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OT: Mom Fights for Her Daughter's Right to Wear a 'Boy' T-Shirt
July 16 at 1:25 PM

Mom Fights for Her Daughter's Right to Wear a 'Boy' T-Shirt

by Maressa Brown

little girl looking at beeker The praises of a New Jersey mom named Lisa Ryder should be sung far and wide today, after she jumped to her daughter's defense via social media. You see, her 9-year-old "loves science; She especially enjoys learning about ocean life and outer space. She has read more books on sharks than I ever knew existed, follows NASA news, and hopes to be an astronaut one day."

But when she and her daughter were flipping through the Land's End catalog, they noticed the science-themed t-shirt designs were exclusive to the boys' section. And in the girls' section, "instead of science-themed art, we were treated to sparkly tees with rhinestones, non-realistic looking stars, and a design featuring a dog dressed like a princess and wearing a tutu." In turn, Ryder took to Land's End's Facebook page to post a passionate letter about the experience.

Check out her kick-butt closing:

My daughter is mighty and she loves science. And until you recognize that it's not only boys that can fit that description, I'm afraid our family will no longer be shopping in your stores.

You go, mama! Not only does Ryder deserve a round of applause for making a seriously strong case against blatant gender stereotyping, but she also gets a major pat on the back for sticking up for her daughter. 

What Ryder did sets an amazing example for other moms. We should all be this ready and willing to defend our children's passions and aspirations! To do what we can to right a glaring wrong that is making things more challenging or confusing than they need to be for our kids. And to speak up on their behalf so they can be more fulfilled and thrive.

Looks like Lands' End is taking Ryder's beef seriously, responding that they're sharing her comments with their Catalog Creative and Kids Design Teams. Promising! Perhaps by taking this awesome stand for her daughter, Ryder may have very well helped push for an important change that will benefit her little girl -- and others!

Do you think there is too much gender stereotyping?
Are you children interested in S.T.E.M subjects?

Replies

  • abuckalew
    July 16 at 9:36 PM
    My oldest dd loves sparkly stuff but I'm not girly at all! I constanly find myself shopping in the men's section because of this.
  • Mandallyn
    July 16 at 10:03 PM
    I absolutely think there is too much gender stereotyping EVERYWHERE. People even believe that boys are better at math and girls at language, even though those stereotypes have been disproved. Because of those biased studies girls aren't given the same attention because people assume they just aren't as good because if their brain development. Before puberty though, there is little difference in the way children's brains work. I HATE gender stereotyping, it ONLY limits children and does not allow for growth in both boys, girls, or anywhere else a child may fall on the gender spectrum.
  • AutymsMommy
    July 17 at 2:44 PM

    This is nuts.

    She already has the "right" to wear a "boy" shirt. Nobody is stopping the mother from shopping in whatever section she wants. It is not the responsibility of a private company to cater to every single person's preferences - that's why there are options. If I were to google "girls' science shirts" right now, I'd come up with dozens of options.

    I don't mind gender stereotyping. There is truth behind every stereotype. My daughter has had no problem whatsoever finding Marvel t-shirts in girls' sections, for example.

  • mem82
    by mem82
    July 17 at 5:21 PM

    I agree. I thought this article was going to be about a school dress code or something. So does the mom want science themed shirts...girlified? Should it be science themed in hearts, pink, and sparkles? Is that the only way she'd be okay with a shirt? One that HAD to be for a girl? Why didn't she just get the boys shirts? If she didn't want a pink or purple 'girlie' science shirt and she also refuses to buy a shirt from the boys' section, what is the answer?

    Quoting AutymsMommy:

    This is nuts.

    She already has the "right" to wear a "boy" shirt. Nobody is stopping the mother from shopping in whatever section she wants. It is not the responsibility of a private company to cater to every single person's preferences - that's why there are options. If I were to google "girls' science shirts" right now, I'd come up with dozens of options.

    I don't mind gender stereotyping. There is truth behind every stereotype. My daughter has had no problem whatsoever finding Marvel t-shirts in girls' sections, for example.


  • AutymsMommy
    July 17 at 5:39 PM

    She could do exactly as you suggest (and buy from the boys' section) or she could simply google. Lookie what I found :)

    www.amightygirl.com/clothing

    Quoting mem82:

    I agree. I thought this article was going to be about a school dress code or something. So does the mom want science themed shirts...girlified? Should it be science themed in hearts, pink, and sparkles? Is that the only way she'd be okay with a shirt? One that HAD to be for a girl? Why didn't she just get the boys shirts? If she didn't want a pink or purple 'girlie' science shirt and she also refuses to buy a shirt from the boys' section, what is the answer?

    Quoting AutymsMommy:

    This is nuts.

    She already has the "right" to wear a "boy" shirt. Nobody is stopping the mother from shopping in whatever section she wants. It is not the responsibility of a private company to cater to every single person's preferences - that's why there are options. If I were to google "girls' science shirts" right now, I'd come up with dozens of options.

    I don't mind gender stereotyping. There is truth behind every stereotype. My daughter has had no problem whatsoever finding Marvel t-shirts in girls' sections, for example.


