Breastfeeding Moms

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LoveMyTiny
The Challenge..
February 14, 2013 at 12:01 AM

 The challenge.. Babies each eat 4 oz ever 2 hours during the day.. Pump 8 oz every 2 hours (or supplement with formula)..

Challenge accepted!

 

(Wish me luck!)

Replies

  • Precious333
    February 14, 2013 at 12:07 AM
    Where did you hear that?
  • LoveMyTiny
    February 14, 2013 at 12:20 AM

     well my twins eat 4 oz every 2 hoursand if I can't pump enough for them (I pump instead of put direct to breast) then I'm going to need to supplement

    Quoting Precious333:

    Where did you hear that?

     

  • Precious333
    February 14, 2013 at 1:39 AM
    Well, for bottles it should be only 2 ounces if you give bottles every 2 hrs, otherwise its over feeding.

    Also, did you decide to exclusively pump?



    Quoting LoveMyTiny:

     well my twins eat 4 oz every 2 hoursand if I can't pump enough for them (I pump instead of put direct to breast) then I'm going to need to supplement


    Quoting Precious333:

    Where did you hear that?

     


  • Precious333
    February 14, 2013 at 1:45 AM
    Oh, and good luck :) that is quite a Challenge :)
  • LoveMyTiny
    February 14, 2013 at 2:38 AM

     They weren't gaining enough nor were they satisfied after feedings, so my pedi told me to bump them up. They usually eat 3-3 1/2, but occasionally 4, I think they were going through a growth spurt

    Kinda, they weren't getting enough when directly to breast, I pumped with my first because he couldn't latch, but with my twins it's just more of a preference I guess, and I like knowing how much they eat/how often.

    Quoting Precious333:

    Well, for bottles it should be only 2 ounces if you give bottles every 2 hrs, otherwise its over feeding.

    Also, did you decide to exclusively pump?



    Quoting LoveMyTiny:

     well my twins eat 4 oz every 2 hoursand if I can't pump enough for them (I pump instead of put direct to breast) then I'm going to need to supplement


    Quoting Precious333:

    Where did you hear that?

     


     

  • LoveMyTiny
    February 14, 2013 at 2:39 AM

     Thank you, I think the only reason I'm able to keep up is because they go longer between night feedings so I'm able to pump a bit more

    Quoting Precious333:

    Oh, and good luck :) that is quite a Challenge :)

     

  • gdiamante
    February 14, 2013 at 3:12 AM


    Quoting LoveMyTiny:

     They weren't gaining enough

    Just so we have the data, what was the gain rate? What's expected is 4 ounces per week average.

    nor were they satisfied after feedings, 

    "Satisfied" is a dirty word not to be used with nurslings. **grin** Their job is to NEVER be satisfied even if they got three gallons at a sitting.

    How were the dipes looking?

    so my pedi told me to bump them up. They usually eat 3-3 1/2, but occasionally 4, I think they were going through a growth spurt

    Kinda, they weren't getting enough when directly to breast, I pumped with my first because he couldn't latch, but with my twins it's just more of a preference I guess, and I like knowing how much they eat/how often.

  • LoveMyTiny
    February 14, 2013 at 5:31 PM

     At 5 days old they lost 2 more oz.. and 3-4 wet diapers 2 dirty.

    Quoting gdiamante:

     

    Quoting LoveMyTiny:

     They weren't gaining enough

    Just so we have the data, what was the gain rate? What's expected is 4 ounces per week average.

    nor were they satisfied after feedings, 

    "Satisfied" is a dirty word not to be used with nurslings. **grin** Their job is to NEVER be satisfied even if they got three gallons at a sitting.

    How were the dipes looking?

    so my pedi told me to bump them up. They usually eat 3-3 1/2, but occasionally 4, I think they were going through a growth spurt

    Kinda, they weren't getting enough when directly to breast, I pumped with my first because he couldn't latch, but with my twins it's just more of a preference I guess, and I like knowing how much they eat/how often.

     

  • mamabens
    February 14, 2013 at 5:35 PM

    That's way overfeeding!! babies don't need more than an ounce per hour, so no more than 2 ounces every 2 hrs.(Just becuase they CAN eat that much doesn't mean they should..I CAN eat 2 big macs but I don't NEED them) Bottles should also be fed slowly, baby sitting up, bottle paralell to the floor, & burped after every ounce.

  • mamabens
    February 14, 2013 at 5:48 PM

    http://kellymom.com/bf/pumpingmoms/pumping/exclusive-pumping/

    Exclusive Pumping – The Best… Expressed!

