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TJandKarasMom
Math Battles every.single.day..help me please
April 8 at 7:22 PM

Seriously every day math is a battle.  I have tried everything I can think of.  We started MUS recently, DD is 10.5 5th grade, this is our first year hsing.  I have tried many different methods and MUS is finally one that seems to work, but I am wondering if I let her start too far ahead.  I let her start with Delta (division).  She does not have all of her multiplication facts memorized, but I had kind of come to terms with the fact that she probably never will. 

We started the year with a text book, adjusted it almost immediately, then ditched it completely.  We have tried math games, Khan academy, we did a math journal for geometry which she enjoyed but still complained about.  She cannot deal with criticism, every time I try to show her something is wrong she starts throwing a fit.  She won't admit she's wrong, and refuses to listen at first.  I end up engaging most of the time even though I try very hard not to engage with her being argumentative and just rude. 

MUS was working, now she is at lesson 17 and it's getting hard, before this it was mostly review and it went well.  It now takes her an hour or more to complete one worksheet.  She does everything possible to stay distracted and not focus. 

I have her doing review on Mondays, so she does a 'test' from MUS and then something to review multiplication.  Yesterday she chose not to do the math game I left for her, so she started with that this morning.  She was so mad that I was making her review, she thinks she doesn't need it, but the reasonw e are doing it is because she really does need it.  I have explained repeatedly that it is not a punishment, it's supposed to be a fun way to practice.  I have explained that knowing multiplication facts makes division soooo much easier.   

It basically comes down to she hates math and just wants to refuse it no matter what I do.  I have tried everything to make it fun and enjoyable for her, and she still has a fit.  So I hate putting in extra effort when she refuses to even try :(

I am just tired.  I don't know what else to do.  Should I get MUS Gamma (multiplication) and make her do that instead of the division?  Should I just have her practice/review more instead of moving forward in Delta? 

*I am not ok with her just not doing math.  We feel math is too important to not have to learn it.  I also don't want to switch curriculum again, I am ok with switching things up a couple days a week, but I can't keep buying her new curriculum when one gets too hard.

Replies

  • No_Difference
    April 10 at 2:57 PM

    Here's what ours says:

    I, _(Name)_, do hereby agree to the following rewards and consequenes system for hte duration fo the 2013-2014 school year or until my parents feel another system needs to be put into place.
    1. I will begin each school day with 60 minutes of tech time (Kindle or other such devices as they become available)
    2. My teacher and I will negotiate an acceptable amount of time in which to complete an assignment in an acceptable manner
    3. When I complete my task in teh allotted time, I will keep my tech time
    4. When I complete my task in less than the allotted time, I will increase my tech time by 1 minute for each minute under my allotted time
    5. When I complete my task in over the allotted time, I will reduce my tech time 1 minute for each minute over the allotted time
    I will not complain about any lost tech time as I know it is of my own doing since I Have participated in teh the setting of timefor each task and the completion of each task, so the reward or consequence lies solely on my shoulders. I agree to no tech time if I should have a 0 or a negative balance of time, but each day will start with a new balance of 60 minutes so that I can start fresh and experience success

    We then have 2 clauses that were added on about a month after this initial contract
    1. For negative minutes, I owe that much time in "hard labor" (chores from off of Mom's list)
    2. I will have no more than 2 hours of tech time a day. On the occassion I earn more, those extra minutes will be saved up for weekened tech time.  

    Quoting kirbymom: Did you have specific wording or was it just in general?
    Quoting No_Difference:

    It was relatively easy. We typed it up, made her read it outloud. If there was something in it she wanted to change a little, she was given the opportunity to adjust the contract and a new version would be typed up. She'd read it aloud again, and then we both signed it. It is taped up on the wall where she does her work along with a maker board and dry erase marker to write down her start and end times when she starts an assignment. When she's finished, I help her figure out how long she took, and then tell her how much time she gets. That first week was still pretty rough since she really didn't believe me that it was taking her too long to do some of her assignments. Then she got a feel for what my expected times were, and we haven't had many problems since. There have been times where she went painfully slow again and owed me extra chores, but otherwise this process has been working really really well.  

