annabl1970
Do I Really Need To Discuss Politics With My In-Laws?
October 8, 2012 at 11:44 AM

Talking politics with your in-laws may be as pleasant as reclining on a bed of nails, but in an election season it's hard to get away from it. I'll pass over the bland advice of being compassionate and understanding and arm you with strategies. A good question can take the place of name-calling and mud-flinging.

I was on a plane recently, and the man sitting next to me was reading a hunting magazine. I am not a hunter, but I know several people who hunt who are nice human beings. They have helped me when my car was stuck, they have let my grandchildren play with their dogs--they're good people. And I am interested in learning why hunters are against gun control. So I began the conversation with a compliment. "I have a question," I said. "I think most gun owners and hunters are responsible people. I don't understand why they would be against gun control when often, they support having driver's licenses, boater's licenses, and they themselves get hunting licenses."

He said, "Well, that's a good question." He in fact felt that automatic rifles should be regulated. He then went on to say that the National Rifle Association has so worked up gun owners to believe that any regulation would prevent them from ever getting more guns or ammunition that they are buying up more ammunition than they will ever use in their lifetime. He felt the whole issue was an economic one. The gun sellers were making too much money to ever allow the issue of regulation to be solved. Now, I realized we had something to go on, a way to begin a conversation and maybe even be a way to craft legislation that would guarantee rights to buy ammunition, but to also control automatic weapons. Those who want to control guns sales and responsible gun owners could probably find a compromise and at least something to talk about.

But you say, "My in-law's are just out to bait me -- they're looking for a fight." So, instead of engaging in verbal warfare, divert the conversation. "Aren't we lucky we agree on so many things. We both love your child, we love the little grand ids. And we are lucky to live in America where we can agree to disagree." Tone is everything here. It makes the difference between a snide remark and a peace offering. A smile and a happy voice signals, "I don't want to change my opinion any more than you do," while a sneer signals disdain.

But if you want to expand your understanding and maybe have an interesting conversation, find an issue you are curious about, one where you truly would like to find out how and why someone could possibly think differently from you. Then ask a question with kindness and curiosity. Don't plan to convert or convince, rather try to find things in the other person's position that interest you and that you're curious about. It's better to try to connect on that point rather than the big ideology where you'll clash. Asking questions and finding out how others think is far less boring than just being nice and avoiding any "hot" topics. Being with your in-laws might just turn out to be a fascinating experience a chance to find out how the other half thinks And like living with a family in a foreign country, you get to see how they operate.

If the answers to questions in the political arena were easy and there were no confounding influences we would have solved all human problems. Adults have a right to differ, and if we want to make peace in our families, we have to try--and I mean really try--to see things to understand the other's thinking. Only then can we differ with respect.

Replies

  • GLWerth
    by GLWerth
    October 8, 2012 at 1:35 PM

    Wow. Your MIL sounds, um, exotic.

    Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:

    The guidelines set forth in this article are only going to effective when the in-laws are reasonable people. I remember the first time I told my MIL that my husband was a kind, thoughtful, generous man and that she likely played a huge role in that. I mentioned that she must be so proud. I was met with a glaring stink eye and a "hmmm".


  • GotSomeKids
    October 8, 2012 at 1:45 PM

    The hubby use to be Dem, now is Rep.  In laws span the spectrum, but mostly I just have a problem with my brother in law.

    He's mad that I won't claim a party.  He says its people like me who ruin the system.

    About five years ago, I told my hubby if his brother didn't learn a little respect and stop yelling, he ban the subject when he is around.

    Meanwhile, my MIL is conservative and my FIL is liberal and I don't have a problem talkign with them at all. 


  • annabl1970
    October 8, 2012 at 2:14 PM

    DH had customer in LA.
    The same a...h... racist like your in laws.

    I can't even post on public forum the shit he was talking once, he was drunk. I believe drunk people tell the truth. No surprise DH banned  from doing business with him. IMO better don't make money, than make money with hateful moron.

    Quoting FromAtoZ:

    There was no way I was going to discuss politics with my former in laws.  He made his voice and position loud and clear.  He is a complete racist asshole.  Nothing to discuss with some one like that.


  • annabl1970
    October 8, 2012 at 2:16 PM


    Quoting FromAtoZ:


    Quoting Sisteract:

    I can't imagine thinking only way; liberal or conservative on all issues.

    Doesn't living, experiencing, becoming educated, having relationships or  reading inspire and spur one to question alternative positions or ideals on at least some of the issues?

    I sometimes wonder if there are people who approach politics similar to religion- They belong to a group because they were born into that group and continue to strictly follow and parrot what the group presents?

    The party only voters are very interesting, IMO-

    You bring up a good point.  While I may vote for X doesn't mean I do not take in to account what Y has said, done, etc.

    There are those that stick to their party regardless of any thing and every thing.

    I have switched parties, so to speak, more than once.  

    DH did switch the parties. He says J. Carter was a reason he become republican LOL

  • annabl1970
    October 8, 2012 at 2:17 PM


    Quoting Stephanie329:

    No way would I engage my in-laws, particularly my FIL. He is of the assumption that laws should be bible based.  LOL No way


  • annabl1970
    October 8, 2012 at 2:22 PM

    I know some people, who are very closed-minded. I discuss with them only weather related topics.

    I could NOT even speak about food with one lady. It didn't go good LOL She refused to eat this "because it's ...food of the ..." or "Americans shouldn't eat that because, it's was brought here from... " and blah blah blah. eye rolling

    Quoting Peanutx3:

    I refuse to talk politics with my in-laws.  We are on such opposite pages it really wouldn't go over well.  My in-laws are pretty closed minded.


  • Peanutx3
    October 8, 2012 at 2:22 PM

    LOL. 

    Quoting annabl1970:

    I know some people, who are very closed-minded. I discuss with them only weather related topics.

    I could NOT even speak about food with one lady. It didn't go good LOL She refused to eat this "because it's ...food of the ..." or "Americans shouldn't eat that because, it's was brought here from... " and blah blah blah. eye rolling

    Quoting Peanutx3:

    I refuse to talk politics with my in-laws.  We are on such opposite pages it really wouldn't go over well.  My in-laws are pretty closed minded.



  • annabl1970
    October 8, 2012 at 2:24 PM

    You both have different views on politics? :)

    Quoting FrogSalad:

    My FIL tries to draw me in but I'm adept at deflecting his attempts.

    When all else fails, I just say that I don't discuss politics and then change the subject.


  • annabl1970
    October 8, 2012 at 2:25 PM

    good

    Quoting EireLass:

    I don't get involved. My husband and his parents have very different political views. They talk about it, but they're all very loving and mature, so it never gets ugly.


  • annabl1970
    October 8, 2012 at 2:26 PM

    But they don't think, their beliefs are lies.

    Quoting futureshock:

    It is difficult to talk to them if all of their beliefs are based on lies.