Homeschooling Moms

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monie03
k12 and homeschooling
by monie03
September 7, 2013 at 2:49 PM

 I hate this Georgia law my daughter is one day of the cut off date and I been homeschooling her my other 2 are now in k-12 cause the teachers or the school I had him in was a good school they didnt have the patient to deal with a special need little more time also   he's extremely smart just a little more engery then your tipical 6 yrs. just has a hardtime staying focus and following direction but working with him throught k-12 is good so far not problems yet lol but back to my 5yrs do you have any resources on where I should start with her or continue to do what I'm doing like now we working to improve her writing skills and she read her first little story to me now we also working on site words and writing her numbers to 1 to 50 for now if you have anymore ideas I can used them pls also extra help for my son working on following direction skills and focus skills thank you for your inputs or opinions

Replies

  • romacox
    by romacox
    September 7, 2013 at 3:34 PM

    Total Physical Response (physically involving the children in the learning process) has been around for over 30 years.  With this method we know that children learn faster, retain more, drop out rates decrease by 90%,  and stress is reduced.  With the new brain research, we now understand that it even improves the health of the brain, but it is particularly good for active hands on learners.  Brain Based Approach To Teaching And Learning. 

  • Chasing3
    September 7, 2013 at 8:44 PM

    starfall.com is a really good website for pre-kindergarten/kindergarten level learning phonics and begining reading. Get lots of books from the library and just read aloud a lot!

    And good for you for getting your son out of public instead of letting the school push you onto the adhd bandwagon! I'm sure your patience and understanding with letting him learn at his own pace and be able to take frequent breaks and doing physical things inbetween lessons will do him a world of good if he's an active type. Consider getting one of those giant exercise balls for him to sit on while he's doing his school work - kids bounce around a little and squirm a lot on them, but the ball makes them work at sitting and burns off some of that extra energy!

  • kirbymom
    September 7, 2013 at 9:31 PM
    Great advice going on above me. I would say that you are off to a great start. Yes, keep doing what you're doing. Get them wholly engaged in the learning process. If they are fully bodily into the lesson they are learning at the moment, they are more likely to remember what it is they are learning. Even if their moving isn't directly related to the direct sentence, the whole body engagement will keep their brain focused and their body will be doing what comes naturally to most youngsters. They are also expending their almost boundless energy levels too. Keep up the good work mom. You're doing great. :)
  • KickButtMama
    September 8, 2013 at 1:03 AM

    I enjoyed using www.letteroftheweek.com when my kids were that age. But don't stress too much, working on reading and writing with some basic math thrown in is really all you need before 1st/2nd grade.

  • maggiemom2000
    September 8, 2013 at 10:42 AM

    Lots of great stuff for 5 yr olds!

    Growing Readers

    Are you Growing a Reader? Homeschooling your early reader? No need to buy an expensive curriculum to get your child off to a great start at reading. Do you want to avoid tedious, boring worksheets and instead learn through engaging hands on activities and play? Here are a collection of links on teaching your child to read and write for free:

    Sight Words or Phonics? How about a balanced approach?


    Read some background on using a balanced literacy approach to teach your child to read. What does your Kindergartner need to learn in reading? See the list of Common Core Kindergarten Standards and links to activities to teach those skills to your emergent reader.

    What do I need to Buy?

    The short answer: nothing. You can do all of the lessons and activities here using books from the library and things you already have around the house like paper, pens, chalk, and index cards. In this post I suggest some possible things you can buy to enhance the activities. These are supplies that you will be able to use for years, not just for a couple of lessons. Manipulatives like a good set of magnetic letters can be used from preschool into elementary school, beginning with basic letter identification, on to phonics, building sight words, word families and complex multisyllabic spelling words.


