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greenie63
When You Are Your Child's Voice, Literally! (piog)
May 15 at 1:27 PM

Being a parent is certainly a challenge, always new obstacles. This has been a difficult and challenging year for  my youngest Anthony, who has been suffering quietly and I mean that literally.

Always the loudest one in our home, but told he is "shy, never talks, in his own world, defiant, rude, or being ignorant." All of those were comments made by his teachers in the past. Last year I suspected something due to possible anxiety and came across this, but was told by his old school that no, he's just going through a phase, he must participate, he must speak or it will affect his grade.

The tears he's cried for over a year that no one understands, that he just can't speak were torture.

Yesterday it all came to light and now my beautiful, intelligent, young man will no longer not be heard, but helped. Our brains are very complex, and there are medical conditions that can be causing things to not work like they should. One of them my precious boy will over come now with the right help, and a very obnoxious, persistent mother who will always be the advocate, and in Anthony's case his "VOICE." With his brother  Aaron, he has progressed with Autism, now with Anthony we have something new called Selective Mutism.

He will excel, and be successful. I have to wonder at times why so many challenges, but we will be strong and face this head on.  Can you imagine being frozen in place wanting to talk, scream, sing, laugh and you just can't only to your family and those your family may be comfortable with.

This is my beautiful boy 

A news report on Selective Mutism 


Replies

  • Christy_517
    May 15 at 1:42 PM
    Would he do well with an AAC device? My son has apraxia, which is different than mutism. It's actually a motor planning disorder. But he's thrived with his iPad and AAC program.
  • Rmlupin
    by Rmlupin
    May 15 at 1:44 PM

    That has to be hard. Best of luck to him.  

  • greenie63
    May 15 at 1:49 PM

    Possibly, one of the communication methods is by writing responses. Glad you brought this up, I'll discuss that at his 504 meeting. 

    Quoting Christy_517: Would he do well with an AAC device? My son has apraxia, which is different than mutism. It's actually a motor planning disorder. But he's thrived with his iPad and AAC program.


  • Christy_517
    May 15 at 1:51 PM
    Good luck with everything :)

    Quoting greenie63:

    Possibly, one of the communication methods is by writing responses. Glad you brought this up, I'll discuss that at his 504 meeting. 

    Quoting Christy_517: Would he do well with an AAC device? My son has apraxia, which is different than mutism. It's actually a motor planning disorder. But he's thrived with his iPad and AAC program.

  • UnluckyCharms
    May 15 at 1:57 PM

    Wait.  What?

  • greenie63
    May 15 at 1:58 PM

    ?

    Quoting UnluckyCharms:

    Wait.  What?


  • UnluckyCharms
    May 15 at 2:02 PM

    Going out on a limb here and risking coming off as a total bitch with my reply.

    Selective Mutism?  Is there anything actually preventing him from speaking out?  Or is this another little diagnosis because your child is a brat and this excuses his behavior?  "Selective" means he chooses to be mute.

    Quoting greenie63:

    ?

    Quoting UnluckyCharms:

    Wait.  What?


  • Anonymous 1
    by Anonymous 1
    May 15 at 2:05 PM
    I think this sounds like another excuse for kids to hide behind. Most people fear being in a new setting or having to talk infront of people.
  • LadybugsMonkeys
    May 15 at 2:11 PM

    Back when my daughter first started playing soccer (5 yrs old) she was on a team with a girl that had selective mutism. She would talk at home, but outside of home she wouldn't. When we started Daisy Girl Scouts, the little girl was in our group. I would try to get her to talk, and use yes and no questions when I needed to get an answer. After bridging up to Brownies, she would whisper to one of the other girls (same one she she would whisper to at school to talk to her teacher) a couple years later we moved. I would run to them when we went back to visit. She is now 16, and she talks now a lot, she is still shy around new people.

    My 11 year old son has Speech Apraxia. I didn't say his first word (dada) until he was almost 4 years old. He is very shy talking around other people have a hard time understanding him. He has been in speech therapy since he was 2 years old.

  • Anonymous 2
    by Anonymous 2
    May 15 at 2:12 PM

    omg this is ridiculous

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