    Quoting kirbymom: I Love your contract idea! How easy or difficult was it to implement your plan?
    Quoting No_Difference:

    my daughter is 9 and we're doing that book this year too. The only difference is, Jamie loves math,  BUT she still likes to drag her feet horribly at times. We made a "contract" which applies to all school work, but it has helped tremendously. She gets an hour of "tech time" - but it could be anything at all that she likes doing - at the start of every day. Each subject gets a certain amount of time. I allotted 1/2 hr for math, even though she gets it done in 15 minutes typically. If she goes over the 1/2 hr, she loses time from her hour - how ever much longer it took her. If she finishes faster, then she gets the remainder time added to her hour. That way, it is entirely on her. Also, I started letting Jamie check her answer with a different color pen, so I was no longer the bad guy. Then we'd go over on the board the ones she did wrong. She'd show me how she did the problem, and we'd discuss where she went astray. It has helped with the attitude immensely!


  • Bleacher-mom
    April 11 at 1:52 AM
    Quoting No_Difference:

    Here's what ours says:I, _(Name)_, do hereby agree to the following rewards and consequenes system for hte duration fo the 2013-2014 school year or until my parents feel another system needs to be put into place.1. I will begin each school day with 60 minutes of tech time (Kindle or other such devices as they become available)2. My teacher and I will negotiate an acceptable amount of time in which to complete an assignment in an acceptable manner3. When I complete my task in teh allotted time, I will keep my tech time4. When I complete my task in less than the allotted time, I will increase my tech time by 1 minute for each minute under my allotted time5. When I complete my task in over the allotted time, I will reduce my tech time 1 minute for each minute over the allotted timeI will not complain about any lost tech time as I know it is of my own doing since I Have participated in teh the setting of timefor each task and the completion of each task, so the reward or consequence lies solely on my shoulders. I agree to no tech time if I should have a 0 or a negative balance of time, but each day will start with a new balance of 60 minutes so that I can start fresh and experience successWe then have 2 clauses that were added on about a month after this initial contract1. For negative minutes, I owe that much time in "hard labor" (chores from off of Mom's list)2. I will have no more than 2 hours of tech time a day. On the occassion I earn more, those extra minutes will be saved up for weekened tech time.  

    Quoting kirbymom: Did you have specific wording or was it just in general?



    Quoting No_Difference:

    It was relatively easy. We typed it up, made her read it outloud. If there was something in it she wanted to change a little, she was given the opportunity to adjust the contract and a new version would be typed up. She'd read it aloud again, and then we both signed it. It is taped up on the wall where she does her work along with a maker board and dry erase marker to write down her start and end times when she starts an assignment. When she's finished, I help her figure out how long she took, and then tell her how much time she gets. That first week was still pretty rough since she really didn't believe me that it was taking her too long to do some of her assignments. Then she got a feel for what my expected times were, and we haven't had many problems since. There have been times where she went painfully slow again and owed me extra chores, but otherwise this process has been working really really well.  

    Quoting kirbymom: I Love your contract idea! How easy or difficult was it to implement your plan?


    Quoting No_Difference:

    my daughter is 9 and we're doing that book this year too. The only difference is, Jamie loves math,  BUT she still likes to drag her feet horribly at times. We made a "contract" which applies to all school work, but it has helped tremendously. She gets an hour of "tech time" - but it could be anything at all that she likes doing - at the start of every day. Each subject gets a certain amount of time. I allotted 1/2 hr for math, even though she gets it done in 15 minutes typically. If she goes over the 1/2 hr, she loses time from her hour - how ever much longer it took her. If she finishes faster, then she gets the remainder time added to her hour. That way, it is entirely on her. Also, I started letting Jamie check her answer with a different color pen, so I was no longer the bad guy. Then we'd go over on the board the ones she did wrong. She'd show me how she did the problem, and we'd discuss where she went astray. It has helped with the attitude immensely!



    I like this. I was trying to come up with something for my kids b/c they seem to think if there is anytime, like taking a break, or they are finished with a chore and I'm not or anytime they are not actively doing something they get on my tablet or turn on the t.v. which ends up making their breaks longer b/c they then want to finish what ever they started.

    I was thinking of having them earn like 5-10 minutes for doing chores, doing school work etc so that by then end of the day they will have about an hour to use. And of course if they get in trouble or have bad attitude they loose 5-10 minutes each time.
  • crystalclear12
    April 11 at 2:29 AM

    My daughter is in 7th grade and we had the same problem. She hates math and it's because she doesn't understand it. I have used MUS and it didn't work very well for us so I switched to Teaching Textbooks, my daugther likes it better. I have slowed her down where she needed and did a lot of repeat worksheets. I have used a web site called Mr. Mcglover. Sounds funny but he is really good. I also used the summer to have her continue to work in her work book so she kind of gets a head start for the next year. I have sat with her and explained that math is important and I can only help her so far but she needs to put the rest of the effort in. Communication with her is key. Don't give up. Take a step back and breath. You are doing a great job. Every child learns different and we have to learn how to teach them. We have our own homework  :) Good luck I am cheering you on!

