Homeschooling Moms

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AutymsMommy
Help me think this through before I present it to our co-op leaders.
October 26, 2013 at 1:10 PM

Hypothetically, you were offered the ability to partially enroll your children in a private school for gifted and/or dyslexic children. You could enroll in any of the following subjects (as many or as few as you want): literature/english, OG tutoring, history, science, mathematics, woodshop/3D art, art, music.

You all know about the wonderful school my daughter attends. He wants to reach out to homeschoolers. The school targets children who are both gifted and dyslexic, or just gifted. Other learning disablities are considered - like ADD/ADHD, but not children who have autism or spectrum disorders solely (that isn't what they have the resources for).

I'm going to reach out to the heads/owners of the Catholic co-ops I belong to. The Headmaster had a less than great encounter when he presented this to a protestant group, who appeared to take offense to that he didn't teach young earth creation and that the history is secular. The school is secular, although the Headmaster is conservative and very inclusive/respectful of all faiths. We've yet to run into any issues as Catholics.

What would entice you to take part in this? I'm going to meet with him again to get a price break down (right now tuition is yearly, and he would need to figure out a price breakdown by class/semester/month for this), and because I see some logistical issues (like running your child out daily for one or two supplemental classes) - but I think those could be resolved.

So if this were offered to you, what are some things you would want to see or know? Questions you would ask at a parent session?

ETA: the "homeschool extension" students would have access to the same interscholastic opportunities, camp outs, hiking trips, field trips, etc that the full time students have access to.

Replies

  • PurpleCupcake
    October 26, 2013 at 9:40 PM

    Just point put all the things that are not like ps. The way you just described things points out that this is not a typical ps. 

  • Christie1952
    October 27, 2013 at 12:27 PM

    Wow, if the price is low enough then I think it is an awesome idea. Our public school offers the same thing here in Oregon.

  • KickButtMama
    October 28, 2013 at 9:34 AM

    That's tough... Maybe present it like you have discovered this great learning opportunity gifed /LD and all the good point about it, get them excited, then (at the last minute) throw in the - oh it's actually associated w/ this private B & M ...lol...sneak it in there after their interest is peaked. 

    And make it plain that this B & M would not be evaluating/looking at/judging/spying on their at home learning in any way.

    Quoting AutymsMommy:

    It really IS pretty awesome. They bring in an actual musician for music - he comes with his awesome husky pup and teaches REAL music. The science teacher is a scientist, not a random guy with a degree in science education. The headmaster and several of his staff are what they teach - gifted dyslexics themselves.

    Sorry. I got off track. It's an amazing school.

    Not for anyone with a dog allergy. They have a pooch in the office and another, very large, fluffy dog (the school mascot) roaming the grounds and attending classes with the kids - he's a breed known for being good therapy.. forget the breed name though...

    but I digress. I have a ton of great things to say to the co-ops... I'm just not sure they want to hear it. Some are militantly anti any brick and mortar school.


    Quoting PurpleCupcake:

    ok wow...that's awesome!

    I would talk about what you just said...parents would love that. 

    Quoting AutymsMommy:


    Actually, there aren't textbooks (but for math). Assignments are tailored to each child. First grading period of the year was spent getting to know each child - their strengths, weaknesses, interests, and skill levels, to make that more do-able.

    Quoting PurpleCupcake:

    The reason I ask is that I was gifted as a child and the public schools I went to could not handle it. They were constantly making modifications, changes, creating new classes, testing, testing, testing...it was extremely frustrating!

    And then whatever they did always had a slow pacing problem...which bored me to tears

    I know being gifted sounds like a gift...but it can be much more of a curse in a public school setting. 

    I guess if it were for my kid....I would want to know what else they do besides working from a textbook....What extras are there?

    Quoting AutymsMommy:

    Well, the focus is both gifted AND learning disabled. A gifted child without a learning disability would function fine in the content subjects, because those are more geared to gifted children without the struggle incurred by dyslexic children in skill subjects (like ELA and mathematics) - the gifted dyslexic children receive support in their assignments for content subjects with their at-school-tutors.

