Homeschooling Moms

Featured Posts
Jlee4249
Why skim over info just to get done "by lunch"? (PIOG)
September 14, 2013 at 1:55 AM

....That's how I feel about folks who miraculously get done "by lunch".

I'm sure I just offended someone, but let me explain.  

((My kids are 7 & 5.  My 5yo has been reading since he was 4 and participates in the science and Language arts with his sister.  He does his own math when she does hers, but usually sits out on History b/c he doesn't have the attention yet.))

Someone said that we must be taking too long on the subjects and that they manage 7 to 8 subjects in a day and are still done by early afternoon, if not lunch, when they started at 7 or 8.   That, to me, seems like skimming the information... "Here, honey, read that paragraph on amphibians, answer those four questions and you're done with science for the day."    <-- That's where my mind goes when someone tells me they can get through that many subjects in such a short period of time.  

I am quite certain that I'm spending too much time on subjects, but how can I not?  What I mean is that if I'm teaching my child at home, something that oftentimes gets a lot of criticism, I feel obligated to make sure my kid is actually learning this stuff and not just skimming by.

************************************

Here's our schedule, odd by most standards, but I would never be able to fit it all in otherwise:

EVERY DAY starts the same (M-F) Math, Language Arts (nouns, parts of a sentence, etc), and reading a chapter from a novel out loud.  Then each day has a "big" subject (which just means it take a while)

Monday: 
History: We're working our way through American History.  We're on westward expansion and are currently reading the Laura Ingalls Wilder books (this is the chapter read outloud every day).  We've recently finished a book on the Erie Canal and two books on the Pony Express.  We have another on steamboats and railroads waiting... to make way for the transcontinental railroad, after the Civil war... a couple of books at a time and events added to the timeline.  (President study each time we hit a new one.  We're at Andrew Jackson.)

Tuesday:
Science: right now, we are adding peices of their body to their life-size outline on the wall (paper taped to the wall).  We only have the brain and the ears (internal, too).  Tomorrow we're doing the eyes, from the cornea to the brain.  Leaving this to last the rest of 2013, I'd suspect.  (Respiratory system, digestive system, muscles, bones, reproductive, etc.)  We also throw in a scientist or two, and add them to the timeline book.  

Wednesday:
Geography: Each month, we split studies between one country and one state and make a scrapbook-type page with all the flips and fold-outs of the interesting facts.  That goes in her "world book".  She loves it and retains all the info that way.

Thursday has the same start-up, but the rest is filled with library, errands, and catch-up for anything we didn't finish the day(s) before.

Fridays:  same start-up as the rest Then, Creative writing.  This is story, plot, characters, etc.  Journal entries and rough drafts, poetry, whatever.   **(This is our end-early day)**

Saturdays and Sundays are ONLY music and art in the mornings after breakfast, b/c their dad likes to do those with them.  

*********************************

Many folks may tell me I'm going too in-depth for such a young kid.  But my 7yo is a sponge.  She wants to know more and why and how....  


I am SOOOOOO open for tips and advice.  I am willing (and eager) to do things differently.  

Funny enough, it's the science "projects" the geography "projects" and the numerous History books and stories that take up all our time...  And I truly can't imagine Not being that in-depth, ya know?

ok.  your turn:  Your schedules.  Your advice.  Ready?  Go!


Replies

  • unsuspected
    September 14, 2013 at 2:04 AM
    What you're doing sounds great and its obviously working for your kids. I'm new to homeschooling, so we are just figuring out what will work for us.
  • ilostmy_keys
    September 14, 2013 at 2:10 AM
    I could only dream of being that organized. I am trying to hs with a 9m old, and 6y, 4y and 3y olds. It's a nightmare and we are considering PS again. Keep it up, sounds like you're doing great.
  • vintage-misha
    September 14, 2013 at 2:37 AM

    We follow the Charlotte Mason Method however, with History we follow the classical schedule. I can teach everything in detail and with a project and be finished by lunch. Charlotte Mason recommends that children spend the time after lunch outside in nature and exploring it. We do that. We don't ever 'skim' through a subject and our curriculum is fantastically detailed. We can do all subjects and not only finish by lunch but we also only have a 4 day school week since we are year rounders. 

