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gypsy_rose
food portions
December 10, 2012 at 8:48 AM


American Portion Sizes vs. anywhere else

American-ized = Super-sized
by Larry Lindner

Anna-Leena Rasanen had arrived in the U.S. from Finland only eight days earlier, but already she was getting the picture.

"The day we came, we went to a restaurant. First was a huge salad. Then chicken with spinach and pasta. That was huge. I didn't imagine a portion could be so big. Even my boyfriend [who's 6 feet 5 inches and weighs 230 pounds] said that he couldn't have eaten the whole portion."

Sam Moore, a Landover, Maryland, resident, made the same types of observations when he arrived from Sierra Leone in 1998. "People eat a lot more often here, and more in one helping," he found. "It takes a while getting used to."

But get used to it he did. "When I first came," notes the 5-foot 9-inch information systems coordinator, "I was around 165. Now I'm looking at pretty much close to 200. It creeps up on you."

The American Weigh
Moore is by no means an anomaly. Study after study is showing that when people come through Customs here, they customarily gain weight. In one report, it was found that a group of Tarahumara Indians from Mexico put on an average of about nine pounds within five weeks of adopting the typical American diet. (Their blood cholesterol shot up 38 percent.) And in research conducted at Florida International University, young Asian adults who had come to the U.S. from China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Japan, or Korea reported a weight gain of about five pounds not long after their arrival.

If five pounds is typical, Lillian Cheung, PhD, RD, director of the Eat Well and Keep Moving Program at the Harvard School of Public Health's Department of Nutrition, was what you might call super-typical. She gained "roughly 30 pounds in the first year or two" when she relocated to North America from Hong Kong several decades ago (and lost them when she reverted to a more "Asian" way of eating). "I couldn't get full," she says. "I'm used to the bulk in the Chinese diet"— clear soup with a lot of vegetables,' for instance, that lend satiety without adding a lot of calories. American foods, by contrast, provide a lot of calories in just a few bites, leaving your stomach feeling empty even though you've hit what should be your caloric limit.

What You See is What You Eat
Milly Hawke, a Boston-area nurse who first came over from England about 10 years ago, believes that part of the reason it's so easy to gain weight here is the ethic driven into people the world over to finish what's on their plates. Since there’s so much put on people’s plates in the U.S., they're invariably going to end up eating more.

"In particular, desserts are bigger here," she observes. "Huge slices of cake. It's enough for four usually, isn't it?" Hawke notes, too, that "a small ice cream cone in the U.S. is something we'd call an extra large."

Cleveland Park, Maryland, resident Anne-Pierre Pickaert has found the same disconnect in translating the words "large" and "small." "For soda, the glasses are huge," says Pickaert, a native of France. "It's like a vase. I can't see how somebody can be so thirsty."

Portion-size, American style
In fact, many foods, just like people, grow in size when they come to the U.S. from other countries. The American Institute for Cancer Research points out that the average croissant in a Parisian bakery weighs 34 grams, or slightly more than an ounce (28 grams). But at Au Bon Pain, a croissant weighs more than 2 ounces. And at Mrs. Fields, a butter croissant weighs closer to 3 1/2 ounces (and contains 320 calories).

Similarly, in Mexico, a quesadilla filling such as chicken and cheese is typically wrapped in a 5-inch tortilla, for a total of about 540 calories, according to the American Institute for Cancer Research. Here, quesadilla fillings are often stuffed into 10-inch tortillas. (You can do the math.)

And they're cheaper, particularly in fast food restaurants. "Fast food in the United States is probably cheaper than anywhere in the world," notes David Holben, PhD, RD. That and the fact that fast food is so convenient in this country compared to others no doubt influences the quick, sometimes wholesale, dietary acculturation of new immigrants, he comments.

Supermarket foods play a role, too, coming in larger packages here than elsewhere. "A milk container here looks like a petrol container in France," says Pickaert, "even the way it has that handle." In France, the biggest [milk container] you can get is a liter and a half."

"Convenience store sizes [that is, small containers] are more usual in Europe in general," comments Karen Drayne, an American who lived abroad for 15 years before settling in Chevy Chase, Maryland. Drayne, who spent time in England, Portugal, Sweden, and Austria, points out that the all-you-can-eat concept is peculiarly American, too. "I don't remember any all-you-can-eat plans in any of the countries I was in," she says. "In Sweden, there were smorgasbords. But there it was all you could eat of salads."

Calorie Imbalance
Of course, it's not just the huge portions and the huge amounts of desserts and other sugary foods that make it all too easy to put on extra pounds in the U.S. We appear to expend fewer calories on physical activity as well. Data collected in the mid 1990s by John Pucher, a professor of urban planning at Rutgers University, indicate that at least 40 percent of trips in urban areas of Austria, Denmark, the Netherlands, and Sweden are made by bicycle or on foot. The same is true for at least 30 percent of all urban-area trips in France, Germany, and Switzerland. But in U.S. cities, only about 10 percent of travel occurs outside of cars (and buses and trains).

