Homeschooling Moms

vintage-misha
Math
November 6, 2013 at 10:29 AM

Is anyone aware of a Math curriculum for a first grader that is computer based? One that is not aligned to the Common Core. We are desperetly seeking something to replace Saxon. :(

Replies

  • Jinx-Troublex3
    November 6, 2013 at 10:31 AM
    1st grade.is really easy to piece together and there are tons of free math sites.

    We like Teaching Textbooks but I believe it doesnt start until 3rd grade.
  • AutymsMommy
    November 6, 2013 at 10:31 AM

    Have you had him test to see if he would fit into Teaching Textbooks grade 3? It's pretty significantly behind other programs at that level, and it isn't unheard of for a 1st grade strong math student to test into it.

    Beyond that, while not computer based, have you looked at Miquon? We're using it with my middle son (he's 4, but advanced - it's a grade 1-4 program). It's a ton of fun. C-rod based and very play oriented.

  • hwblyf
    by hwblyf
    November 6, 2013 at 11:37 AM

    Have you tried Braingenie or IXL?  It's not curriculum so much as it's practice and testing.  Braingenie is free, IXL is not.  There's also Khan Academy.

  • jen2150
    by jen2150
    November 6, 2013 at 1:05 PM
    We use Teaching textbooks and the life of fred. I wouldn't start it before 2nd grade though. Teaching textbooks is a great program if there are any lessons that are too easy then just skip them. We read the life of fred along with math journals. They work great together. One thing I like about TT is that it can be geared for any level. It also has plenty of review but it is done in a fun way so my kids love the review.
  • LostTheSlipper
    November 6, 2013 at 1:30 PM

    You could try Elementary Advantage (look on Amazon.)

  • Chasing3
    November 6, 2013 at 1:31 PM

    While I do despise all things common core, I would not be afraid of curricula that advertises as "common core aligned" simply because everyone is going to start stamping that on the cover of their books because they believe it's a selling point. Especially, with the math programs, I wouldn't worry too much on common core alignment. Essentially, how this effects math is expecting lots of written explanations of how they solved multistep problems - which isn't a bad skill. If you're a homeschooler, you can teach at the pace your child will manage - so you don't have to worry if it's dumbed-down. If you child excells, you can skip ahead as many grade levels as necessary.

    Personally, I would stay away from spiraling math curricula and lean toward mastery-based approach to math facts at the elementary level.

  • vintage-misha
    November 7, 2013 at 7:17 AM

    It's not so easy when you have a 6 year old who is math advanced... but thanks. 

    Quoting Jinx-Troublex3:

    1st grade.is really easy to piece together and there are tons of free math sites.

    We like Teaching Textbooks but I believe it doesnt start until 3rd grade.


  • vintage-misha
    November 7, 2013 at 7:19 AM

    I have no yet looked at TT, I know we want to go that route so I will just look now. 

    I have never heard of Miquon, I will look into them. 

    Quoting AutymsMommy:

    Have you had him test to see if he would fit into Teaching Textbooks grade 3? It's pretty significantly behind other programs at that level, and it isn't unheard of for a 1st grade strong math student to test into it.

    Beyond that, while not computer based, have you looked at Miquon? We're using it with my middle son (he's 4, but advanced - it's a grade 1-4 program). It's a ton of fun. C-rod based and very play oriented.


  • AutymsMommy
    November 7, 2013 at 7:53 AM
    Some of us are anti common core on principle and refuse to use anything associated. She had plenty of non aligned options.


    Quoting Chasing3:

    While I do despise all things common core, I would not be afraid of curricula that advertises as "common core aligned" simply because everyone is going to start stamping that on the cover of their books because they believe it's a selling point. Especially, with the math programs, I wouldn't worry too much on common core alignment. Essentially, how this effects math is expecting lots of written explanations of how they solved multistep problems - which isn't a bad skill. If you're a homeschooler, you can teach at the pace your child will manage - so you don't have to worry if it's dumbed-down. If you child excells, you can skip ahead as many grade levels as necessary.

    Personally, I would stay away from spiraling math curricula and lean toward mastery-based approach to math facts at the elementary level.


  • jen2150
    by jen2150
    November 7, 2013 at 8:19 AM
    We love it. My oldest is gifted. Have you thought about using the life of Fred? Make sure you are using real life examples. Also math is best learned with things you can touch. Math manipulatives are great for this reason. Legos can also be used to teach all kinds of math. I recommend using mote than one thing. Math journals are also a great way to experiment with math. Also I would also work on math history as well. There are some amazing books out there.


    Quoting vintage-misha:

    I have no yet looked at TT, I know we want to go that route so I will just look now. 

    I have never heard of Miquon, I will look into them. 

    Quoting AutymsMommy:

    Have you had him test to see if he would fit into Teaching Textbooks grade 3? It's pretty significantly behind other programs at that level, and it isn't unheard of for a 1st grade strong math student to test into it.

    Beyond that, while not computer based, have you looked at Miquon? We're using it with my middle son (he's 4, but advanced - it's a grade 1-4 program). It's a ton of fun. C-rod based and very play oriented.



Homeschooling Moms

Active Posts in All Groups
More Active Posts
Featured Posts in All Groups
More Featured Posts