  • Jenn8604
    July 17 at 5:42 PM
    Yes there is. My ds likes math for now at 6.
  • PinkButterfly66
    July 17 at 5:58 PM

    I agree with you.  In fact I pointed it out when this was posted in another group and got bashed because I thought she was being stupid for boycotting.  Just BUY THE DARN SHIRT!!

    Quoting AutymsMommy:

    This is nuts.

    She already has the "right" to wear a "boy" shirt. Nobody is stopping the mother from shopping in whatever section she wants. It is not the responsibility of a private company to cater to every single person's preferences - that's why there are options. If I were to google "girls' science shirts" right now, I'd come up with dozens of options.

    I don't mind gender stereotyping. There is truth behind every stereotype. My daughter has had no problem whatsoever finding Marvel t-shirts in girls' sections, for example.


  • Leissaintexas
    July 18 at 2:31 PM
    Stereotypes become stereotypes for a reason. Because in GENERAL there is some truth to them. Big muscular men often have dangerous careers, quiet sensitive women often have nurturing careers. If a girl likes science, that's awesome. Frankly, I've never heard girls weren't supposed to be good at science. This is news to me.

    This mom isn't "fighting" for her daughters "right" to wear a science themed shirt. No one is stopping her. Mom is looking for conflict where there is none.
  • Mandallyn
    July 18 at 11:49 PM
    Pastel green, baby blue, pastel yellow, peach. ALL colors that are generally NOT made for boys. Why shouldn't they make such shirts in those colors?

    Why don't they offer a unisex shirt. The very fact that the science is in the 'boys' section alone shows that they don't make those shirts to market to girls.

    Yeah, the 'smart' parents won't discriminate, but MANY don't encourage their daughters to explore. They're complacent in only shopping in their child's 'designated' gender. There are STILL parents who still say, "that's for boys" to their daughters.

    THAT is the point.


    Quoting mem82:

    I agree. I thought this article was going to be about a school dress code or something. So does the mom want science themed shirts...girlified? Should it be science themed in hearts, pink, and sparkles? Is that the only way she'd be okay with a shirt? One that HAD to be for a girl? Why didn't she just get the boys shirts? If she didn't want a pink or purple 'girlie' science shirt and she also refuses to buy a shirt from the boys' section, what is the answer?

    Quoting AutymsMommy:

    This is nuts.

    She already has the "right" to wear a "boy" shirt. Nobody is stopping the mother from shopping in whatever section she wants. It is not the responsibility of a private company to cater to every single person's preferences - that's why there are options. If I were to google "girls' science shirts" right now, I'd come up with dozens of options.

    I don't mind gender stereotyping. There is truth behind every stereotype. My daughter has had no problem whatsoever finding Marvel t-shirts in girls' sections, for example.

  • mem82
    by mem82
    July 19 at 6:10 AM
    But it isn't a company's job to fix the stupid in parents. Why should the company have a unisex shirt or girl's shirt? Because a handful of moms feel like their daughter can't wear a boys shirt? The demand isn't there or the company, which is all about supply and demand, would have them. One blogger with a complaint that riles up feminist does not a demand make. Everyone will be all 'Wah, sexism! We demand equal shirts! And Oh, you, company, have to make them to save face even though you'll lose a ton of money because all of us over here are going to demand this one person have a pink shirt with a science theme but we, ourselves, won't need them. '
    I hate that mentality. As it's been said, there ARE PLENTY of ways to get a girl science themed shirt without every company being forced to conform to the new gender neutral propaganda. Why go to a Chinese restaurant and get mad when you can't get a hamburger. Go down the street to the hamburger joint. If enough people did that, without trying to blackmail companies via social media hype, the companies would follow the money.


    Quoting Mandallyn: Pastel green, baby blue, pastel yellow, peach. ALL colors that are generally NOT made for boys. Why shouldn't they make such shirts in those colors?

    Why don't they offer a unisex shirt. The very fact that the science is in the 'boys' section alone shows that they don't make those shirts to market to girls.

    Yeah, the 'smart' parents won't discriminate, but MANY don't encourage their daughters to explore. They're complacent in only shopping in their child's 'designated' gender. There are STILL parents who still say, "that's for boys" to their daughters.

    THAT is the point.


    Quoting mem82:

    I agree. I thought this article was going to be about a school dress code or something. So does the mom want science themed shirts...girlified? Should it be science themed in hearts, pink, and sparkles? Is that the only way she'd be okay with a shirt? One that HAD to be for a girl? Why didn't she just get the boys shirts? If she didn't want a pink or purple 'girlie' science shirt and she also refuses to buy a shirt from the boys' section, what is the answer?

    Quoting AutymsMommy:

    This is nuts.

    She already has the "right" to wear a "boy" shirt. Nobody is stopping the mother from shopping in whatever section she wants. It is not the responsibility of a private company to cater to every single person's preferences - that's why there are options. If I were to google "girls' science shirts" right now, I'd come up with dozens of options.

    I don't mind gender stereotyping. There is truth behind every stereotype. My daughter has had no problem whatsoever finding Marvel t-shirts in girls' sections, for example.

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