  • TJandKarasMom
    April 11 at 8:12 AM
    I could never hate you. You have given me nothing but great advice.

    I'm going to look into CLE and see if we can get that for her. I'm just debating if I want to wait to start it until next year or if I want to get her yet another curriculum this year...

    I may look into IEW as well, does that help with grammar? Her actual physical writing is fine, print and cursive are legible (she forgets to cross t's in cursive, but other than that she writes pretty well). But her grammar definitely needs work, and even just forming sentences so they sound right. She just wrote a research paper, it was stretched to four paragraphs and her first draft was really really rough. I went through it with her and she was able to hear some of the things that needed to be fixed, but most of it I really had to point out to her.

    Also, A&P spelling is working really well for her! She should finish book B by the end of this school year, and we may work on C over the summer. I really think it is helping in her general spelling as well. I'm glad I finally listened to you and got it. So I suppose I really should just listen and get CLE and IEW ;)

    Quoting AutymsMommy:

    I have to very gently agree with Mem. Don't hate me :(

    My daughter reads well above grade level. Not all dyslexia presents "classically". My daughter DOES have very serious working memory issues and problems spelling (as well as writing, but is making amazing progress there).

    If your dd is dyslexic, no amount of adjusting curriculum and expectations is going to actually *help* the dyslexia. It will help her, maybe, get through the work at hand, but will do nothing for her ability to learn and work long term. She needs (sincerely needs) orton gillingham tutoring on some level. If you can't afford a dx (and I do know they are very, very pricey out of pocket), there is nothing to be lost (even if she isn't dyslexic) using curriculum specifically designed for children with "dyslexia-like" presentations... the right brain multiplication cards I mentioned, a writing program like IEW, a spiral math program (not like the public school one she was using - something like cle; ime, children with working memory issues, such as your dd is presenting with considering her problems memorizing facts very rarely do well with a mastery program, even if they hate sprial itself), an OG based spelling program, etc. Using curriculum and methods meant for neurotypical children, without an OG background yourself to "re-invent the wheel", will help her learn how to compensate and band-aid the problems, not make them better or easier.

    Again, I absolutely do NOT say this to chastise you... I say it because I wish someone had said it to me, several years ago.

  • No_Difference
    April 11 at 9:43 AM

    we tried something like this before and it failed on us big time, but I think why it worked this time was because we allowed her to have input, and she had to agree to all of the terms, it became something more personal for her. 

    Quoting Bleacher-mom:
    Quoting No_Difference:

    Here's what ours says:I, _(Name)_, do hereby agree to the following rewards and consequenes system for hte duration fo the 2013-2014 school year or until my parents feel another system needs to be put into place.1. I will begin each school day with 60 minutes of tech time (Kindle or other such devices as they become available)2. My teacher and I will negotiate an acceptable amount of time in which to complete an assignment in an acceptable manner3. When I complete my task in teh allotted time, I will keep my tech time4. When I complete my task in less than the allotted time, I will increase my tech time by 1 minute for each minute under my allotted time5. When I complete my task in over the allotted time, I will reduce my tech time 1 minute for each minute over the allotted timeI will not complain about any lost tech time as I know it is of my own doing since I Have participated in teh the setting of timefor each task and the completion of each task, so the reward or consequence lies solely on my shoulders. I agree to no tech time if I should have a 0 or a negative balance of time, but each day will start with a new balance of 60 minutes so that I can start fresh and experience successWe then have 2 clauses that were added on about a month after this initial contract1. For negative minutes, I owe that much time in "hard labor" (chores from off of Mom's list)2. I will have no more than 2 hours of tech time a day. On the occassion I earn more, those extra minutes will be saved up for weekened tech time.  

