Breastfeeding Moms

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vinalex0581
I honestly believe that this is out of line and that forumla companies shouldn't be printing this on their boxes.
August 4, 2012 at 11:24 PM

I bought formula about a month ago.

Not that I need to explain myself but I will anyway.

I was having problems breastfeeding my son, who's a month and a week old.

I started EBF when he turned 2 weeks.

So anyways, I bought formula as a back up in case I couldn't BF.

Well, last week, I read on the box that it said: "breastfeeding is the best."

Even though that I now EBF, I still find that offensive.

Here's why:

there are mothers out there who try like hell to bf but can't because of medical reasons or maybe because they aren't producing enough.

whatever the case may be, i feel that is a really shitty thing to put on a box of forumla.

i feel that it would make a mother feel shitty about having to use the formula.

it's bad enough that they feel like a failure because their body failed at being about to bf but now they have to put up with society having to remind her all of the time how SHE is a shitty mom because SHE failed at being able to breastfeed.

i honestly think that it's out of line and that the Enfamil company has no right printing that on their boxes.

even if nothing was wrong with her and she just decided that she didn't want to bf, who the hell cares!! that's her decision, why cause her to feel guilty about that shit??

i can understand how it would be ok to encourage her to bf but if she doesn't want to or can't then just respect it. but don't rub it in her face.

the thing that i don't understand is: why would a formula company try to encourage mothers to breastfeed? they would be losing money that way.

it's like the cigarette company printing on each pack of cigarettes that smoking is bad and you shouldn't do it.

why would they try to encourage that? they are the ones that would be losing out on money. I was going to take a picture of it to post on here but i gave the box away to my neighbor because her co-worker formula feeds her week old daughter, so i gave it away.

Replies

  • MaryJarrett
    August 5, 2012 at 10:26 AM
    They should watch their language!!

    I agree completely with larissalarie & gdiamante among others!

    http://www.bobrow.net/kimberly/birth/BFLanguage.html


    " "The truth is, breastfeeding is nothing more than normal. Artificial feeding, which is neither the same nor superior, is therefore deficient, incomplete, and inferior. These are difficult words, but they have an appropriate place in our vocabulary."

    The lactation consultant says, "You have the best chance to provide your baby with the best possible start in life, through the special bond of breastfeeding. The wonderful advantages to you and your baby will last a lifetime." And then the mother bottlefeeds. Why?

    In part because that sales pitch could just as easily have come from a commercial baby milk pamphlet. When our phrasing and that of the baby milk industry are interchangeable, one of us is going about it wrong...and it probably isn't the multinationals. Here is some of the language that I think subverts our good intentions every time we use it.

    Best possible, ideal, optimal, perfect. Are you the best possible parent? Is your home life ideal? Do you provide optimal meals? Of course not. Those are admirable goals, not minimum standards. Let's rephrase. Is your parenting inadequate? Is your home life subnormal? Do you provide deficient meals? Now it hurts. You may not expect to be far above normal, but you certainly don't want to be below normal.

    When we (and the artificial milk manufacturers) say that breastfeeding is the best possible way to feed babies because it provides their ideal food, perfectly balanced for optimal infant nutrition, the logical response is, "So what?" Our own experience tells us that optimal is not necessary. Normal is fine, and implied in this language is the absolute normalcy--and thus safety and adequacy--of artificial feeding. The truth is, breastfeeding is nothing more than normal. Artificial feeding, which is neither the same nor superior, is therefore deficient, incomplete, and inferior. Those are difficult words, but they have an appropriate place in our vocabulary.

    Advantages. When we talk about the advantages of breastfeeding--the "lower rates" of cancer, the "reduced risk" of allergies, the "enhanced" bonding, the "stronger" immune system--we reinforce bottlefeeding yet again as the accepted, acceptable norm.

    Health comparisons use a biological, not cultural, norm, whether the deviation is harmful or helpful. Smokers have higher rates of illness; increasing prenatal folic acid may reduce fetal defects. Because breastfeeding is the biological norm, breastfed babies are not "healthier;" artificially-fed babies are ill more often and more seriously. Breastfed babies do not "smell better;" artificial feeding results in an abnormal and unpleasant odor that reflects problems in an infant's gut. We cannot expect to create a breastfeeding culture if we do not insist on a breastfeeding model of health in both our language and our literature.

    We must not let inverted phrasing by the media and by our peers go unchallenged. When we fail to describe the hazards of artificial feeding, we deprive mothers of crucial decision-making information. The mother having difficulty with breastfeeding may not seek help just to achieve a "special bonus;" but she may clamor for help if she knows how much she and her baby stand to lose. She is less likely to use artificial milk just "to get him used to a bottle" if she knows that the contents of that bottle cause harm.

