Homeschooling Moms

jakana2369
Dyslexic HELP
October 1, 2013 at 10:22 PM

My Youngest just turned 9yrs. She is a very happy loves life and learning everything. However she is severally dyslexic. I need new ideas to help her coop with this. 4th grade has gotton the best of her so far. Where reading comes. She understands everything just cant read it. What has anyone used to help with this? Or any tricks to help a child with reading.

Replies

  • Bleacheddecay
    October 1, 2013 at 10:44 PM

    It might help to ask around in your community about what help there is. There is help out there. You have to find it.

    Also looking up general help on sites like this might help you work with her.

    http://www.webmd.com/parenting/helping-children-with-dyslexia

    How to Help Children with Dyslexia

    There is no cure for dyslexia. But early intervention can give children with dyslexia the encouragement and tools they need to manage in school and compensate for their disability. If you suspect that your child has dyslexia or another learning disability, talk with your pediatrician as soon as possible. Your doctor can rule out any physical issues -- such as vision problems -- in your child. They may then refer you to a learning specialist, educational psychologist, or speech therapist. The first step will be to have your child evaluated so you can take the appropriate steps at school and at home.

    Most children with dyslexia can learn to read, and many can remain in a regular classroom, but they will need help to do so. Usually, learning specialists use a variety of techniques to work with children with dyslexia on an ongoing basis. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, children with dyslexia are allowed special accommodations in the classroom, such as additional time for tests and other types of support.

    As parents, there are many things you can do to help a child with dyslexia:

    • Educate yourself. Learn all you can about dyslexia treatments, and keep up with the latest research. Seek out other parents of children with dyslexia. They may be an excellent source of information and support.

    • Make sure your child is getting the help he or she needs. See that your child is evaluated and that he or she is getting the right sort of intervention and accommodations at school. Check in regularly with your child's teacher and learning specialists. Don't hesitate to intervene if your child doesn't seem to be thriving, or seems particularly frustrated or discouraged.

    • Read to your child often. Encourage him or her to read to the best of his or her ability.

    • Provide homework support. Make sure your child has a quiet place to study, and that he or she has plenty of time to complete homework. Try to be patient and to create a relaxed, stress-free environment at homework time. Look into tutoring. You may get help through free or low-cost community agencies. If you can afford it, private tutoring is also an option.

    • Encourage your child to pursue activities he or she enjoys. Art, theater, sports, and other non-academic activities all provide positive outlets for children with dyslexia as well as the opportunity to excel.

    • Give your child lots of positive feedback and encouragement. No matter how well the teacher and school work with your child, he or she may face daily reminders about being different from the other children in his or her class. Do what you can to identify and praise strengths and accomplishments.

    • Get help if your child shows signs of emotional distress. Every child has occasional low points, but if your child seems particularly angry, troubled, or depressed, get professional help. Your pediatrician can refer you to a counselor or therapist.
  • AutymsMommy
    October 2, 2013 at 7:15 AM

    Have you had her evaluated by an educational psychologist? This is where you would find out her strengths, weaknesses, and how to best teach her (because even dyslexics learn differently; one dyslexic may have strong auditory skills - another strong visual skills, etc).

    Apples and Pears for spelling and their sister reading program, Dancing Bears.

  • PurpleCupcake
    October 2, 2013 at 8:49 AM

    You can try some of these products (you can also find them cheaper in Amazon.) You can easily find colored pages and reading strips.

    http://irlen.com/index.php

    At the top right corner you can change the color of the page to see if it helps your reader. 

  • KrissyKC
    October 2, 2013 at 10:00 AM

    I don't know much, but I know it's important to get help or to at least seek out information yourself in order to be equipped to help them learn.

    I can't seem to be able to cut and paste, nor can I add a link for whatever reason.

    However, I just searched homeschooling dyslexia and found a website by a mom (Marianne Sunderland) who's dyslexic kids grew up successful.  One even wrote a book.   

    search mariannesunderland dyslexia

    She has multiple pages and topics that she's blogged about to help with dyslexia and home educating kids with it.


  • jakana2369
    October 2, 2013 at 11:52 AM

    I have and we have ALOT of books and games. She is just bord with it. SO I was looking for what others have used and worked for them. I know everything about this. I read all about it. Thanks for the info.



    Quoting Bleacheddecay:

    It might help to ask around in your community about what help there is. There is help out there. You have to find it.

