futureshock
Shocking Teachers' Views on Bullying
August 8, 2012 at 11:00 AM

Recently I had the opportunity to discuss the subject of bullying with several teachers. I was surprised by their reaction when I brought the subject up.  All of them had the same response, they said bullying has gone on for decades, was a normal part of life, and not something which they had the power to control/stop.

I am not saying that every teacher on the planet shares their views. 

The teachers with whom I was discussing this subject were from different states and towns, which gave me the impression that their views were shared by other teachers across state/town lines.

My questions are these:

Why are (some) teachers' views on bullying so drastically different than those of the general public?

Why do they not see the danger inherent in bullying and the severe damage it does to some children?

Why do they think they are powerless to intervene when they are right there, on the front lines of the bully/victim interaction?



Replies

  • futureshock
    August 8, 2012 at 11:01 AM

    More info on this question, some of the teachers said they do not see the bullying.

    Why do they think they are powerless to intervene when they are right there, on the front lines of the bully/victim interaction?

  • futureshock
    August 8, 2012 at 11:01 AM

    I am hoping teachers will see this and respond.

  • Euphoric
    August 8, 2012 at 11:03 AM

     That's really really sad. If I was a teacher I would do everything in my powe to help the bullied.

  • smem24
    by smem24
    August 8, 2012 at 11:03 AM

    I think some of them just don't want to deal with it. It's sad that some schools let this go on and something drastic has to happen to the child being bullied.

  • Euphoric
    August 8, 2012 at 11:04 AM

     That's a good question, I wish I had an answer.,

    Quoting futureshock:

    More info on this question, some of the teachers said they do not see the bullying.

    Why do they think they are powerless to intervene when they are right there, on the front lines of the bully/victim interaction?

     

  • Euphoric
    August 8, 2012 at 11:09 AM

    When I was in middle school, I started getting bullied severely. I told the teachers and principal what was going on, and so they arranged a meeting with my parents. Well instead of trying to help , they asked my parents if there was abuse at home, they never brought up the bullying at school. The bullying only got worse after that, and I finally switched school.

  • PortiaRose
    August 8, 2012 at 11:12 AM
    Its cuz of everything being fucked these days. If I was a teacher, I would tell the little pricks to shut the fuck up and sit the fuck down. That during this time, I'm the boss of you, and you will do what I say or you won't be in my class...

    BUT.

    I would get a whiny ass call from parents. "Why are you talking to my kid like that?? I'm sure he's not doing it to bother you.... those kids are just being senseitive...."

    Bullshit like that. So what dod you do??
  • wickedfiress
    August 8, 2012 at 11:12 AM
    Not a teacher, but going to answer the post anyway.

    I think part of the bullying issue us that people define "bullying" differently. Some think it's physical, some think it's emotional, and in addition to those aspects, the amount if teasing or physical interaction that occurs plays into the definition.

    I personally would not define one instance of name calling as bullying, while others may. This is perhaps why some teachers say they aren't seeing it.


    I also think parents need to have frequent open communication with thier children about their feelings and how to own and handle their emotions.
  • eema.gray
    August 8, 2012 at 11:17 AM

    Not a teacher either but I suspect that part of the problem is a perception by teachers that children lose their ability to feel empathy within a year or two of entering the school system.  If you assume that the majority of students in your class lack empathy towards their classmates, it follows that bullying will ensue and be pretty much unavoidable.  But if you assume that the majority of students in your class have empathy, you can work to bring that out in your classroom and prevent most cases of bullying before they even start.

  • sweet-a-kins
    August 8, 2012 at 12:00 PM

     They are jaded...they see the same thing year in, year out....it FEELS like a never ending cycle..

    The way those in retail get jaded that every return is a LIE of a reason