    March 20, 2012. Posted in: Mother-2-Mother.com,Pumping issues

    (aka: everything you wanted to know about exclusive pumping but didn’t know who to ask!)

    Reprinted from Mother-2-Mother.com (2000-2006), with permission from the author, Paula Y.

    A note about exclusive pumping:

    There are occasions that arise which may prevent a mom from being able to nurse her baby. A mother who has a baby who cannot or will not latch, for whatever reason, may assume there is no choice but for her to use infant formula. There is another option however, and one that doesn’t seem to get the support or acknowledgment it deserves – exclusively pumping, also known as “EPing“.

    In most cases, a mother who has made the decision to exclusively pump has not done so “lightly”. She is aware of the irreplaceable benefits of her milk, and she wants her baby to have the best, so the most logical conclusion for her is to pump and provide her milk to baby by bottle.

    Sadly, many (including health care providers) will tell mom that this is crazy idea, and “it’ll never work”; “you’ll run out of milk”; or will say “you simply will not be able to keep up”. Without the support and information she needs, a mom may simply give up.

    Those who don’t give up often are faced with other issues to overcome. They often feel like they are in a class by themselves, excluded from the usual groups of moms who typically form into “support groups” either for breastfeeding mothers, or for formula feeding mothers.

    They may feel they must explain “why” they are “bottle feeding” breastmilk – even to their health care providers who often ask.. “breast or bottle” assuming “bottle” is formula.

    While everyone does agree that there are irreplaceable benefits to nursing baby directly from breast, everyone also must agree that breastmilk itself is irreplaceable. When faced with providing breastmilk, or not, then whenever possible it should be breastmilk regardless of the method of delivery.

    There is no room or need for guilt here – the mother who has done all she can to bf “normally” isn’t a failure – she is just doing the best she can in the situation she is in. Mothers who choose to exclusively pump are very dedicated mothers – determined to do the best they can for their precious babies, and they deserve respect and support.

    Kathy Kuhn, RN BSN IBCLC, lactation consultant for iVillage.com, has written a great article on Exclusive Pumping , which explains many of the benefits of “EPing” and also the drawbacks. In addition to Kathy’s article, here are some tips and information regarding exclusive pumping:


    All About Exclusive Pumping and Tips for EPing Moms by EPing Moms

    (italicized info shared by Shanna)

    HOW OFTEN TO PUMP & WHEN?:

    First and foremost – one should have a good quality, double electric pump. Some mothers rent them, others buy pumps such as the Hygeia EnJoye. The quality of the pump can make all the difference in the world!

    A normal newborn baby nurses on average 8 to 12 times in a 24 hour period. Most experts suggest it is best if mom can come close to matching what the normal nursing baby would do at the breast, and recommend she pump about every two hours, not going longer than three hours between sessions. Understanding how milk production works can help moms in their efforts to establish good milk supply. The more frequently the breasts are emptied, the more milk mother should have. Therefore, if she were to pump at least every 3 hours, for about 20 minutes, she should establish and maintain a good milk supply. In the first couple of weeks, she may also want to pump at least twice at night, but not all mothers do this.

    “It’s insanely hard in the beginning but you need to pump every 2 to 3 hours around the clock. Prolactin levels (the hormone that tells your body to make milk) are highest in the early morning hours so mom would want to make sure she is pumping then as well. This is like the 1am to 5am stretch of time. If mom can at least get one pump in during this time, it will really help.

    The main concern is to get enough pumps in per day – a minimum of 7 pumps per day. I will say from experience that when I pushed myself to get in 8 pumps per day, my supply REALLY increased. Most of the time, I just couldn’t push myself and ended up with 7 times. And to create a little bit of sanity, it is the number of pumps per day that you get in and not necessarily the amount of time you wait in between pumps that counts. So, if I needed to run an errand or just wanted to get out of the house without dragging my pump along, I would pump every 2 hours in the morning and then have a window of about 4 or 5 hours in the afternoon to do everything and would then pump again every 2 hours in the evening to get my total of 7 pumps in for the day.

    That being said, I did NOT get up to pump in the middle of the night if my baby wasn’t awake. I thought that was cruel and couldn’t do it! Ha! The sleep was more important to me (especially after the c-section). A lot of pumping is trial and error and this is why keeping info in a spreadsheet (or journal) is helpful. If you start sleeping through the night or going longer stretches and see a huge decline in your volume, you can always set you alarm to add another pump back in. I never had to but this can vary from mom to mom. I did the early morning pump as long as I was up feeding the baby, but if she slept 5 hours through the night, so did I! ”


    PUMPING – HOW LONG?