  • Jlee4249
    September 14, 2013 at 2:54 AM
    Quoting vintage-misha:

    We follow the Charlotte Mason Method however, with History we follow the classical schedule. I can teach everything in detail and with a project and be finished by lunch. Charlotte Mason recommends that children spend the time after lunch outside in nature and exploring it. We do that. We don't ever 'skim' through a subject and our curriculum is fantastically detailed. We can do all subjects and not only finish by lunch but we also only have a 4 day school week since we are year rounders. 



    tell me how does CM handle history & science. Is it novels/story books pertaining to something like a curriculum or is it anything goes? do you follow a timeline? I so LOVE the idea of Charlotte Mason method, I just don't know enough about it to even attempt it. From the little I've read or heard, it sounds perfect, but I wouldn't even know where to begin. Do you make your own curriculum with Charlotte Mason? "Living books" are a part of CM, aren't they? I believe that is where I got the idea of using all the historical books we do...
    But in order to hit every topic each day and get done by lunch, how in-depth do you go, or do you just span it over a week's time?
    We schoolyear around, too, taking one month and then random days off throughout.
  • vintage-misha
    September 14, 2013 at 3:26 AM

    Our History curriculum is set up into 10 units and each unit takes 4 weeks to teach. They have the lesson and information printed along with a list of living books that we read, activities to complete and timeline. Our History also does notebooking, memory work, and copywork. Therefore I don't have to set extra time aside for handwriting, because he does it through out the lesson. Although my son is only in 1st grade and we are beginning cursive next month, that may change. We just use a ton of living books to give him excellent knowledge.

    Have you looked at Ambleside? They provide a list of what subjects to teach each term/year. 2013/2014 is Summer/Fall: Trees/shrubs/vines. Winter: Stars/Sky. Spring: Amphibians. That's the general topic and we choose how in depth we go. Again we use living whole books and really delve into the subjects. We are also doing a study on composers.

    http://www.amazon.com/Charlotte-Mason-Companion-Personal-Reflections/dp/1889209023/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1379143110&sr=8-1&keywords=charlotte+mason+method+companion This is an excellent introduction and helpmate to CM Method.

    This is an amazing book to help you find whole living books of superb quality. http://www.amazon.com/Read-Heart-Whole-WholeHearted-Families/dp/1932012974/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1379143161&sr=8-1&keywords=reading+for+the+heart

    As far as time spent, we do very in depth. Our longest subject time is reading because my son does not enjoy it. We start at 8 or 9, depending on the morning. Math takes us maybe 45 minutes. History is about an hour or an hour and a half. Science depends, we do most of our science in the 'real world' and my son is taking environmental science with our co-op and I am teaching DInosaurs at the co-op and he is also taking that class. So he's getting 2 hours of science in one day at co-op. Handwriting, memory work, narration, and such are covered under History. We wrap up school at 12:30 and spent 2 hours outside after lunch, walking the dog and talking about nature. This leads to trips to the library for living books on what we have discovered while outside. Since we are heavily CM we don't watch t.v. much so more often than not we are nose deep in a book and learning.


    I hope this was helpful!!

    Quoting Jlee4249:

    Quoting vintage-misha:

    We follow the Charlotte Mason Method however, with History we follow the classical schedule. I can teach everything in detail and with a project and be finished by lunch. Charlotte Mason recommends that children spend the time after lunch outside in nature and exploring it. We do that. We don't ever 'skim' through a subject and our curriculum is fantastically detailed. We can do all subjects and not only finish by lunch but we also only have a 4 day school week since we are year rounders. 



    tell me how does CM handle history & science. Is it novels/story books pertaining to something like a curriculum or is it anything goes? do you follow a timeline? I so LOVE the idea of Charlotte Mason method, I just don't know enough about it to even attempt it. From the little I've read or heard, it sounds perfect, but I wouldn't even know where to begin. Do you make your own curriculum with Charlotte Mason? "Living books" are a part of CM, aren't they? I believe that is where I got the idea of using all the historical books we do...
    But in order to hit every topic each day and get done by lunch, how in-depth do you go, or do you just span it over a week's time?
    We schoolyear around, too, taking one month and then random days off throughout.
  • NYCitymomx3
    September 14, 2013 at 8:45 AM

    From 2nd to 6th grades we were done with daily academics in less than 2 hours (by lunchtime).  We used Ambleside Online (a Charlotte Mason curriculum) and then went more eclectic.  Ds is in 7th grade now and we still keep our academics fairly short .  We usually start at around 11 or 12 and we're done in 2.5-3 hours (if we started at 9am, we'd be done by noon). 

