Homeschooling Moms

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kirbymom
Homeschoolers + College = Capability ??
December 29, 2013 at 3:11 PM

Can Homeschoolers Do Well in College?

It's a more relevant question today since the number of college students who have been homeschooled has exploded. Back in the 1970s, only 13,000 students were homeschooled while today there are more than 1.5 million.

A new study published in The Journal of College Admission suggests that homeschool students enjoy higher ACT scores, grade point averages and graduation rates compared with other college students. The finding are especially interesting because there has been a paucity of research focused on how homeschooled students fare in college.

The research, which was conducted by Michael Cogan, the director of institutional research and analysis at the University of St. Thomas, focused on the experiences of homeschooled students at an unnamed medium-sized university in the upper Midwest.

Here are some of Cogan's findings:
Homeschool students earned a higher ACT score (26.5) versus 25.0 for other incoming freshmen.
Homeschool students earned more college credits (14.7) prior to their freshmen year than other students (6.0).
Homeschooled freshmen were less likely to live on campus (72.4%) than the rest of the freshmen class (92.7%).
Homeschoolers were more likely to identify themselves as Roman Catholic (68.4%).
Homeschool freshmen earned a higher grade points average (3.37) their first semester in college compared with the other freshmen (3.08).
Homeschool students finished their freshmen year with a better GPA (3.41) than the rest of their class (3.12).
The GPA advantage was still present when homeschoolers were college seniors. Their average GPA was 3.46 versus 3.16 for other seniors.
Homeschool students graduated from college at a higher rate (66.7%) than their peers (57.5%).
Of course, the big knock on homeschool students is that they never develop social skills since their classrooms are often their kitchen tables and their mothers are often their teachers. Cogan, however, noted that another homeschool study that looked at more than 7,300 adults, who had been homeschooled, determined that the homeschool graduates were more likely to have voted and participated in community service than other adults.

Replies

  • Jilectan
    December 29, 2013 at 3:27 PM

    Personally, I'd say the numbers look good in favor of homeschooling. I'd say that if you're worried about your kids dealing with college, you can start getting them ready during their teens. My kids are years away from this, as the oldest is 9, but I've seen people recommending that teens start taking a college class at a time, online or in person, to start getting used to how things are run at a college. And the whole social skills thing doesn't have to be a big deal. You can get homeschooled kids into activities, park days, take them to the park to play with other kids when they're younger, 4-H, that kind of thing, to get them practicing their social skills.

    Also, just going to public school doesn't ensure they have social skills, either. I certainly didn't develop those until I was out of high school. It took me years to get to the point where I was comfortable talking to someone socially, and I was in public school with a large family. It completely depends on the kids.

  • PurpleCupcake
    December 29, 2013 at 3:40 PM

    That's weird about the Roman Catholic stat. 

  • AutymsMommy
    December 29, 2013 at 3:43 PM

    Not really.

    If you think about it, some of the oldest homeschool programs out there are traditional Catholic; Seton, Our Lady of Victory, and others. Even here in the baptist bible belt, we have 3, rather large, Catholic homeschool co-ops - even though the evangelicals here, in general, outnumber us Catholics greatly.


    Quoting PurpleCupcake:

    That's weird about the Roman Catholic stat. 


  • Jinx-Troublex3
    December 29, 2013 at 3:43 PM

     I hought that as well....

    Quoting PurpleCupcake:

    That's weird about the Roman Catholic stat. 

     

  • PurpleCupcake
    December 29, 2013 at 3:50 PM

    I just didn't expect the number to be so high. 

    Maybe up north there are a lot more Catholics than down south were I live?

    Quoting AutymsMommy:

    Not really.

    If you think about it, some of the oldest homeschool programs out there are traditional Catholic; Seton, Our Lady of Victory, and others. Even here in the baptist bible belt, we have 3, rather large, Catholic homeschool co-ops - even though the evangelicals here, in general, outnumber us Catholics greatly.


    Quoting PurpleCupcake:

    That's weird about the Roman Catholic stat. 



  • AutymsMommy
    December 29, 2013 at 3:54 PM

    I would imagine so.

    I live in the south. There are NOT many Catholics, comparatively - but, percentage wise, I think the PERCENTAGE of Catholics who homeschool is greater than the percentage of "otherwise religiously affilated" homeschoolers.

    Quoting PurpleCupcake:

    I just didn't expect the number to be so high. 

    Maybe up north there are a lot more Catholics than down south were I live?

    Quoting AutymsMommy:

    Not really.

    If you think about it, some of the oldest homeschool programs out there are traditional Catholic; Seton, Our Lady of Victory, and others. Even here in the baptist bible belt, we have 3, rather large, Catholic homeschool co-ops - even though the evangelicals here, in general, outnumber us Catholics greatly.


    Quoting PurpleCupcake:

    That's weird about the Roman Catholic stat. 




  • kirbymom
    December 29, 2013 at 3:55 PM
    I totally agree with you about being in public school is NO guarantee that a child will be socialized. Like you, I went to PS and didn't handle being social publicly at all. In fact, it took being married to my hubby to help me learn how to navigate social situations of most types. Even having children wasn't that much of an impact as far as social situations go. But, I can now handle myself in public. My children have no problems talking to people. Publicly or privately. They handle themselves quite professionally. And they have never been on any public school their whole lives.

    Okay, I'm done. Sorry. This is a huge red button for me.


    Quoting Jilectan:

    Personally, I'd say the numbers look good in favor of homeschooling. I'd say that if you're worried about your kids dealing with college, you can start getting them ready during their teens. My kids are years away from this, as the oldest is 9, but I've seen people recommending that teens start taking a college class at a time, online or in person, to start getting used to how things are run at a college. And the whole social skills thing doesn't have to be a big deal. You can get homeschooled kids into activities, park days, take them to the park to play with other kids when they're younger, 4-H, that kind of thing, to get them practicing their social skills.

    Also, just going to public school doesn't ensure they have social skills, either. I certainly didn't develop those until I was out of high school. It took me years to get to the point where I was comfortable talking to someone socially, and I was in public school with a large family. It completely depends on the kids.

  • kirbymom
    December 29, 2013 at 4:01 PM
    Yeah, I thought that too. Must be from the personal view of the author?


    Quoting PurpleCupcake:

    That's weird about the Roman Catholic stat. 

  • all2gethernow
    December 29, 2013 at 4:05 PM
    Quite awesome!
  • Jenn8604
    December 29, 2013 at 4:07 PM
    I'm not Roman Catholic and my average GPA for 132 college credits is 3.67. I had none prior to college and I was in the political science club that I helped start. Guess that antisocial aspect didn't fit me.

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