Homeschooling Moms

mem82
Well, I suppose this is a good problem to have, right?
by mem82
October 3, 2013 at 10:51 AM
We started in July and Missie informed me today that she will be finished with her Science curriculum before Thanksgiving. Um, that was fast. It's not super easy. It's a 7th grade Science textbook. She has to read a section, answer 2 or 3 pages in a workbook and do a quiz, daily. At the endof each chapter there is a virtual lab and test. She is also busting through her Math. I'm not sure what to do. At the rate she is going my 12yo, 7th grader will be ready for 8th grade Science and high school Algebra by Christmas. I don't know what I should do. Keep moving her up or should I attempt to do a few expansion projects to finish the year? Other suggestions?
Oh, her grades in both hover in the low to mid nineties.

Replies

  • JasonsMom2007
    October 3, 2013 at 10:52 AM
    I would make sure she knows the material then let her move on.
  • mem82
    by mem82
    October 3, 2013 at 10:55 AM
    She knows it. Like me, once the information is read, it is retained.

    Quoting JasonsMom2007:

    I would make sure she knows the material then let her move on.
  • KLove_Mom
    October 3, 2013 at 11:14 AM

    I like your idea of an expansion project. Especially since the timing works that it's over the holidays.

    7th grade is a great time to start working on the proper way to do reasearch projects. I remember hating making notecards and outlines, but it sure helped prepare me for college. 
    She could pick a person, career field, industry or invention to research. 

    Or if you don't want it to be a big research project, maybe just some book reports on non-fiction science items from the library.

    You could also look into a science fair to enter a project into in the spring. If she likes Math and Science this much that would be a great outlet for her.

    Then, that gives you until February to decide what curriculum to use next.  

  • oredeb
    by oredeb
    October 3, 2013 at 11:17 AM

     my 3rd daughter was like that, so i let her go ahead to next level!!! and its a good problem!hahahahahaha

  • KrissyKC
    October 3, 2013 at 11:19 AM

    What about taking some time off of her official "curriculum" after each time she finishes something and make a plan for some fun warm ups, reviews, and special projects.

    Example:   For math, she could do some logic problems, learn some mental math tricks, and do some online math games.   You could always do a stewardship math or consumer math with her a bit.   Or, just give her a months rest of math, then go back and see if she's retaining it after a month off.  This would tell you if she is retaining the info long haul.

    Example:  For science, have her set up her own science projects and find a room (basement?) that she can commondeer for a while.   She can set up several projects and then have some family/friends over for an exhibition night.   Have her do some food-based experiments, too, and she can let people sample her work.   Have her write up a short report on each experiment she did.




  • mem82
    by mem82
    October 3, 2013 at 11:22 AM
    Well, I know she would reject the idea of a break. Summer break annoyed her. Lol I might aim for a few projects.

    Quoting KrissyKC:

    What about taking some time off of her official "curriculum" after each time she finishes something and make a plan for some fun warm ups, reviews, and special projects.

    Example:   For math, she could do some logic problems, learn some mental math tricks, and do some online math games.   You could always do a stewardship math or consumer math with her a bit.   Or, just give her a months rest of math, then go back and see if she's retaining it after a month off.  This would tell you if she is retaining the info long haul.

    Example:  For science, have her set up her own science projects and find a room (basement?) that she can commondeer for a while.   She can set up several projects and then have some family/friends over for an exhibition night.   Have her do some food-based experiments, too, and she can let people sample her work.   Have her write up a short report on each experiment she did.




  • KrissyKC
    October 3, 2013 at 11:24 AM

    She doesn't have to take a break from all her subjects... just a break from the ones she's completing so quickly.   Does she need work in any area (english? writing?) if so, maybe she can take a short writing course.   There are some online.   Or, if she wants to change things up, maybe you can find a retired teacher to give her a writing course.

    Quoting mem82:

    Well, I know she would reject the idea of a break. Summer break annoyed her. Lol I might aim for a few projects.

    Quoting KrissyKC:

    What about taking some time off of her official "curriculum" after each time she finishes something and make a plan for some fun warm ups, reviews, and special projects.

    Example:   For math, she could do some logic problems, learn some mental math tricks, and do some online math games.   You could always do a stewardship math or consumer math with her a bit.   Or, just give her a months rest of math, then go back and see if she's retaining it after a month off.  This would tell you if she is retaining the info long haul.

    Example:  For science, have her set up her own science projects and find a room (basement?) that she can commondeer for a while.   She can set up several projects and then have some family/friends over for an exhibition night.   Have her do some food-based experiments, too, and she can let people sample her work.   Have her write up a short report on each experiment she did.






  • mem82
    by mem82
    October 3, 2013 at 11:30 AM
    She does writing and English, typing, and History. She likes doing all of the subjects. Lol I think I will have her do some sort of project or set of reports while reviewing my options.

    Quoting KrissyKC:

    She doesn't have to take a break from all her subjects... just a break from the ones she's completing so quickly.   Does she need work in any area (english? writing?) if so, maybe she can take a short writing course.   There are some online.   Or, if she wants to change things up, maybe you can find a retired teacher to give her a writing course.


    Quoting mem82:

    Well, I know she would reject the idea of a break. Summer break annoyed her. Lol I might aim for a few projects.



    Quoting KrissyKC:

    What about taking some time off of her official "curriculum" after each time she finishes something and make a plan for some fun warm ups, reviews, and special projects.

    Example:   For math, she could do some logic problems, learn some mental math tricks, and do some online math games.   You could always do a stewardship math or consumer math with her a bit.   Or, just give her a months rest of math, then go back and see if she's retaining it after a month off.  This would tell you if she is retaining the info long haul.

    Example:  For science, have her set up her own science projects and find a room (basement?) that she can commondeer for a while.   She can set up several projects and then have some family/friends over for an exhibition night.   Have her do some food-based experiments, too, and she can let people sample her work.   Have her write up a short report on each experiment she did.







  • usmom3
    by usmom3
    BJ
    October 3, 2013 at 1:04 PM

     I guess that all depends on if you want to move her up or not! I think ether option could be good depending on what you want for your out come!

  • kirbymom
    October 3, 2013 at 7:53 PM
    My oldest is the same way! She was actually done with school at 14but we didn't feel she was ready to be done with school yet so she expanded her research skills and went to writers college.
    She did graduate at 16 though.
    I would let her keep going. Especially if it is what she wants to do.

    Quoting mem82:

    She knows it. Like me, once the information is read, it is retained.

    Quoting JasonsMom2007:I would make sure she knows the material then let her move on.


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