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Honey_Comb
Black History Month
February 3 at 6:19 PM

How are you teaching or including Black History Month to your elementary school aged children? Is there worksheets or a certain way you are explaining it? Maybe a different person every day? I'm looking for some ideas for my 1st grader!


Thanks!

Replies

  • Alyson121
    February 3 at 6:34 PM

    I tend to teach it as a part of regular history throughout the year.  However here's a link to some free worksheets for Black HIstory Month.  You can also do a search for "black history month worksheets" and tons of links pop up. 

  • Honey_Comb
    February 3 at 7:04 PM
    Thanks so much!!!

    Quoting Alyson121:

    I tend to teach it as a part of regular history throughout the year.  However here's a link to some free worksheets for Black HIstory Month.  You can also do a search for "black history month worksheets" and tons of links pop up. 

  • Chillisarah
    February 3 at 7:55 PM

    We started off the month with learning about one of my favorite authors, Carter G. Woodson.  I found a coloring page of him and we read and reflected on a couple of his quotes.   We will learn about a few people each day and I found this website of informational coloring pages that we like:

    http://fun.familyeducation.com/slideshow/black-history-month/60270.html

  • Honey_Comb
    February 3 at 8:11 PM

    Thanks so much!!

    Quoting Chillisarah:

    We started off the month with learning about one of my favorite authors, Carter G. Woodson.  I found a coloring page of him and we read and reflected on a couple of his quotes.   We will learn about a few people each day and I found this website of informational coloring pages that we like:

    http://fun.familyeducation.com/slideshow/black-history-month/60270.html


  • mem82
    by mem82
    February 3 at 9:43 PM
    We don't really focus on color at all. When we talk about such and such being wrote/painted/invented whatever, skin color isn't addressed unless it highlights some part of the story. I think the only way to kill rasicm is to actively teach kids to be color blind. Having a month,does nothing but highlight someone's color,gender, or nationality NOT what they should be known for. Lol sorry, this is my soapbox. Am getting off it. Try superteacher.com.
  • Chillisarah
    February 3 at 11:48 PM


    Quoting mem82: We don't really focus on color at all. When we talk about such and such being wrote/painted/invented whatever, skin color isn't addressed unless it highlights some part of the story. I think the only way to kill rasicm is to actively teach kids to be color blind. Having a month,does nothing but highlight someone's color,gender, or nationality NOT what they should be known for. Lol sorry, this is my soapbox. Am getting off it. Try superteacher.com.

    I think that embracing multiculturalism is a good way to eradicate racism also.  I read this article here on Psychology Today and we discussed it in my Sociology class recently.  Interesting perspective on the topic. 

  • mem82
    by mem82
    February 4 at 2:15 AM
    I wouldn't say we don't embrace other cultures, we simply don't highlight one above the others. Maybe it's easier in areas like ours where we are constantly in the presence of other races, religion,and nationalities?

    Quoting Chillisarah:


    Quoting mem82: We don't really focus on color at all. When we talk about such and such being wrote/painted/invented whatever, skin color isn't addressed unless it highlights some part of the story. I think the only way to kill rasicm is to actively teach kids to be color blind. Having a month,does nothing but highlight someone's color,gender, or nationality NOT what they should be known for. Lol sorry, this is my soapbox. Am getting off it. Try superteacher.com.

    I think that embracing multiculturalism is a good way to eradicate racism also.  I read this article here on Psychology Today and we discussed it in my Sociology class recently.  Interesting perspective on the topic. 

  • elizabooks
    February 4 at 8:38 AM

    superteacher.com was an unclaimed domain link......


  • talktojonell
    February 4 at 8:40 AM
    This is just my opinion, but I think that blindly ignoring color doesn't teach children to be color blind. By recognizing race and ethnicity and heritage of everyone you create a platform for teaching your children about differences.I think we need to talk about our differences under the umbrella of our differences contribute to a greater whole and a philosophy of humanism.

    In reading and when introducing any figure, we do a quick 3-5 minute bio of the person. Their race, any significant about their development. We look up what state or country they're from or their ancestors if known. Two or three sentences about how their childhood may have been different or similar to my kids and call it a day. They may be Norwegian or African-American or Chinese or French. Maybe all I can find out is that they grew up in Iowa and attended the University of Texas. Doesn't matter, just something.

    Speaking as a minority there's no such thing as color blind. Color is always seen. The best you can be is actionable blind meaning you don't actually do anything differently when you encounter someone. Speaking as a human being everyone comes from a unique cultural, racial and ethnic mold. Everyone has things that are intrinsic to their development of personhood that shaped them and colored their experiences (pun intended). Growing up in a rural area, Jewish, not having snow in winter with a large family....our differences are what allow us to bring something unique to the table.

    As far as Black History Month, yes I agree specific months weeks or days shouldn't be necessary to showcase things we should be doing year round. However, they do serve as a reminder to allow us to reflect on whether we're doing our job. Whether it's African-American History month or Autism Awareness week or Nurse's Appreciation day.

    Ok. I'm done with the soapbox for whomever wants it next lol.



    Quoting mem82: We don't really focus on color at all. When we talk about such and such being wrote/painted/invented whatever, skin color isn't addressed unless it highlights some part of the story. I think the only way to kill rasicm is to actively teach kids to be color blind. Having a month,does nothing but highlight someone's color,gender, or nationality NOT what they should be known for. Lol sorry, this is my soapbox. Am getting off it. Try superteacher.com.
  • mem82
    by mem82
    February 4 at 8:50 AM
    I do see what you are saying. LOL I don't agree with some of it, but I understand why you have that opinion. 8) As far as I'm concerned,the only umbrella we all live under is the one called being human. As soon as we catch Bigfoot,I will agree that we can give him a month because of his "different" history. Heeheehee
    *pants the soap box fondly and waits for some one else*


    Quoting talktojonell: This is just my opinion, but I think that blindly ignoring color doesn't teach children to be color blind. By recognizing race and ethnicity and heritage of everyone you create a platform for teaching your children about differences.I think we need to talk about our differences under the umbrella of our differences contribute to a greater whole and a philosophy of humanism.



    In reading and when introducing any figure, we do a quick 3-5 minute bio of the person. Their race, any significant about their development. We look up what state or country they're from or their ancestors if known. Two or three sentences about how their childhood may have been different or similar to my kids and call it a day. They may be Norwegian or African-American or Chinese or French. Maybe all I can find out is that they grew up in Iowa and attended the University of Texas. Doesn't matter, just something.



    Speaking as a minority there's no such thing as color blind. Color is always seen. The best you can be is actionable blind meaning you don't actually do anything differently when you encounter someone. Speaking as a human being everyone comes from a unique cultural, racial and ethnic mold. Everyone has things that are intrinsic to their development of personhood that shaped them and colored their experiences (pun intended). Growing up in a rural area, Jewish, not having snow in winter with a large family....our differences are what allow us to bring something unique to the table.



    As far as Black History Month, yes I agree specific months weeks or days shouldn't be necessary to showcase things we should be doing year round. However, they do serve as a reminder to allow us to reflect on whether we're doing our job. Whether it's African-American History month or Autism Awareness week or Nurse's Appreciation day.



    Ok. I'm done with the soapbox for whomever wants it next lol.







    Quoting mem82: We don't really focus on color at all. When we talk about such and such being wrote/painted/invented whatever, skin color isn't addressed unless it highlights some part of the story. I think the only way to kill rasicm is to actively teach kids to be color blind. Having a month,does nothing but highlight someone's color,gender, or nationality NOT what they should be known for. Lol sorry, this is my soapbox. Am getting off it. Try superteacher.com.

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