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SalemWitchChild
Want to be a mom to a Neanderthal?
January 31, 2013 at 11:14 AM


I thought this would be a fun topic. We encourage our children to explore the wonders of science daily. Yet we put restrictions on our current scientists, especially when it comes to the topic of cloning.

My personal opinion is that I think it would be a wonderful learning experience to clone a Neanderthal. I don't see how it is amoral to clone something as long as we are not doing it to harvest organs or hurting the cloned animal/human in any way. I guess I see cloning as just another method of birth. I've always said it doesn't matter how you come into this world. What's important is that you are here and live your life in a good way.

Read the article and tell me what do you think?




Quote: Source

Recently, reports spread like wildfire that Harvard geneticist George Church was seeking an "adventurous female human" to be a surrogate mother to a cloned Neanderthal. Church clarified that he was theorizing about the requirements for a Neanderthal clone, rather than actively trying to create one. For now, there's no indication that any scientist is actively attempting to clone a Neanderthal. But a new HuffPost/YouGov poll finds that most Americans are opposed to allowing any scientist to attempt such a feat -- with or without a human surrogate.

The survey found that only 17 percent of Americans said scientists should be allowed to clone a Neanderthal if it were possible, while 63 percent said it should not be allowed. Support for the idea dropped even lower (though not by much) if a human surrogate were required -- 15 percent said scientists should be allowed to clone a Neanderthal and 66 percent said it should not be allowed under those circumstances.

Assuming cloning is done in a moral way (no harvesting organs or hurting the clone in any way) are you for or against cloning a Neanderthal?
  • Only group members can vote in this poll.
  1. 25% - Yes, with or without a human surrogate.
  2. 4% - Yes, without a surrogate.
  3. 62% - No
  4. 8% - Other

Replies

  • stephiebugg
    January 31, 2013 at 11:18 AM

     What exactly would be the point? I mean, so they get this neanderthal and then what? Experiments or medical testing to see how that person is different from us?
    If I were a surrogate mom to a neanderthal, I don't think I'd want that type of life for my child, I wouldn't want him/her subjected to all the medical testing, etc.
    Therefore, I don't see the point in doing it. It's still a person, not a scientific specimen, and once born into our world as it is now, it's not like they will have any knowledge of behaviors and traditions of the neanderthals of the past. Is there anything to gain from doing this, besides saying, 'yes, we did that'?

  • ripemango
    January 31, 2013 at 11:22 AM

    i dont see how such research would improve the gene pool (not saying that it def would not) but w what we know of neanderthals, I question it being advantageous.

    I'm interested/active in genetics research and to be frank, I dislike thinking research money would be used to support this.

  • SalemWitchChild
    January 31, 2013 at 11:22 AM

    Part of it is to say yes we can do this. I don't agree with doing invasive testing. However I do think an MRI wouldn't be a problem. They may not have knowledge of Neanderthal culture but they do have some physical differences. We wouldn't know how much until the cloning is done.

    Quoting stephiebugg:

     What exactly would be the point? I mean, so they get this neanderthal and then what? Experiments or medical testing to see how that person is different from us?
    If I were a surrogate mom to a neanderthal, I don't think I'd want that type of life for my child, I wouldn't want him/her subjected to all the medical testing, etc.
    Therefore, I don't see the point in doing it. It's still a person, not a scientific specimen, and once born into our world as it is now, it's not like they will have any knowledge of behaviors and traditions of the neanderthals of the past. Is there anything to gain from doing this, besides saying, 'yes, we did that'?


  • stephiebugg
    January 31, 2013 at 11:22 AM

     I found this pic of a reconstructed neanderthal child's skull. I thought the child would be odd looking, but not really. Kinda cute. LOL

  • Anonymous 1
    by Anonymous 1
    January 31, 2013 at 11:23 AM

    No such thing.

  • stephiebugg
    January 31, 2013 at 11:24 AM

     But can't those differences be detected just by using remains, instead of requiring a living neanderthal?

    Quoting SalemWitchChild:

    Part of it is to say yes we can do this. I don't agree with doing invasive testing. However I do think an MRI wouldn't be a problem. They may not have knowledge of Neanderthal culture but they do have some physical differences. We wouldn't know how much until the cloning is done.

    Quoting stephiebugg:

     What exactly would be the point? I mean, so they get this neanderthal and then what? Experiments or medical testing to see how that person is different from us?
    If I were a surrogate mom to a neanderthal, I don't think I'd want that type of life for my child, I wouldn't want him/her subjected to all the medical testing, etc.
    Therefore, I don't see the point in doing it. It's still a person, not a scientific specimen, and once born into our world as it is now, it's not like they will have any knowledge of behaviors and traditions of the neanderthals of the past. Is there anything to gain from doing this, besides saying, 'yes, we did that'?


     

  • SalemWitchChild
    January 31, 2013 at 11:24 AM

    No such thing as what?

    Quoting Anonymous:

    No such thing.


  • stephiebugg
    January 31, 2013 at 11:25 AM

     No such thing as??

    Quoting Anonymous:

    No such thing.

     

  • ripemango
    January 31, 2013 at 11:25 AM

    sppph, even on neanderthals I can spot colored contact lenses :P


    Quoting stephiebugg:

     I found this pic of a reconstructed neanderthal child's skull. I thought the child would be odd looking, but not really. Kinda cute. LOL



  • SalemWitchChild
    January 31, 2013 at 11:26 AM

    I'm sure some things can be detected with the bones. I'm talking more about the organs, since we know from the bones that Neanderthals were shorter and more stout. They don't know if the organs were placed or worked differently.

    Quoting stephiebugg:

     But can't those differences be detected just by using remains, instead of requiring a living neanderthal?

    Quoting SalemWitchChild:

    Part of it is to say yes we can do this. I don't agree with doing invasive testing. However I do think an MRI wouldn't be a problem. They may not have knowledge of Neanderthal culture but they do have some physical differences. We wouldn't know how much until the cloning is done.

    Quoting stephiebugg:

     What exactly would be the point? I mean, so they get this neanderthal and then what? Experiments or medical testing to see how that person is different from us?
    If I were a surrogate mom to a neanderthal, I don't think I'd want that type of life for my child, I wouldn't want him/her subjected to all the medical testing, etc.
    Therefore, I don't see the point in doing it. It's still a person, not a scientific specimen, and once born into our world as it is now, it's not like they will have any knowledge of behaviors and traditions of the neanderthals of the past. Is there anything to gain from doing this, besides saying, 'yes, we did that'?


     


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