    Nowhere is the comfortable illusion of bottlefed normalcy more carefully preserved than in discussions of cognitive development. When I ask groups of health professionals if they are familiar with the study on parental smoking and IQ (1), someone always tells me that the children of smoking mothers had "lower IQs." When I ask about the study of premature infants fed either human milk or artificial milk (2), someone always knows that the breastmilk-fed babies were "smarter." I have never seen either study presented any other way by the media--or even by the authors themselves. Even health professionals are shocked when I rephrase the results using breastfeeding as the norm: the artificially-fed children, like children of smokers, had lower IQs.

    Inverting reality becomes even more misleading when we use percentages, because the numbers change depending on what we choose as our standard. If B is 3/4 of A, then a is 4/3 of B. Choose A as the standard, and B is 25% less. Choose B as the standard, and A is 33 1/3% more. Thus, if an item costing 100 units is put on sale for "25% less,"the price becomes 75. When the sale is over, and the item is marked back up, it must be marked up 33 1/3% to get the price up to 100. Those same figures appear in a recent study (3), which found a "25% decrease" in breast cancer rates among women who were breastfed as infants. Restated using breastfed health as the norm, there was a 33-1/3% increase in breast cancer rates among women who were artificially fed. Imagine the different impact those two statements would have on the public."

  • ivilayla
    August 5, 2012 at 10:34 AM
    I think its great they put that on there. alot women go to formula because they dont care. Not all but most women give up because they dont try hard enough or just get tired of it.
  • RaLeighsMommy11
    August 5, 2012 at 10:35 AM
    Agree 100%. People who say they don't produce enough are just lazy & don't want to try! & there are not that many medical reasons why you CAN'T breastfeed!

    Quoting MamaNeeNee:

    Boobs are made to produce milk.. Women just don't try hard enough. I don't take offense to it all.



    And it's the truth... Breast IS best.
  • ivilayla
    August 5, 2012 at 10:37 AM
    The thing is though. They can put ''breastmilk is best'' on the formula all they want and no one will give a crap. They will still feed their baby formula.
    Just like putting the warning on cigarettes. Nobody cares and still smokes them!
  • KairisMama
    August 5, 2012 at 10:39 AM
    Eh don't let that bug you.
  • mommyofnoah208
    August 5, 2012 at 11:21 AM
    I think its so formula companies dont over promote the goodness of formula. and give people the thought that they should use formula over breastfeeding. I think its good to promote breastfeeding and give people more knowledge. I think pediatricians need to be more educated to help mothers figure it out. I ended up having to switch to formula with my son but shouldnt have to with my daughter. I dont think they are trying to offend annyone and sorry you were offended.
  • MamaNeeNee
    August 5, 2012 at 11:55 AM
    That's a unique case.. But you did produce milk and if it weren't for that you very well could have bf..

    Quoting Rowdys.Mommy:

    You are wrong... I was totally unable to breast feed... Medical issues and complications from epidural, csection, and internal bleeding had me on lots of medications for a very long time that I could not pass on in the milk and dried me up.



    Quoting MamaNeeNee:

    Boobs are made to produce milk.. Women just don't try hard enough. I don't take offense to it all.





    And it's the truth... Breast IS best.
  • annaica
    by annaica
    August 5, 2012 at 12:02 PM
    It isn't offensive. I think it is informative. Using formula is not like breastfeeding. Yes it will keep your baby from starving to death but the ingredients and the LACKING ingredients show us that it isn't something you'd choose for your child if you knew well enough. Sure ppl have issues that prevent them from breastfeeding but they can choose donor milk or even a wetnurse before choosing formula. It is all about how much you know, are willing to learn and are able to understand as well as the whole way you look at it.
  • birdiemom
    August 5, 2012 at 12:28 PM
    I disagree with your comment, I know someone who wanted to breastfeed, but was grossly uneducated and didn't think she was making enough. She was pumping exclusively, tired and weary and didn't know who to turn to for help. I'm sad that we weren't closer and she didn't come to me, but for all her effort she was not lazy. Now, on the other hand she is getting lazy since making the switch to formula 100% and putting cereal in her night time bottle in an attempts to get the baby to sleep better :-(

    Quoting RaLeighsMommy11:

    Agree 100%. People who say they don't produce enough are just lazy & don't want to try! & there are not that many medical reasons why you CAN'T breastfeed!



    Quoting MamaNeeNee:

    Boobs are made to produce milk.. Women just don't try hard enough. I don't take offense to it all.





    And it's the truth... Breast IS best.
  • aeroslove
    August 5, 2012 at 1:07 PM

    Its not out of line. Its the truth and all women can breastfeed. I dont know the low percentage of women WHO CANT. But almost all women can. Anyways.....

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