    Also looking up general help on sites like this might help you work with her.

    http://www.webmd.com/parenting/helping-children-with-dyslexia

    How to Help Children with Dyslexia

    There is no cure for dyslexia. But early intervention can give children with dyslexia the encouragement and tools they need to manage in school and compensate for their disability. If you suspect that your child has dyslexia or another learning disability, talk with your pediatrician as soon as possible. Your doctor can rule out any physical issues -- such as vision problems -- in your child. They may then refer you to a learning specialist, educational psychologist, or speech therapist. The first step will be to have your child evaluated so you can take the appropriate steps at school and at home.

    Most children with dyslexia can learn to read, and many can remain in a regular classroom, but they will need help to do so. Usually, learning specialists use a variety of techniques to work with children with dyslexia on an ongoing basis. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, children with dyslexia are allowed special accommodations in the classroom, such as additional time for tests and other types of support.

    As parents, there are many things you can do to help a child with dyslexia:

    • Educate yourself. Learn all you can about dyslexia treatments, and keep up with the latest research. Seek out other parents of children with dyslexia. They may be an excellent source of information and support.

    • Make sure your child is getting the help he or she needs. See that your child is evaluated and that he or she is getting the right sort of intervention and accommodations at school. Check in regularly with your child's teacher and learning specialists. Don't hesitate to intervene if your child doesn't seem to be thriving, or seems particularly frustrated or discouraged.

    • Read to your child often. Encourage him or her to read to the best of his or her ability.

    • Provide homework support. Make sure your child has a quiet place to study, and that he or she has plenty of time to complete homework. Try to be patient and to create a relaxed, stress-free environment at homework time. Look into tutoring. You may get help through free or low-cost community agencies. If you can afford it, private tutoring is also an option.

    • Encourage your child to pursue activities he or she enjoys. Art, theater, sports, and other non-academic activities all provide positive outlets for children with dyslexia as well as the opportunity to excel.

    • Give your child lots of positive feedback and encouragement. No matter how well the teacher and school work with your child, he or she may face daily reminders about being different from the other children in his or her class. Do what you can to identify and praise strengths and accomplishments.

    • Get help if your child shows signs of emotional distress. Every child has occasional low points, but if your child seems particularly angry, troubled, or depressed, get professional help. Your pediatrician can refer you to a counselor or therapist.



  • jakana2369
    October 2, 2013 at 11:56 AM

    She has been tested. She is Gifted and Talented. She gets the 2ed part of reading. She does 6th grade math. We are at a loss. I am going to look up the books apple and pears. Thanks.

  • jakana2369
    October 2, 2013 at 12:22 PM

    Great I will look into it. Thanks.


    Quoting KrissyKC:

    I don't know much, but I know it's important to get help or to at least seek out information yourself in order to be equipped to help them learn.

    I can't seem to be able to cut and paste, nor can I add a link for whatever reason.

    However, I just searched homeschooling dyslexia and found a website by a mom (Marianne Sunderland) who's dyslexic kids grew up successful.  One even wrote a book.   

    search mariannesunderland dyslexia

    She has multiple pages and topics that she's blogged about to help with dyslexia and home educating kids with it.




  • AutymsMommy
    October 2, 2013 at 1:01 PM


    I do not mean tested by a school. Has she seen an educational psychologist, at a private office, to test for learning disabilities?

    Quoting jakana2369:

    She has been tested. She is Gifted and Talented. She gets the 2ed part of reading. She does 6th grade math. We are at a loss. I am going to look up the books apple and pears. Thanks.



  • jakana2369
    October 2, 2013 at 11:07 PM

    Sorry for the confusion. Yes she has been to non school tested. They are the one who marked her GT. She has a very high IQ. That doc is the one who gave me the books and games that we have now.



    Quoting AutymsMommy:


    I do not mean tested by a school. Has she seen an educational psychologist, at a private office, to test for learning disabilities?

    Quoting jakana2369:

    She has been tested. She is Gifted and Talented. She gets the 2ed part of reading. She does 6th grade math. We are at a loss. I am going to look up the books apple and pears. Thanks.





  • AutymsMommy
    October 2, 2013 at 11:37 PM
    Did they say how her dyslexia presents?


    Quoting jakana2369:

    Sorry for the confusion. Yes she has been to non school tested. They are the one who marked her GT. She has a very high IQ. That doc is the one who gave me the books and games that we have now.




    Quoting AutymsMommy:


    I do not mean tested by a school. Has she seen an educational psychologist, at a private office, to test for learning disabilities?


    Quoting jakana2369:

    She has been tested. She is Gifted and Talented. She gets the 2ed part of reading. She does 6th grade math. We are at a loss. I am going to look up the books apple and pears. Thanks.








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