    Quoting kirbymom: Did you have specific wording or was it just in general?
    Quoting No_Difference:

    It was relatively easy. We typed it up, made her read it outloud. If there was something in it she wanted to change a little, she was given the opportunity to adjust the contract and a new version would be typed up. She'd read it aloud again, and then we both signed it. It is taped up on the wall where she does her work along with a maker board and dry erase marker to write down her start and end times when she starts an assignment. When she's finished, I help her figure out how long she took, and then tell her how much time she gets. That first week was still pretty rough since she really didn't believe me that it was taking her too long to do some of her assignments. Then she got a feel for what my expected times were, and we haven't had many problems since. There have been times where she went painfully slow again and owed me extra chores, but otherwise this process has been working really really well.  

    Quoting kirbymom: I Love your contract idea! How easy or difficult was it to implement your plan?
    Quoting No_Difference:

    my daughter is 9 and we're doing that book this year too. The only difference is, Jamie loves math,  BUT she still likes to drag her feet horribly at times. We made a "contract" which applies to all school work, but it has helped tremendously. She gets an hour of "tech time" - but it could be anything at all that she likes doing - at the start of every day. Each subject gets a certain amount of time. I allotted 1/2 hr for math, even though she gets it done in 15 minutes typically. If she goes over the 1/2 hr, she loses time from her hour - how ever much longer it took her. If she finishes faster, then she gets the remainder time added to her hour. That way, it is entirely on her. Also, I started letting Jamie check her answer with a different color pen, so I was no longer the bad guy. Then we'd go over on the board the ones she did wrong. She'd show me how she did the problem, and we'd discuss where she went astray. It has helped with the attitude immensely!

    I like this. I was trying to come up with something for my kids b/c they seem to think if there is anytime, like taking a break, or they are finished with a chore and I'm not or anytime they are not actively doing something they get on my tablet or turn on the t.v. which ends up making their breaks longer b/c they then want to finish what ever they started. I was thinking of having them earn like 5-10 minutes for doing chores, doing school work etc so that by then end of the day they will have about an hour to use. And of course if they get in trouble or have bad attitude they loose 5-10 minutes each time.


  • kirbymom
    April 11 at 10:52 AM

    This is perfect!  Would you mind if I took what you have here and use it for my kids? 

    Quoting No_Difference:

    Here's what ours says:I, _(Name)_, do hereby agree to the following rewards and consequenes system for hte duration fo the 2013-2014 school year or until my parents feel another system needs to be put into place.1. I will begin each school day with 60 minutes of tech time (Kindle or other such devices as they become available)2. My teacher and I will negotiate an acceptable amount of time in which to complete an assignment in an acceptable manner3. When I complete my task in teh allotted time, I will keep my tech time4. When I complete my task in less than the allotted time, I will increase my tech time by 1 minute for each minute under my allotted time5. When I complete my task in over the allotted time, I will reduce my tech time 1 minute for each minute over the allotted timeI will not complain about any lost tech time as I know it is of my own doing since I Have participated in teh the setting of timefor each task and the completion of each task, so the reward or consequence lies solely on my shoulders. I agree to no tech time if I should have a 0 or a negative balance of time, but each day will start with a new balance of 60 minutes so that I can start fresh and experience successWe then have 2 clauses that were added on about a month after this initial contract1. For negative minutes, I owe that much time in "hard labor" (chores from off of Mom's list)2. I will have no more than 2 hours of tech time a day. On the occassion I earn more, those extra minutes will be saved up for weekened tech time.  

    Quoting kirbymom: Did you have specific wording or was it just in general?
    Quoting No_Difference:

    It was relatively easy. We typed it up, made her read it outloud. If there was something in it she wanted to change a little, she was given the opportunity to adjust the contract and a new version would be typed up. She'd read it aloud again, and then we both signed it. It is taped up on the wall where she does her work along with a maker board and dry erase marker to write down her start and end times when she starts an assignment. When she's finished, I help her figure out how long she took, and then tell her how much time she gets. That first week was still pretty rough since she really didn't believe me that it was taking her too long to do some of her assignments. Then she got a feel for what my expected times were, and we haven't had many problems since. There have been times where she went painfully slow again and owed me extra chores, but otherwise this process has been working really really well.  

