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Stacey Campfield, Tennessee GOP Lawmaker, Wants To Tie Welfare Benefits To Children's Grades
January 25, 2013 at 7:38 PM
Stacey Campfield, Tennessee GOP Lawmaker, Wants To Tie Welfare Benefits To Children's Grades



Tennessee state Rep. Stacey Campfield (R) introduced a bill this week seeking to make welfare benefits contingent upon the grades of a would-be recipient's children.
Campfield's legislation, filed Thursday, would "require the reduction of Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) payments for parents or caretakers of TANF recipients whose children fail to maintain satisfactory progress in school." TANF is more commonly referred to as welfare.
Under Campfield's bill, welfare recipients would face a loss of benefits if their children showed poor academic performance. It's unclear how these factors would be tied to one another, or how the children's performance would be assessed.
In a blog addressing his proposal, Campfield calls his bill a measure to "break the cycle of poverty." According to Campfield, education is a "three legged stool" comprised of schools, teachers and parents. He claims the state has adequately held the first two legs of the school accountable, but argues that it should apply more pressure on the third.
"The third leg of the stool (probably the most important leg) is the parents," Campfield writes. "We have done little to hold them accountable for their child's performance. What my bill would do is put some responsibility on parents for their child's performance."
Campfield has been a pioneer of creative ways to target beneficiaries of entitlement programs in the past. He was a driving force behind failed efforts to require Tennesseeans seeking government benefits to first pass drug tests.
He was also the legislator behind Tennessee's controversial and ill-fated "don't say gay bill" in early 2012.

Replies

  • SallyMJ
    by SallyMJ
    January 26, 2013 at 12:12 PM

    Makes sense to me.

    When I taught elementary school (ie, in inner city schools), the biggest problem for my students was lack of participation of many parents in their children's education. Kids whose parents were involved tended to achieve better in school. That isn't the case for all kids there, and that indifference can lead to a downward spiral of poverty.

    A friend of mine made an interesting observation (he is black). He went to an inner city public library, and saw lots of black kids sitting around and playing outside. Inside, Asian moms in that same inner city library were working with their kids on their homework. A huge disparity.

    Any wonder that Americans of Asian descent have by far the highest test scores, college attendance and career success of any ethnic group in the country? 

    Parental involvement in their children's education absolutely is a key factor to their success in life.

  • sweet-a-kins
    January 26, 2013 at 12:18 PM

    Children should suffer because they have bad parents?

    Children with learning disabilities should suffer?

    Why did you qualify your friend as black>?

    Quoting SallyMJ:

    Makes sense to me.

    When I taught in inner city schools, the biggest problem for my students was indifference of many parents to their children's education. Kids whose parents were involved tended to achieve better in school. That isn't the case for most kids there, and that indifference can lead to a downward spiral of poverty.

    A friend of mine made an interesting observation (he is black). He went to an inner city public library, and saw lots of black kids sitting around and playing outside. Inside, Asian moms in that same inner city library were working with their kids on their homework. A huge disparity.

    Any wonder that Americans of Asian descent have by far the highest test scores, college attendance and career success of any ethnic group in the country? 

    Parental involvement in their children's education absolutely is a factor to their success in life.


  • SallyMJ
    by SallyMJ
    January 26, 2013 at 12:45 PM

    Mentioned my friend was black, so his neutral observations would not appear to readers such as yourself as being racist. Obviously.

    It is amazing how behavior can be improved by linking it with income. Works with employees, why not welfare families?

    Please. You really think learning and other disabilities wouldn't be taken into consideration? 

    Quoting sweet-a-kins:

    Children should suffer because they have bad parents?

    Children with learning disabilities should suffer?

    Why did you qualify your friend as black>?

    Quoting SallyMJ:

    Makes sense to me.

    When I taught in inner city schools, the biggest problem for my students was indifference of many parents to their children's education. Kids whose parents were involved tended to achieve better in school. That isn't the case for most kids there, and that indifference can lead to a downward spiral of poverty.

    A friend of mine made an interesting observation (he is black). He went to an inner city public library, and saw lots of black kids sitting around and playing outside. Inside, Asian moms in that same inner city library were working with their kids on their homework. A huge disparity.

    Any wonder that Americans of Asian descent have by far the highest test scores, college attendance and career success of any ethnic group in the country? 

    Parental involvement in their children's education absolutely is a factor to their success in life.




  • Sisteract
    January 26, 2013 at 1:01 PM

    Nice, because we all know that everyone has the inate capabilty to be a rocket scientist or neurosurgeon.

    How about if we tie politicnas salaries to the work they successfully accomplish and the state of the nation as a whole?

    If the kids can't all get straight A+'s- the people running the whole education depts should be fired-

    He!!, they'd all be unemployed-

  • Sisteract
    January 26, 2013 at 1:06 PM

    Kids doing better whose parents are involved?

    I suppose there's never a bias from the teacher's perspective either...for ex, I know that parent  A works really hard with her kid, instead of giving the kid a C+, the B- is given. Hate to tell you, I have seen it with my own kids. 

  • littleangie
    January 26, 2013 at 1:26 PM

    I would support this into law.  

  • Sisteract
    January 26, 2013 at 1:46 PM

    Why?

    Quoting littleangie:

    I would support this into law.  


  • sweet-a-kins
    January 26, 2013 at 2:03 PM

    So it was about appearances? there is no "black friend"...

    or you are stating that black people can't be racist...which is it?

    Why wouldnt it work with welfare familes

    you mean poor destitute families that most times are in dangerous going to horrible and dangerous schools with parents that are working full time low wage jobs....

    Quoting SallyMJ:

    Mentioned my friend was black, so his neutral observations would not appear to readers such as you as being racist. Obviously.

    It is amazing how behavior can be improved by linking it with income. Works with employees, why not welfare families?

    Please. You really think learning and other disabilities wouldn't be taken into consideration? 

    Quoting sweet-a-kins:

    Children should suffer because they have bad parents?

    Children with learning disabilities should suffer?

    Why did you qualify your friend as black>?

    Quoting SallyMJ:

    Makes sense to me.

    When I taught in inner city schools, the biggest problem for my students was indifference of many parents to their children's education. Kids whose parents were involved tended to achieve better in school. That isn't the case for most kids there, and that indifference can lead to a downward spiral of poverty.

    A friend of mine made an interesting observation (he is black). He went to an inner city public library, and saw lots of black kids sitting around and playing outside. Inside, Asian moms in that same inner city library were working with their kids on their homework. A huge disparity.

    Any wonder that Americans of Asian descent have by far the highest test scores, college attendance and career success of any ethnic group in the country? 

    Parental involvement in their children's education absolutely is a factor to their success in life.





  • stacymomof2
    January 26, 2013 at 5:04 PM

    This seriously one of the stupidest ideas I have ever seen.  How about we tie that idiots pay to actually doing something productive with his time.

  • PamR
    by PamR
    January 26, 2013 at 5:29 PM

    I won't argue that children do better when parents are involved, however, you need to look at the circumstances that a lot of these children are growing up in.  Not only are they more likely to attend poor performing schools, they are more likely to have parents with limited education (and therefore, a more limited ability to help with schoolwork), and single parent families where the parent is working and not necessarily home to help out as much.  And if you aren't getting enough to eat, you perform more poorly in school.  This is just stupid and punishing children just makes no sense. 

    What does he define as satisfactory grades in school?

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