Raising Special Needs Kids

LDennany
Mixed Receptive Expressive Language Disorder (MRELD)
December 21, 2012 at 6:59 AM

 My 3 year old daughter, Cara, was recently diagnosed with a sever case of developmental Mixed Receptive Expressive Language Disorder (MRELD).  They have started her in an Early Childhood Special Education program.  She goes 1/2 days, 4 days a week and works with a Speech Therapist 2-3 times a week for 30 minutes.

Cara's problem isn't with Speech or Articulation.  She has a difficult time understanding the concepts of language. I've been told that when people talk to her it's as if they are speaking a foreign language. She is very intelligent and has managed to teach herself colors, numbers, shapes and a few letters. A few examples of day to day "complications"..   Cara can respond to her name when she is spoken to, but if you ask her what her name is she can't or doesn't know how to answer you.  She can point to an object and tell you what color it is but if you turn it around and ask her what color it is, she doesn't know how to respond.

We recently contacted Western Michigan University's Speech Pathology Clinic with hopes that we can get her some extra, much needed assistance.

I was wondering if anyone knows anything about MRELD or the best way to go about teaching her.  I've been trying to find information but it appears as though there isn't all that much info on it out there.

Replies

  • gma12.1
    by gma12.1
    December 22, 2012 at 1:42 PM

    I've never heard of it and so have no information I'm sorry. Here's Bump!

  • midwestmamma
    December 27, 2012 at 9:18 PM

    The WMU clinic is fantastic! I attended Calvin College's undergraduate speech and language program, and we collaborated with WMU students and professors on several occasions. They are up to date on research, and their students will provide evidence-based interventions for your daughter. I know it is frustrating and heart breaking to see your daughter struggle, but if its of any encouragement, it is wonderful that you are on top of things and have her in therapy already! You sound like a supportive mama - and that's going to be your daughter's most valuable "tool" in working towards those language skills of her typically developing peers.

  • Hottubgodess
    December 28, 2012 at 11:49 AM

    I graduated from WMU Psych Dept!!!  And I live only an hour away, with both my boys born in Kzoo!  :)

    What I can tell you is that you will be in good hands.  WMU is where BF Skinner lectured for years (the father of modern Behavioural Psychology).  

    I am not familiar with MRELD, but I can tell you that Mike (my aspie) has processing delays, and I can understand some of what you are going thru.  He will ask "what do you mean" (he is 9 and very bright), so that tells me that either Ineed to slow down or explain it in literal language.  

    ((HUGS))  Good luck!!!

  • DDDaysh
    by DDDaysh
    December 28, 2012 at 12:25 PM

    No, I've never heard of it, but that's very interesting.  My son was something like that when he was little, but I don't think it was this exactly because if you told him to go DO something, he could do it, he just couldn't answer questions.  (He's 9 and it's still difficult for him to answer some types of questions.) 

    Good luck with this! 

    I wonder if something like a reverse PECS system would work with her, where you "speak" to her in visuals.  I suppose she's too young yet for you to be able to know if reading will do any good.  I'm not even sure how you'd go about trying to teach someone to read in this type of situation. 

  • Autiziumom
    December 29, 2012 at 1:08 AM
    Wow! Very informative. My 5 yr old still doesn't speak well. My oldest is autistic so there's a strong influence for her not to speak properly! Thank u and welcome!
  • i.heart.myboys
    December 29, 2012 at 7:31 AM
    Welcome to the group. Though I've never been through this I wanted to say Hi.
  • lifeisajoy
    December 29, 2012 at 7:36 AM

    Hugs! Don't know much about that and glad looking into the other Clinic! Hope they help 

Raising Special Needs Kids