That point hasn't been lost on Anna-Leena Rasanen, the Finnish heart disease researcher, who already is aware of how seductive American portion sizes can be. "I think I may gain some weight," she says. "I haven't found a gym yet."

http://jeffcadwell.typepad.com/the_weigh_we_were/2006/01/american_portio.html

Replies

  • CorpCityGrl
    December 10, 2012 at 8:49 AM

    It's digusting.  If you compare portion sizes from decades ago to now, it has increased as well.  So, it goes to show that we were not always this unhealthy or unrealistic about food.

  • Jaxsonsmama2009
    December 10, 2012 at 8:50 AM
    I would starve in Europe. Lol. My portions are bigger than that but not quite as big as the middle one.
  • shivasgirl
    December 10, 2012 at 8:51 AM

    I know this first hand. We had a guest from Austria, she was here for three weeks and she was astound at the size of the plates we got in restaurants. She got a breakfast sandwich from Jack in the Box and was amazed that there were 4 strips of bacon on it,she said at home there would only be one..same with the meals I cooked.I didnt realize how much more food we consumed until I saw how little she would put on her plate

  • 4noodles4me
    December 10, 2012 at 8:51 AM
    I don't eat large portions really, I get full too fast. Unless its rice crispies I made my kids a pan last week I realized before ds got home from school I had eaten the whole pan lol
  • gypsy_rose
    December 10, 2012 at 8:51 AM

    I agree. I have been trying to cut my family down for a while. I get fighting every step of the way from the kids. 

    Quoting CorpCityGrl:

    It's digusting.  If you compare portion sizes from decades ago to now, it has increased as well.  So, it goes to show that we were not always this unhealthy or unrealistic about food.


  • CorpCityGrl
    December 10, 2012 at 8:57 AM

    I also believe it's what we are used to.  As an adult, we are used to portions that large so we expect it.  For kids though, I think it's easier to change their perception of the proper portions because those habits are not so ingrained yet.  It amazes me because we've been to Europe and we see the portions as smaller, but we didn't actually miss or even notice all that extra food that we would've been served here.  My daughter thankfully eats smaller portions but does eat more throughout the day, so everything is spread out and more balanced.

    I know some restaurants have adjusted their plates for portion control, which is a huge step.

    Quoting gypsy_rose:

    I agree. I have been trying to cut my family down for a while. I get fighting every step of the way from the kids. 

    Quoting CorpCityGrl:

    It's digusting.  If you compare portion sizes from decades ago to now, it has increased as well.  So, it goes to show that we were not always this unhealthy or unrealistic about food.



  • rhope4
    by rhope4
    December 10, 2012 at 9:00 AM
    Interesting but no doubt true. As you can see by my avatar, I am overweight. I have heard all my life that portion control was key, but it is kinda hard to do when everything comes in large sizes! But, I am learning to do it anyway, and I am also walking more since my job is the kind that actually ENCOURAGES walking. Dh got out the scale a couple of weeks ago, and after weighing himself, I got the courage to do the same. More than ten pounds is gone! Not sure how long it has taken to lose it, but that is the encouragement I have needed to stay on track. And I am not even trying half the time! I still eat what I want but in SMALLER PORTIONS. I hope to update my avatar in a few months with a newer, skinnier veraion of me.
  • Anonymous 1
    by Anonymous 1
    December 10, 2012 at 9:00 AM
    Am I the only one who likes the large food plates at restaurants because I like leftovers? LOL
    I've tried cutting down my plate sizes and I'm still hungry at a smaller plate.

    But I also don't gorge myself on hamburgers and French fries all the time either.
  • gypsy_rose
    December 10, 2012 at 9:05 AM

    how much are you hoping to loose? I want to lose 100 pounds. I have even thought of geting band surgery. 

    Quoting rhope4:

    Interesting but no doubt true. As you can see by my avatar, I am overweight. I have heard all my life that portion control was key, but it is kinda hard to do when everything comes in large sizes! But, I am learning to do it anyway, and I am also walking more since my job is the kind that actually ENCOURAGES walking. Dh got out the scale a couple of weeks ago, and after weighing himself, I got the courage to do the same. More than ten pounds is gone! Not sure how long it has taken to lose it, but that is the encouragement I have needed to stay on track. And I am not even trying half the time! I still eat what I want but in SMALLER PORTIONS. I hope to update my avatar in a few months with a newer, skinnier veraion of me.


  • sorcha1945
    December 10, 2012 at 9:13 AM
    If you are still hungry from smaller portions try adding healthier options high in protein or fiber or even adding vegtables or fruit.

    Quoting Anonymous:

    Am I the only one who likes the large food plates at restaurants because I like leftovers? LOL

    I've tried cutting down my plate sizes and I'm still hungry at a smaller plate.



    But I also don't gorge myself on hamburgers and French fries all the time either.

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