Tween Titans

M4LG5
using more vocabulary
by M4LG5
October 6, 2012 at 1:28 PM
The parent-teacher conference for my girls.went great. They are all doing really well. My tween's teacher would like to see her write more....using more vocabulary especially in writing. She is "on track" but she sees potential in her to do better. Btw....I'm glad her teacher isn't just focusing on grade level but, instead, her potential.

Any suggestions of things I can do at home with her?

Replies

  • psych_mom
    October 6, 2012 at 1:59 PM

    Hmmm... You could look over her vocab words each week and when you are having conversations with her have her incorporate the words into the conversations. You could also have her build her vacab skills by using the words from previous weeks as well. Maybe have her occasionally retell a story by using new words, or have her make up stories using new words. I found that extra reading helped me build my vacab when I was younger, but I always got made fun of because I used words that no one else used.... so there is a draw back, lol.

  • wenchmommy381
    October 6, 2012 at 2:09 PM

    I have found that modeling solid vocabulary helps the most. My husband and I are well-read and well-educated, and we make sure to speak that way to and around our children. Too many kids live monosyllabic lives (Oh. Em. Gee. Guess. What?) because they do not talk to adults enough. Also, watching TV that doesn't rely on the vernacular, even if that is background noise to my kids, helps them. My 4 year old uses the word 'parched' appropriately. 

  • Barabell
    October 8, 2012 at 9:38 AM

    Maybe a pocket Thesaurus in her backpack might help?

    It's funny that you ask because my son and I were just talking about this yesterday. His English teacher is working on the same things with her kids. I did not think of a Thesaurus at the time, but I'm starting to think he might benefit from one too. We just talked about how describing things in greater detail can create a better picture in the reader's mind, and we talked about how authors in books that he would read do the same. I explained how usually paragraphs at the start of a story are long because they are describing the setting, but usually as a story goes on and there is more action and more dialogue, then the paragraphs are shorter and more to the point.

  • Barabell
    October 8, 2012 at 9:41 AM


    Quoting wenchmommy381:

    I have found that modeling solid vocabulary helps the most. My husband and I are well-read and well-educated, and we make sure to speak that way to and around our children. Too many kids live monosyllabic lives (Oh. Em. Gee. Guess. What?) because they do not talk to adults enough. Also, watching TV that doesn't rely on the vernacular, even if that is background noise to my kids, helps them. My 4 year old uses the word 'parched' appropriately. 

    I agree that expanding their vocabulary helps, and using a variety of words at home helps. At the same time, I think kids need a little direction on how to write those descriptive words into a story. My son speaks a lot better than how he writes. I hope eventually his writing improves.

  • jaimestewart
    October 19, 2012 at 8:51 PM

    I recommend reading vocabulary sentences for people (especially tweens) who are looking to build their vocabulary. Studies have shown that reading words in context helps far more than a standard dictionary and thesaurus. 

    Here's the site: http://wordsinasentence.com 

  • TwinSoccerMom
    October 19, 2012 at 9:20 PM

    Read, read, read.  One of the best ways to build vocabulary is to read often.  Parental modeling like someone else mentioned is also very important but if you are already doing that (and it sounds like you are) then encourage her to read as often as possible. If she is unsure of words encourage her to ask or look them up.

  • M4LG5
    by M4LG5
    October 19, 2012 at 9:26 PM
    So, the other day my daughter and I "challenged" each other. I wrote a simple 5 word sentence. We took turns using descriptive words to expand the sentence. She actually had a lot of fun so I'm going to do that more often.
  • M4LG5
    by M4LG5
    October 19, 2012 at 9:27 PM
    Thanks. I will look into this when I get on a computer.

    Quoting jaimestewart:

    I recommend reading vocabulary sentences for people (especially tweens) who are looking to build their vocabulary. Studies have shown that reading words in context helps far more than a standard dictionary and thesaurus. 

    Here's the site: http://wordsinasentence.com 

  • kmrtigger
    October 19, 2012 at 9:49 PM


    Quoting M4LG5:

    So, the other day my daughter and I "challenged" each other. I wrote a simple 5 word sentence. We took turns using descriptive words to expand the sentence. She actually had a lot of fun so I'm going to do that more often.

    Great idea.

  • kmrtigger
    October 19, 2012 at 9:51 PM

    I am putting one in the boys stocking this year as a stocking stuffer. I have noticed they need one now that they are getting older. And I think this is a wonderful suggestion as well.

    Quoting Barabell:

    Maybe a pocket Thesaurus in her backpack might help?

    It's funny that you ask because my son and I were just talking about this yesterday. His English teacher is working on the same things with her kids. I did not think of a Thesaurus at the time, but I'm starting to think he might benefit from one too. We just talked about how describing things in greater detail can create a better picture in the reader's mind, and we talked about how authors in books that he would read do the same. I explained how usually paragraphs at the start of a story are long because they are describing the setting, but usually as a story goes on and there is more action and more dialogue, then the paragraphs are shorter and more to the point.


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