    Quoting kirbymom: I Love your contract idea! How easy or difficult was it to implement your plan?
    Quoting No_Difference:

    my daughter is 9 and we're doing that book this year too. The only difference is, Jamie loves math,  BUT she still likes to drag her feet horribly at times. We made a "contract" which applies to all school work, but it has helped tremendously. She gets an hour of "tech time" - but it could be anything at all that she likes doing - at the start of every day. Each subject gets a certain amount of time. I allotted 1/2 hr for math, even though she gets it done in 15 minutes typically. If she goes over the 1/2 hr, she loses time from her hour - how ever much longer it took her. If she finishes faster, then she gets the remainder time added to her hour. That way, it is entirely on her. Also, I started letting Jamie check her answer with a different color pen, so I was no longer the bad guy. Then we'd go over on the board the ones she did wrong. She'd show me how she did the problem, and we'd discuss where she went astray. It has helped with the attitude immensely!


  • kirbymom
    April 11 at 11:05 AM


    This is perfect!  Would you mind if I took what you have here and use it for my kids? 

    Quoting No_Difference:

    Here's what ours says:I, _(Name)_, do hereby agree to the following rewards and consequenes system for hte duration fo the 2013-2014 school year or until my parents feel another system needs to be put into place.1. I will begin each school day with 60 minutes of tech time (Kindle or other such devices as they become available)2. My teacher and I will negotiate an acceptable amount of time in which to complete an assignment in an acceptable manner3. When I complete my task in teh allotted time, I will keep my tech time4. When I complete my task in less than the allotted time, I will increase my tech time by 1 minute for each minute under my allotted time5. When I complete my task in over the allotted time, I will reduce my tech time 1 minute for each minute over the allotted timeI will not complain about any lost tech time as I know it is of my own doing since I Have participated in teh the setting of timefor each task and the completion of each task, so the reward or consequence lies solely on my shoulders. I agree to no tech time if I should have a 0 or a negative balance of time, but each day will start with a new balance of 60 minutes so that I can start fresh and experience successWe then have 2 clauses that were added on about a month after this initial contract1. For negative minutes, I owe that much time in "hard labor" (chores from off of Mom's list)2. I will have no more than 2 hours of tech time a day. On the occassion I earn more, those extra minutes will be saved up for weekened tech time.  

    Quoting kirbymom: Did you have specific wording or was it just in general?
    Quoting No_Difference:

    It was relatively easy. We typed it up, made her read it outloud. If there was something in it she wanted to change a little, she was given the opportunity to adjust the contract and a new version would be typed up. She'd read it aloud again, and then we both signed it. It is taped up on the wall where she does her work along with a maker board and dry erase marker to write down her start and end times when she starts an assignment. When she's finished, I help her figure out how long she took, and then tell her how much time she gets. That first week was still pretty rough since she really didn't believe me that it was taking her too long to do some of her assignments. Then she got a feel for what my expected times were, and we haven't had many problems since. There have been times where she went painfully slow again and owed me extra chores, but otherwise this process has been working really really well.  

    Quoting kirbymom: I Love your contract idea! How easy or difficult was it to implement your plan?
    Quoting No_Difference:

    my daughter is 9 and we're doing that book this year too. The only difference is, Jamie loves math,  BUT she still likes to drag her feet horribly at times. We made a "contract" which applies to all school work, but it has helped tremendously. She gets an hour of "tech time" - but it could be anything at all that she likes doing - at the start of every day. Each subject gets a certain amount of time. I allotted 1/2 hr for math, even though she gets it done in 15 minutes typically. If she goes over the 1/2 hr, she loses time from her hour - how ever much longer it took her. If she finishes faster, then she gets the remainder time added to her hour. That way, it is entirely on her. Also, I started letting Jamie check her answer with a different color pen, so I was no longer the bad guy. Then we'd go over on the board the ones she did wrong. She'd show me how she did the problem, and we'd discuss where she went astray. It has helped with the attitude immensely!



  • No_Difference
    April 11 at 12:06 PM

    Absolutely use it :)  I hope it helps! 

    Quoting kirbymom:

    This is perfect!  Would you mind if I took what you have here and use it for my kids? 

    Quoting No_Difference:

    Here's what ours says:I, _(Name)_, do hereby agree to the following rewards and consequenes system for hte duration fo the 2013-2014 school year or until my parents feel another system needs to be put into place.1. I will begin each school day with 60 minutes of tech time (Kindle or other such devices as they become available)2. My teacher and I will negotiate an acceptable amount of time in which to complete an assignment in an acceptable manner3. When I complete my task in teh allotted time, I will keep my tech time4. When I complete my task in less than the allotted time, I will increase my tech time by 1 minute for each minute under my allotted time5. When I complete my task in over the allotted time, I will reduce my tech time 1 minute for each minute over the allotted timeI will not complain about any lost tech time as I know it is of my own doing since I Have participated in teh the setting of timefor each task and the completion of each task, so the reward or consequence lies solely on my shoulders. I agree to no tech time if I should have a 0 or a negative balance of time, but each day will start with a new balance of 60 minutes so that I can start fresh and experience successWe then have 2 clauses that were added on about a month after this initial contract1. For negative minutes, I owe that much time in "hard labor" (chores from off of Mom's list)2. I will have no more than 2 hours of tech time a day. On the occassion I earn more, those extra minutes will be saved up for weekened tech time.  