    Shared Literature

    Read, read, read to your child. Reading aloud to your child is the best thing you can do to grow a reader. Go beyond reading aloud and teach your child reading skills while enjoying great literature! (Preschool, Pre-K, Kindergarten)


    Early Alphabet Learning and the Name Game

    How to begin teaching the alphabet and other early literacy skills to your preschooler or Kindergartner. (Preschool, Pre-K, Kindergarten)

    Kindergarten Sight Words and Early Reading Skills

    What you need to know to get started teaching your Kindergartner to read including a look at some of the Common Core Standards for Kindergarten reading. (Kindergarten)

    Kindergarten Sight Word Sentences

    After you know about teaching sight words to your Kindergartner you are ready to move on to sentences. (Kindergarten)

    Kindergarten Sight Words Reading Books

    Once you start introducing your child to the sight words he is ready for his first emergent-reader book. (Kindergarten)


    Beginning Phonics for Emergent Readers

    Once your child knows most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds he is ready to learn to "sound out" simple CVC words. This post shows you lots of hands on multi-sensory ways to practice early phonics. (Kindergarten, First Grade)


    Learn 37 Words and Know how to Read and Write Over 500 Words!

    Your child can learn more phonics "rules" by learning several words with common letter patterns. When your child learns to make analogies and manipulate onset and rime they can quickly read and write hundreds of new words. These are better known as word families. (Kindergarten, First Grade, Second Grade)
  • lovelylady83
    September 8, 2013 at 7:12 PM
    k12 has a prek program now... not sure if that is something you are interested in... https://ecomm.k12.com/ecommerce/public/courseDetails.xhtml?cid=749723 or you can just use starfall.com, National Greographic little kids... discovery kids online... they are all free! barnes and nobles carries kumon workbooks it just depends on what you are trying to do with her
  • LoriAlane8
    September 10, 2013 at 12:36 AM

    Sounds like you are doing great already. My now 11th grade son (now in K12's California Virtual Academy) sounds a lot like your energetic son. I'm so glad I have homeschooled him all throughout his 15 years. It takes a lot of patience and repeating and repeating instructions etc. but well worth it in the end. I also noticed he got a bit calmer once he went through puberty. Still very energetic but more managable. Keep at it and no public school could do as much as you are. Give him lots of breaks to burn off his extra energy, especially when he seems to not be albe to concentrate. Teach him to do this on his own. My son now goes outside and does his "freerunning/parkour" when he can't concentrate. And, to my chagrin, he listens to music, very energetic music, which he promises helps him concentrate. As long as his grades stay up, I allow it. Somehow I think the upbeat music helps calm his body so his brain can work....go figure. Try doing lessons while he jumps around, or have him run laps right before taking an assessment, etc. Good luck!

  • SusanTheWriter
    September 10, 2013 at 11:14 AM

    My ADD daughter listens to music while she studies, too! As long as she's not singing along, I have no problem with it. Well, that and I make her wear her headphones. There's only so much I can take! *gg* She swore she was doing fine with the singing, too, until I showed her neurological research showing that while both activities could occur simultaneously, neither one of them would be done well. And her grades proved it! Much less random singing now. :)

    Quoting LoriAlane8:

    Sounds like you are doing great already. My now 11th grade son (now in K12's California Virtual Academy) sounds a lot like your energetic son. I'm so glad I have homeschooled him all throughout his 15 years. It takes a lot of patience and repeating and repeating instructions etc. but well worth it in the end. I also noticed he got a bit calmer once he went through puberty. Still very energetic but more managable. Keep at it and no public school could do as much as you are. Give him lots of breaks to burn off his extra energy, especially when he seems to not be albe to concentrate. Teach him to do this on his own. My son now goes outside and does his "freerunning/parkour" when he can't concentrate. And, to my chagrin, he listens to music, very energetic music, which he promises helps him concentrate. As long as his grades stay up, I allow it. Somehow I think the upbeat music helps calm his body so his brain can work....go figure. Try doing lessons while he jumps around, or have him run laps right before taking an assessment, etc. Good luck!


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