Happy Homeschoolers

HisBrandy
Homeschooling an Autistic Child
December 13, 2012 at 1:01 PM

I am digging around for some information to help a friend. Conventional homeschooling materials do not always work well for autistic students. What she has tried doesn't seem to be working out so well for them.

 What do you think are good curriculm providers to look at and good resources?

Replies

  • elzingah36
    December 13, 2012 at 1:18 PM
    Well,I've been homeschooling my autistic son for the past 3 1/2-4 years now. What I have found is no "traditional" curriculum is going to have much of an effect on autistics because that's not how most are "wired". I actually do the "un-schooling" method. Each school day he picks what we're going to learn about. I guess technically I also throw in some unit studies methods in there as well. Each week he picks from the jar(all his ideas) and we work with that. Like this past week,he wants to learn more about the planets aligning and the solar system in general. So,I make a whole week of lesson plans math,spelling,science,&whatnot around that. Its fun not only for him but myself as well. I do this with the other two children as well. Ben is 15 (my autistic one) and really responds to this way of relaxed learning. Unfortunately,most autistic children don't respond to normal curriculum or teaching. Parents gotta get creative and figure out what their child truly responds to IMO.
    Tell your friend to relax and have fun with it....don't make this an unpleasant experience for her or her child by having strict set curriculum or teaching methods. Good luck to her,she'll be fine :)
  • HisBrandy
    December 13, 2012 at 1:25 PM

    I was thinking traditional schooling would not work out so well. She is worried about keeping him on track. She is still having him tested and feels he needs to work to the standards for that.

    I don't live in a highly regulated state but it seems she has more than we do so I was at a loss on what to tell her about working with those standards. Are you having to deal with that?

     

  • maggiemom2000
    December 20, 2012 at 9:39 PM

    It depends a lot on the age of the child and their ability. I have a child on the spectrum I'm homeschooling. He is 11 and very high functioning Aspergers. I certainly have found some things that work well for him, but it would be completely different if we are talking about a 5 year old who is non-verbal, for example.

    Can you tell us a little bit more about the child? What has she already tried?

  • GELiz
    by GELiz
    January 5, 2013 at 3:50 PM

    Visual and hands on often work best for learner troubles, so look for curriculum that has a lot of physical activitiy, color, music, manipulatives and art.

  • blessedhappymom
    January 5, 2013 at 4:19 PM
    We are using Moving with Math, elemental science, sonlight language arts, handwriting without tears and the You Can Read program from 1+1+1=1 website/blog.

    My son is a very visual learner and all these programs are great and he loves them :-)
  • GELiz
    by GELiz
    January 8, 2013 at 2:00 PM


    Quoting blessedhappymom:

    We are using Moving with Math, elemental science, sonlight language arts, handwriting without tears and the You Can Read program from 1+1+1=1 website/blog.

    My son is a very visual learner and all these programs are great and he loves them :-)

    When you are ready for Grammar and writing check out Applied Grammar as it is very visual.

  • GELiz
    by GELiz
    January 8, 2013 at 2:07 PM


    Quoting HisBrandy:

    I am digging around for some information to help a friend. Conventional homeschooling materials do not always work well for autistic students. What she has tried doesn't seem to be working out so well for them.

     What do you think are good curriculm providers to look at and good resources?

    I like Scardy Cat Reading, I like All About Spelling, I like Math u See, I like Applied Grammar for language structure and writing, and then for Science and History- I think you can do what you want with that as long as you are hitting the subjects that the state would require in State Standards.

    I don't like the programs that decide each subject for you. It might be good for parents who do not know where to begin, but I think its good for kids with disablilities to get the ones that match their ability to process- so you as moms would e experts with that.

    All of the ones I mentioned are visual or story line based, and hands one with manipulatives.

  • HisBrandy
    January 15, 2013 at 5:15 PM

    My friend's son is no longer a young child but a young teen. I should have mentioned that as it is completely necessary when asking a question like this. My apologies for somehow leaving this out.

     

  • tuffymama
    January 16, 2013 at 8:08 AM
    Quoting HisBrandy:

    My friend's son is no longer a young child but a young teen. I should have mentioned that as it is completely necessary when asking a question like this. My apologies for somehow leaving this out.


     




    Assuming he's "high-functioning," I would give some thought to the above suggestion of unschooling with some unit studies. See if that is something your friend can accomplish, and by all means, refer her to the group.

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