    I'm not sure what makes the instruction so different for gifted children. I know that content is usually taught in a multisensory way, expectations are high for quality of work and quality is emphasized over quantity. My lack of answer to that question is relevant - as homeschoolers we always taught to our child's level and naturally differntiated the content for our 2E child/ren, so - not having had a child in an average brick and mortar classroom for so many years, that's a great question for someone to ask the Headmaster, lol. I'll put it on my list!


    Quoting PurpleCupcake:

    Since the focus is gifted children I would want to know what would be so different from teaching average children. 

    Teaching gifted children is very different than average children. 










  • AutymsMommy
    October 28, 2013 at 9:56 AM


    Oh, he definitely wouldn't be spying on their home education. If they asked, he would probably help them put together a more focused plan, just because he does offer that to families outside of his students - children in homeschool, other private schools, or public schools who need help interpreting an IEP or just putting together a game plan for their Learning Abled child.

    I have the feeling price is going to be a huge factor. He would need to keep it less than the cheapest local private schools (and the Catholic schools are only 5K a year here), which is very difficult considering the actual tuition for full time students here (around 20K a year), and the special services the school offers - like one on one tutoring more than once daily, across the board in all subjects... which may be why he seems to only want to offer the content subjects like social studies, science, and "extras" (i.e. woodshop, art, etc) - it would keep the cost down moderately for families.

    Quoting KickButtMama:

    That's tough... Maybe present it like you have discovered this great learning opportunity gifed /LD and all the good point about it, get them excited, then (at the last minute) throw in the - oh it's actually associated w/ this private B & M ...lol...sneak it in there after their interest is peaked. 

    And make it plain that this B & M would not be evaluating/looking at/judging/spying on their at home learning in any way.

    Quoting AutymsMommy:

    It really IS pretty awesome. They bring in an actual musician for music - he comes with his awesome husky pup and teaches REAL music. The science teacher is a scientist, not a random guy with a degree in science education. The headmaster and several of his staff are what they teach - gifted dyslexics themselves.

    Sorry. I got off track. It's an amazing school.

    Not for anyone with a dog allergy. They have a pooch in the office and another, very large, fluffy dog (the school mascot) roaming the grounds and attending classes with the kids - he's a breed known for being good therapy.. forget the breed name though...

    but I digress. I have a ton of great things to say to the co-ops... I'm just not sure they want to hear it. Some are militantly anti any brick and mortar school.


    Quoting PurpleCupcake:

    ok wow...that's awesome!

    I would talk about what you just said...parents would love that. 

    Quoting AutymsMommy:


    Actually, there aren't textbooks (but for math). Assignments are tailored to each child. First grading period of the year was spent getting to know each child - their strengths, weaknesses, interests, and skill levels, to make that more do-able.

    Quoting PurpleCupcake:

    The reason I ask is that I was gifted as a child and the public schools I went to could not handle it. They were constantly making modifications, changes, creating new classes, testing, testing, testing...it was extremely frustrating!

    And then whatever they did always had a slow pacing problem...which bored me to tears

    I know being gifted sounds like a gift...but it can be much more of a curse in a public school setting. 

    I guess if it were for my kid....I would want to know what else they do besides working from a textbook....What extras are there?

    Quoting AutymsMommy:

    Well, the focus is both gifted AND learning disabled. A gifted child without a learning disability would function fine in the content subjects, because those are more geared to gifted children without the struggle incurred by dyslexic children in skill subjects (like ELA and mathematics) - the gifted dyslexic children receive support in their assignments for content subjects with their at-school-tutors.

    I'm not sure what makes the instruction so different for gifted children. I know that content is usually taught in a multisensory way, expectations are high for quality of work and quality is emphasized over quantity. My lack of answer to that question is relevant - as homeschoolers we always taught to our child's level and naturally differntiated the content for our 2E child/ren, so - not having had a child in an average brick and mortar classroom for so many years, that's a great question for someone to ask the Headmaster, lol. I'll put it on my list!


    Quoting PurpleCupcake:

    Since the focus is gifted children I would want to know what would be so different from teaching average children. 

    Teaching gifted children is very different than average children. 












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