This has less to do with his being a Republican and more to do with his being an ignorant fundamentalist. 

  • JuneH
    by JuneH
    October 8, 2012 at 3:03 PM


    Quoting beesbad:

    This has less to do with his being a Republican and more to do with his being an ignorant fundamentalist. 

    this implies there is a difference

  • jadedcynic
    October 8, 2012 at 3:09 PM

    Even some Republicans find him abhorrent.

  • jadedcynic
    October 8, 2012 at 3:14 PM

    Apparently he was an executive sales rep for Monsanto, too.