    Most experts agree that whatever the reason for pumping, moms should pump for about 20 minutes. Most agree its best to pump at least 15 minutes, and to avoid going much longer than 20 minutes. Experts also encourage pumping about five minutes past when the milk stops flowing, often by doing so mom will elicit another letdown, and at the very least will maintain production as well as encouraging increase in supply if needed.

    “The standard advice is to pump for 15-20 minutes. Even if you don’t have milk flowing that entire time, you need to pump that long to get enough nipple stimulation. Also pumping at least 5 minutes after your milk stops flowing will tell your body that you need more milk; thus increasing your supply. 15 minutes should absolutely be the minimum pumping time. I’ve talked to women who only pumped for 10 minutes and eventually started losing their supply. They had to work really hard to rebuild it.”

    Pump Settings

    “More is not better” when it comes to the suction settings on the breast pump. Most experienced moms do not set the pump speed on high, but rather keep it on lower setting for comfort.

    “This one was a BIGGIE for me and I want to definitely pass this one on! There should be a suction setting on your pump and a speed dial. This is very important, the higher the suction does NOT mean the more milk you make. Your pump will probably have a suction setting of minimum, medium, and maximum. I had mine set on medium when I developed a blister. Once it healed, I turned it down to minimum and have never had another blister or pain again. I keep the speed at 3 but if you feel like too much areola is being sucked into the horn, then turning down the speed will remedy that. If you are in a lot of pain and turn down the settings, you might actually get more milk because you are more relaxed!”


    HOW MUCH MILK PER BOTTLE?

    Moms may find it surprising that the breastfed baby often takes less milk in the bottle than formula babies take in. This is because breastmilk is so well utilized by the baby’s body that less is needed. Since breastmilk is so easily and completely digested, the breastfed baby needs to eat more often, but they don’t need as much per bottle.

    When a baby is nursed from the breast, research shows us that baby will vary their intake of milk from feeding to feeding, and the length of time at the breast doesn’t always correlate with the amount of milk taken from the breast. Overall, the average bf baby takes in between 19 and 30 oz (or 570 – 900 mL) per day (24 hrs), but the amount taken per bottle may vary somewhat from feeding to feeding, just as it does at the breast, depending on baby’s need at the time.

    ” According to the most current breastfeeding research, exclusively breastfed babies take in an average of 25 oz (750 mL) per day between the ages of 1 month and 6 months. This may vary a little from baby to baby, but the average range of milk intake is 19-30 oz per day (570-900 mL per day).

    To estimate the average amount of milk baby will need at a feeding:

    • Estimate the number of times that baby nurses per day (24 hours).
    • Then divide 25 oz by the number of nursings.

    This gives you a “ballpark” figure for the amount of expressed milk your exclusively breastfed baby will need at one feeding.

    Example: If baby usually nurses around 8 times per day, you can guess that baby might need around 3 ounces per feeding every 3 hours when mom is away. (25/8=3.1).

    NOTE: Current breastfeeding research does not indicate that breastmilk intake changes with baby’s age or weight between one and six months.”

    You can find a quick and easy expressed breastmilk calculator here.

    HOW TO BOTTLEFEED

    It is important to remember that it is very easy to overfeed a baby using bottles. This is because the way a baby drinks from a bottle is very different than how a baby would nurse from the breast. A baby cannot control the flow of milk from a bottle thus experts recommend using slow flow or “newborn” type nipples, to reduce the risk of overfeeding.

    The breastmilk should never be warmed in the microwave, since doing so not only creates hot spots that cannot fully be distributed evenly even when the milk is mixed (the heat adheres to the fats which “glob” together, and can result in scalding of a baby’s mouth and throat), but it actually alters the composition of the breastmilk, damaging some of the nutrients. Shaking breastmilk is also not recommended (gently swirl to mix, instead).

    Ideally bottlefeeding the baby should mimic how a mother breastfeeds her baby. The baby should be fed on cue, or demand, and not according to a rigid schedule. Breastmilk digests in about 90 minutes, so one would expect the feedings to be anywhere from 1.5 hrs to 3 hours apart. (younger babies often need to eat more frequently than older babies).

    The bottle should be offered gently, in a non-stressful manner, with the baby drawing the nipple into the mouth. The type of bottle or nipple is not as important as the manner in which the bottle is offered. A typical nursing session lasts about 15 to 20 min, and care should be taken to allow baby to take his/her time to drink the bottle, not “rushing” through a feeding as quickly as possible. Changing position mid-way through a feeding is often recommended, as is holding baby is a more upright position. Propping a bottle is also not recommended.


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