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Bluecalm
Talk to me about sensory processing disorder
June 23 at 3:29 PM
LO (4 years old) has his well child checkup Wednesday and his speech therapist has strongly urged me to request an OT evaluation for SPD. I see sensory stuff, definitely has had some oral seeking and aversion going on, he's very aware of smells and noises, and he's a crasher and basher. As long as he plays hard he does okay with that. He's come a long way. I do give him lots of sensory play and I push him out of his comfort zone.

So what are the benefits of getting an eval and having OT? I hesitate to add yet another DX. He's homeschooled so he won't need to conform to a classroom.

Replies

  • Bethbeth
    June 23 at 4:01 PM

    You can have an evaluation done and see what they recommend. Then ask lots of questions about what they would do and how often. Then you can choose to do it, or choose to say no or that you will wait.

  • hwblyf
    by hwblyf
    June 23 at 4:30 PM

    I am not keen on having diagnoses.  I think they're meant as a shirt tag--a quick rundown on how to get best results from this child.  I think the best thing to do for you child is to keep responding to your child.  I think you can find good advice for things to try from books at the library or on the internet.  Soon you have an entire alphabet of DX assigned to him, and that can start to affect how he sees himself.  PLUS, spd can present itself in many different ways, so you may spend quite a bit of time just having your kiddo and the OT get to know each other.

  • StanleyGirl
    June 23 at 5:39 PM
    going through this with my own son, they were able to teach me so many techniques to help him, and be able to see when he was in need of help. Sensory over load is not fun and to know how to relieve that is important and if your child is a sensory seeker which it sounds like, he needs relief from that as well, things like bear hugs and brushing were such a relief to my son it stopped a lot of tears and took away a lot of frustration it also made it so we could sit a read a whole book instead of just a few pages etc. We treat colds, skinned knees, hurt feelings, why should we ignore sensory issues and not treat them too, if your child has sensory stuff going on then he needs mommy to help fix it
  • Bluecalm
    June 23 at 6:10 PM
    I thought of this just to find out, but then he'd have a DX in his medical record and I think his doctors would be pushing for therapy. We use the same medical provider for everything.

    Quoting Bethbeth:

    You can have an evaluation done and see what they recommend. Then ask lots of questions about what they would do and how often. Then you can choose to do it, or choose to say no or that you will wait.

  • Bluecalm
    June 23 at 6:23 PM
    Yeah, me either. He already has 4 DX, 3 medical ones that were necessary to get for equipment and meds he needs and one for speech. I hate to add another one. I've read a lot about SPD and ideas for activities and games to help.


    Quoting hwblyf:

    I am not keen on having diagnoses.  I think they're meant as a shirt tag--a quick rundown on how to get best results from this child.  I think the best thing to do for you child is to keep responding to your child.  I think you can find good advice for things to try from books at the library or on the internet.  Soon you have an entire alphabet of DX assigned to him, and that can start to affect how he sees himself.  PLUS, spd can present itself in many different ways, so you may spend quite a bit of time just having your kiddo and the OT get to know each other.

  • Bluecalm
    June 23 at 6:29 PM
    I agree about learning techniques to help him, but am wondering if I couldn't research and learn on my own. I already give him bear hugs and brush him and also give him joint compression.

    Quoting StanleyGirl: going through this with my own son, they were able to teach me so many techniques to help him, and be able to see when he was in need of help. Sensory over load is not fun and to know how to relieve that is important and if your child is a sensory seeker which it sounds like, he needs relief from that as well, things like bear hugs and brushing were such a relief to my son it stopped a lot of tears and took away a lot of frustration it also made it so we could sit a read a whole book instead of just a few pages etc. We treat colds, skinned knees, hurt feelings, why should we ignore sensory issues and not treat them too, if your child has sensory stuff going on then he needs mommy to help fix it
  • Mandallyn
    June 23 at 11:23 PM
    What about seeing a therapist who works with children instead of going for a DX? Couldn't a therapist could give you advice for how to help your child without necessarily giving a concrete DX?
  • Molimomma
    June 24 at 7:37 AM

    My son is 4.5 with some sensory issues I'm pretty sure he has mild SPD but like you I didn't get the diagnosis. We do lots of therapeutic OT activities at home. I know he's not severe enough to qualify for therapy but I wanted to help him. Best thing I did was buy him a mini trampoline for the house, he uses it daily. Since OT is the only real "treatment" or therapy it is not hard to do at home as long as you know what makes a good sensory diet for your child. The only other thing that may be helpful would be food therapy if you are having issues with eating/textures of food. I'm assuming you've read The Out of Sync Child, it's probably the most helpful for SPD

  • sweetserenit292
    June 24 at 12:15 PM

     My son also has a sensory processing disorder.   My speech therapist recommended a counsler to help....the first counselor was highly recommended but had no openings....and  the  other counsler wanted to have him tested to see specifically  the areas in which he needs help.  We decided against this.....Mainly because the government is too dang nosey.  Right now he only has speech listed on any documents  and that is ok with us for now.   There are some counselors who don't require testing but we haven't pursued it further.   I ran into another friend who did go through the testing and all they did was had her a packet of information on what her son has but no contacts to outside resources.  She felt completely on her own.   I know it really depends on where you live too.

    When I spoke to the counselor and testing personell  .....they both inquired about medications and if I was open to discussing medicating....  Don't get me wrong there are days where I wish either he or I were medicated because some days are very frustrating.... lol    But, he isn't soo severe that he can't function without medication.  So, we will wait for an opening.  A good counselor would only look at medicating as last resort.    

     

  • Bluecalm
    June 24 at 2:16 PM
    Yes, I really like the Out of Sync Child. I found a lot of good ideas in the Out of Sync Child Has Fun. I've thought about getting a mini trampoline.

    Quoting Molimomma:

    My son is 4.5 with some sensory issues I'm pretty sure he has mild SPD but like you I didn't get the diagnosis. We do lots of therapeutic OT activities at home. I know he's not severe enough to qualify for therapy but I wanted to help him. Best thing I did was buy him a mini trampoline for the house, he uses it daily. Since OT is the only real "treatment" or therapy it is not hard to do at home as long as you know what makes a good sensory diet for your child. The only other thing that may be helpful would be food therapy if you are having issues with eating/textures of food. I'm assuming you've read The Out of Sync Child, it's probably the most helpful for SPD

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