    Quoting kirbymom: Did you have specific wording or was it just in general?
    Quoting No_Difference:

    It was relatively easy. We typed it up, made her read it outloud. If there was something in it she wanted to change a little, she was given the opportunity to adjust the contract and a new version would be typed up. She'd read it aloud again, and then we both signed it. It is taped up on the wall where she does her work along with a maker board and dry erase marker to write down her start and end times when she starts an assignment. When she's finished, I help her figure out how long she took, and then tell her how much time she gets. That first week was still pretty rough since she really didn't believe me that it was taking her too long to do some of her assignments. Then she got a feel for what my expected times were, and we haven't had many problems since. There have been times where she went painfully slow again and owed me extra chores, but otherwise this process has been working really really well.  

    Quoting kirbymom: I Love your contract idea! How easy or difficult was it to implement your plan?
    Quoting No_Difference:

    my daughter is 9 and we're doing that book this year too. The only difference is, Jamie loves math,  BUT she still likes to drag her feet horribly at times. We made a "contract" which applies to all school work, but it has helped tremendously. She gets an hour of "tech time" - but it could be anything at all that she likes doing - at the start of every day. Each subject gets a certain amount of time. I allotted 1/2 hr for math, even though she gets it done in 15 minutes typically. If she goes over the 1/2 hr, she loses time from her hour - how ever much longer it took her. If she finishes faster, then she gets the remainder time added to her hour. That way, it is entirely on her. Also, I started letting Jamie check her answer with a different color pen, so I was no longer the bad guy. Then we'd go over on the board the ones she did wrong. She'd show me how she did the problem, and we'd discuss where she went astray. It has helped with the attitude immensely!


  • Chasing3
    April 11 at 2:37 PM

    we are in Gamma, 4th grader, turned 10 two months ago.  He will probably not have quick recall of multiplication facts ever! but I love gamma and how MUS teaches multiplication.

    I think goign back to gamma might be worth it and far cheaper than switchign altogether. I'd get it and go through it quickly. You can probably do a lesson a day - land probably get through the first 10 lessons in a week! He starts at x0, so your dd can probably get through the x0, x1, x10, x2, x5 in a week. Maybe spend a bit more time on the x3, x6, etc. especially since I really like how he shows all the different notations for muptiplication, the fraction equivalents, and the thinking about division like *something* time 4 equals 42, or n4 = 32

    I think starting with stuff that's pretty easy will build confidence and might run her attitude around. This is my first year homeschooling, also came from a terrible PS math curriculum where he learned nothing, and we started at Alpha! But what is awesome for me to see is that now he's willing to try and feels good about himself and there is no feelings of constant failure - so that is worth it for going at a slower pace.

    Also, you can try using the MUS on-line drill page or worksheet generator to go back over the muptiplication if you don't want to buy gamma. I use the on-line drill page as a quick review before we start a lesson. My son seems to be very weak in working memory, so a quick run-through of his times tables on-line helps a lot with getting started on teh lesson. I also have a chart I made up with a list of rules like x2 is doubling, x4 is doubling 2, x9 is the "9 rule - where it starts with one less and added together equalls 9" Or sometimes I'll have him review counting by 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8 before he gets started...

    anyway, seems buying gamma is fairly cheap, and then you can go right back to delta. you can use the on-line worksheet generator too, to make some new workbook pages and re-do some of the lessons in delta she already did.

    good luck!! 


     

  • KaraBethE
    April 13 at 2:36 PM
    I had math problems with my boys just because I am not great at math and have little understanding of most math concepts. I started using Teaching Textbooks about 5 months ago. My boys both like it, don't fuss nearly as much and it is not you teaching the math. Concentrate on what you enjoy and she will respond. Also, a suggestion, if you include her in some curriculum or theme choices you can talk to her about how there are some things she can have some input on in regards to her education but some things, such as math she will just have to deal with.

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