    4 days a week, ds does 45 minutes of math, 45 minutes of literature and watches a 10-minute daily online news program and we discuss that.  Then 2 days a week he also does 30-minutes of history along with 30-minutes of geography.  The other 2 days a week we spend about 45-minutes on science.  He wants to learn a language, so we'll add that in 2x a week, maybe 15 minutes a pop.  We keep one day free for field trips.

    He is doing a rigorous curriculum (Saxon Math Algebra 1/2, Lightning Lit 7, Apologia Science, etc) and I make sure ds understands everything we cover.  We certainly don't just skim over.  My kids have always done better with lots of free time to pursue their own interests.  Academics all day long burns them (and me) out quickly and they hardly retain anything.  For us, quality is way more effective than quantity.  And the weekly field trip is a perfect way to balance out our week. 

  • Jlee4249
    September 14, 2013 at 10:11 AM

    BUMP!

  • Chasing3
    September 14, 2013 at 10:54 AM

    ok -- i've only been doing this for 11 days, but so far, I've found a few days we were done by lunch. Other days we worked a lot longer. If we are done that early, I have on our planner what is called "project." This spot has been filled in a few times, once with tearing down a section of broken fence, moving a pile of old wood, and pulling up some invasive vines in the yard, once with purchashing supplies for and setting up an aquarium, and once with putting Mentos into Diet Coke bottles (we need the bottles for a science project). It's not as if he can play viedo games all day if we're done early!

    For example, Friday (yesterday) he did a math chapter pre-test, which is only 3 pages he has to do independently. He finished in 15 minutes. So math was done! I had him do some math drills on-line for a total of 30 min of math. He read a ton of social studies and did a short writing assignment on it for about an hour. Science was preparing for a hands-on project we're doing next week, so not really a sit-and-write learning task, maybe took him 30 minutes. Then, he spend about an hour on a technology assignment (he made a video of an interview with a character from a book he read). I suppose little of this looks like "school" to most folks, and he was done by noon. So, I let him watch 4 videos he took out of the library on ancient civilizations after lunch which was about another 2 hours. So, yeah, he got to sit and watch tv for 2 hours (commence the criticism!!). And that did lead him to look up info on Ancient Greece for a bit on the computer.

    It was an easy day. Somedays, not so easy.

    I might add, I also consider independent reading after dinner/before bed part of his school hours.

  • TJandKarasMom
    September 14, 2013 at 10:59 AM

    We get through a lot, but we are done usually right after lunch.  We seem to do school M-Th from about 8:30-1ish, and F we are usually done at 12.  If we want to go deeper in something, we do.  But I also want them to have afternoons to do what they want and explore...be outside, or research something they are interested in, or just relax, play games, whatever. 

    So what time are you done each day?  I like the idea of your schedule, but I'm not sure my kids would like a whole day devoted to one subject (especially on the day that it's a subject they don't like much).  It works well for us to hit most topics each day (history and science 2x a week, art and music once a week), we don't cover a ton in the day, but I'm sure we cover similar to what you do over a week.  (But our topics are different and my kids are older).

    I honestly don't see how people can expect their kids to do school from 9-5.  We chose to homeschool so we could have the flexibility we wanted, we can teach what we want, and we can take a day off if we want.  I expect my kids to finish their work each day, but if I notice something is taking much longer than it should, then we drop it and I break it down or save it for later.

    I don't think you can really judge people that finish before lunch, they are most likely covering in one week what you cover in one day-only you only do one subject each day...so maybe my history lessons are only 2 hrs 2x a week, but that's as much as your 4 hrs one day a week, kwim?

  • MacMamaof5
    September 14, 2013 at 11:35 AM

    MOST days we are finished by lunch.  My kids are 2,4,6, and 8.  If I don't keep it short and sweet--I lose them.  So we don't skim anything.  But I do keep my lessons to the point which makes us probably a little slower than ps. (I don't mind that--DS came home with tons of homework the teacher never even got to at least "skim" and expected me to teach it at home anyway).  But after lunch is for exploring and imaginative play and mommie getting on the floor to really get to know mykids.  For us, the goal is relationship getting close with God and each other and people loving.

Homeschooling Moms

Active Posts in All Groups
More Active Posts
Featured Posts in All Groups
More Featured Posts