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Pukalani79
Does anyone teach children other than their own?
January 26 at 6:29 PM

 I don't necessarily mean as a co-op or anything like that.  I teach anatomy to my three plus two others, choir to a group of 13 and speech to a group of 11 or so.  But that's just once or twice a week.  Does anyone teach other children full time in addition to your own?

A friend of mine is considering taking on another student, and I have been approached about it when we move as well.  I'm just wondering what your thoughts are on it.

Replies

  • debramommyof4
    January 26 at 6:34 PM
    It depends. My experience was not great. It was my sister who asked and it was not fun because she wanted me to teach her at a higher level than she needed and kept making comments.

    I will be helping with my friends dd but she is 11 and her mom will be responsible. I just have to ensure she does her work.
  • KickButtMama
    January 26 at 6:38 PM

    I'm starting to tutor in math to other HSers 

    i would have no problem with taking in another HS'er but you need to have a clear understanding between you and the other parents of what you will teach and how you teach it. It would be frustrating to have the other a parent bugging you a constantly about how/what your teaching. But if you give them a clear outline, like a syllabus, and what they will be in charge of, then it should be fine? 

  • Jinx-Troublex3
    January 26 at 7:28 PM

    I had my friend's DS here with my kids for a year. His Mom and Dad were in the process of a divorce and she had to go back to work. In CA, it falls under the childcare laws so i was not a problem. They ended up moving out of state but he had some emotional/impulse issues where he wa always hurting my kids, not often intentially but still unable to control himself so I would have not had him back if hey had not moved.

    School/schedule wise it was not mmuch of an issue. He was right between my two boys in age.

    You need to check and see if it is even legal in your state. I know some don't allow it. .

     

  • AutymsMommy
    January 26 at 7:59 PM

    I did at one time. I took on a 9 year old (third grader).

    It was a complete disaster. She was too used to being let loose on Time 4 Learning and faking her way through the program. When I finally sat down with her, she didn't even know what the definition of a noun - she had been faking her way through the entire time. She was NOT a bad girl, but her upbringing had been completely different from the way our own household runs - she didn't know how to share, wasn't used to younger children, required my complete attention, etc.

    There are so many things that need to be figured out first, before your friend gets herself into this.

    First, money. How much will she charge? Most people will not pay more than less what a local private school charges. Around here, top Catholic schools only charge $500/monthly, so nobody would be willing to pay more than $400 a month, which is only $100 weekly; generally the parent in these situations work, so you have them full time (7:30-5:40 or so, roughly). The breakdown to hourly is very low.

    Food. In general, the children will want to eat what you serve your own children - everything looks better than what mom packs! So you have to take that into account with pricing. The child I took on was used to processed and fast food, largely, so she gorged on the fresh fruit at my house (a good thing, but it certainly took a toll on my bottom line).

    Faith differences. If you're protestant and teach young earth, for example, or with protestant materials, how are you going to handle a child coming from a secular, Catholic, or otherwise background and mom doesn't want you to use protestant materials with her child?

    Time. A child not used to working with you will require a ton of your time. This is time taken from your own children.

    Also, check your state laws. Many states require that parents be responsible for the majority (51%+) of core instruction.

  • TJandKarasMom
    January 26 at 8:30 PM
    I don't think I would do it. In theory it sounds good, extra income, a friend for my kids....but in practice I see it being a nightmare. Unless it was maybe a really good friend that I could be blunt with any issues with.

    Also, in my state, the parent(s) have to teach at least 51% of the time. So anyone should look into the HS laws if they are considering this.
  • KickButtMama
    January 26 at 9:21 PM

    Lol, we are child-led learners, but I'm a book nerd so I insist on at least having t4l everyday...my youngest faked it for a week - said how he LOVED the program....not realizing the parent can view all scores and tests! He was so mad that that weekend I made I'm do all 7 hours over again. My kids now realize I won't accept less than an 80% - which makes me a traitor to the unschooler/child-led learning cause (*gasp*) but I always hated labels...lol..my biggest concern w/ T4L (other than the fact that it is Not a complete curriculum) is that the student can totally fake it, yeah they might get a bad score but the icon will still be checked off like they finished it correctly. I've complained to them about that.

    Quoting AutymsMommy:

    I did at one time. I took on a 9 year old (third grader).

    It was a complete disaster. She was too used to being let loose on Time 4 Learning and faking her way through the program. When I finally sat down with her, she didn't even know what the definition of a noun - she had been faking her way through the entire time. She was NOT a bad girl, but her upbringing had been completely different from the way our own household runs - she didn't know how to share, wasn't used to younger children, required my complete attention, etc.

    There are so many things that need to be figured out first, before your friend gets herself into this.

    First, money. How much will she charge? Most people will not pay more than less what a local private school charges. Around here, top Catholic schools only charge $500/monthly, so nobody would be willing to pay more than $400 a month, which is only $100 weekly; generally the parent in these situations work, so you have them full time (7:30-5:40 or so, roughly). The breakdown to hourly is very low.

    Food. In general, the children will want to eat what you serve your own children - everything looks better than what mom packs! So you have to take that into account with pricing. The child I took on was used to processed and fast food, largely, so she gorged on the fresh fruit at my house (a good thing, but it certainly took a toll on my bottom line).

    Faith differences. If you're protestant and teach young earth, for example, or with protestant materials, how are you going to handle a child coming from a secular, Catholic, or otherwise background and mom doesn't want you to use protestant materials with her child?

    Time. A child not used to working with you will require a ton of your time. This is time taken from your own children.

    Also, check your state laws. Many states require that parents be responsible for the majority (51%+) of core instruction.


  • jen2150
    by jen2150
    January 27 at 11:20 AM
    I doubt I would. I would only do it if the parent had an unschooling mindset. We use curriculum but are child and parent led learners.
  • paganbaby
    January 27 at 11:30 AM

    How long did you end up teaching her?

    Quoting AutymsMommy:

    I did at one time. I took on a 9 year old (third grader).

    It was a complete disaster. She was too used to being let loose on Time 4 Learning and faking her way through the program. When I finally sat down with her, she didn't even know what the definition of a noun - she had been faking her way through the entire time. She was NOT a bad girl, but her upbringing had been completely different from the way our own household runs - she didn't know how to share, wasn't used to younger children, required my complete attention, etc.

    There are so many things that need to be figured out first, before your friend gets herself into this.

    First, money. How much will she charge? Most people will not pay more than less what a local private school charges. Around here, top Catholic schools only charge $500/monthly, so nobody would be willing to pay more than $400 a month, which is only $100 weekly; generally the parent in these situations work, so you have them full time (7:30-5:40 or so, roughly). The breakdown to hourly is very low.

    Food. In general, the children will want to eat what you serve your own children - everything looks better than what mom packs! So you have to take that into account with pricing. The child I took on was used to processed and fast food, largely, so she gorged on the fresh fruit at my house (a good thing, but it certainly took a toll on my bottom line).

    Faith differences. If you're protestant and teach young earth, for example, or with protestant materials, how are you going to handle a child coming from a secular, Catholic, or otherwise background and mom doesn't want you to use protestant materials with her child?

    Time. A child not used to working with you will require a ton of your time. This is time taken from your own children.

    Also, check your state laws. Many states require that parents be responsible for the majority (51%+) of core instruction.


  • Pukalani79
    January 27 at 11:31 AM

     Great points!

    Quoting AutymsMommy:

    I did at one time. I took on a 9 year old (third grader).

    It was a complete disaster. She was too used to being let loose on Time 4 Learning and faking her way through the program. When I finally sat down with her, she didn't even know what the definition of a noun - she had been faking her way through the entire time. She was NOT a bad girl, but her upbringing had been completely different from the way our own household runs - she didn't know how to share, wasn't used to younger children, required my complete attention, etc.

    There are so many things that need to be figured out first, before your friend gets herself into this.

    First, money. How much will she charge? Most people will not pay more than less what a local private school charges. Around here, top Catholic schools only charge $500/monthly, so nobody would be willing to pay more than $400 a month, which is only $100 weekly; generally the parent in these situations work, so you have them full time (7:30-5:40 or so, roughly). The breakdown to hourly is very low.

    Food. In general, the children will want to eat what you serve your own children - everything looks better than what mom packs! So you have to take that into account with pricing. The child I took on was used to processed and fast food, largely, so she gorged on the fresh fruit at my house (a good thing, but it certainly took a toll on my bottom line).

    Faith differences. If you're protestant and teach young earth, for example, or with protestant materials, how are you going to handle a child coming from a secular, Catholic, or otherwise background and mom doesn't want you to use protestant materials with her child?

    Time. A child not used to working with you will require a ton of your time. This is time taken from your own children.

    Also, check your state laws. Many states require that parents be responsible for the majority (51%+) of core instruction.

     

  • paganbaby
    January 27 at 11:31 AM

    That's my concern too. The parent would have to be on board with my teaching style.

    Quoting jen2150: I doubt I would. I would only do it if the parent had an unschooling mindset. We use curriculum but are child and parent led learners.


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