Homeschooling Moms

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cstargarner
pre-k help?
July 24, 2013 at 1:05 AM

I know this may not exactly qualify as homeschooling but thought i'd give it a shot.  I had planned on putting my son in some kind of pre-k /mother's day out with a curriculum so he'd be prepared for kindergarten when he's 5 (turns 4 thurs).  Anyway, I had him in a mother's day out program last year and he was given foods he's allergic to over and over again, despite meetings, phone calls.. to the point of being in tears, and nothing helped so now i've just decided to keep him home with me this year.  I'd like any help you all could give me with at least pointing me in the right direction as to what and how to do to teach him without making him dread doing the work, but still preparing him for kinder since he'll be one of the youngest in his class.  I have a kit that came with worksheets you can copy for tracing letters and various worksheets, and was thinking about buying a kit I saw at toys r us that said something like "get ready for kindergarten" and came with different learning tools like the counters, flashcards..   Any ideas?

Replies

  • kirbymom
    July 24, 2013 at 7:31 PM
    Everyone has great ideas on what to do. :)
    You can also get activity books that have dot to dots and color by numbers and tracing/drawing etc., and you can also get some activity books with abc's. Some children love workbooks at this age. It sort of makes them feel like a big kid. We know better but if that is what gets them excited about learning, then go for it. Just try and make sure there is lots is fun and enjoyment. You can do this. Besides, you have been teaching him for a few years already, this is just something else to teach him on the road of life. :)
  • Molimomma
    July 25, 2013 at 8:23 AM

    In Kindergarten he'll need to be able to write his name, cut with scissors, know his letters and numbers 1-20. Eventually he'll need to count to 100. He'll need to know letters sounds and how to sound out words like cat, cup, sat (basic 3 & 4 letter words). He'll learn color words and number words 1-10. Any of this that you start working on now will help him feel more confident when he gets to school. Knowing his letters, their sounds, numbers and counting objects to 10 would be the best place to start. 

  • saraewhite
    July 25, 2013 at 8:26 AM

    I have heard that abcmouse.com is a wonderful sight for children to learn on.

  • Donna.June
    July 25, 2013 at 7:37 PM

    What is The Mailbox? I tried google, but I'm not sure what I'm looking for, lol.

    Quoting hipmomto3:

    See if your public library has a subscription to The Mailbox. I used a lot of their ideas when I taught pre-K. Our public library also has an area of early ed resource books you can check out, and another area where they can't be checked out but they let you make up to 10 copies from those books per day, for free. 

    I'd decide on an approach - unit studies (like dinosaurs this week, apples next week, community helpers next, etc) or letter-of-the-week or whatever you want to do - and plan an activity a day around that. I wouldn't push much by way of academics, maybe 1 worksheet a day. I'm not a fan of worksheets. ;) Go to the library a lot. Work in phonics and early reading activities. Read to him a lot.


  • collinsmommy0
    July 26, 2013 at 6:37 PM
    There's also a lot of paid curriculums that you can have delivered to your house. Adventures in learning is one, but it's pricey!
  • collinsmommy0
    July 26, 2013 at 6:38 PM
    Search for the mailbox magazine - it's a magazine that also sells books. Sign up for their deals - they have stuff on sale all the time. I got 5 pre-k theme kits for $16 one time due to their sales! Their books are under 'products' I think

    Quoting Donna.June:

    What is The Mailbox? I tried google, but I'm not sure what I'm looking for, lol.

    Quoting hipmomto3:

    See if your public library has a subscription to The Mailbox. I used a lot of their ideas when I taught pre-K. Our public library also has an area of early ed resource books you can check out, and another area where they can't be checked out but they let you make up to 10 copies from those books per day, for free. 

    I'd decide on an approach - unit studies (like dinosaurs this week, apples next week, community helpers next, etc) or letter-of-the-week or whatever you want to do - and plan an activity a day around that. I wouldn't push much by way of academics, maybe 1 worksheet a day. I'm not a fan of worksheets. ;) Go to the library a lot. Work in phonics and early reading activities. Read to him a lot.


  • maggiemom2000
    July 26, 2013 at 6:59 PM

    Lots of hands on, playful activities here!

    Growing Readers

    Are you Growing a Reader? Homeschooling your early reader? No need to buy an expensive curriculum to get your child off to a great start at reading. Do you want to avoid tedious, boring worksheets and instead learn through engaging hands on activities and play? Here are a collection of links on teaching your child to read and write for free:

    Sight Words or Phonics? How about a balanced approach?


    Read some background on using a balanced literacy approach to teach your child to read. What does your Kindergartner need to learn in reading? See the list of Common Core Kindergarten Standards and links to activities to teach those skills to your emergent reader.

    What do I need to Buy?

    The short answer: nothing. You can do all of the lessons and activities here using books from the library and things you already have around the house like paper, pens, chalk, and index cards. In this post I suggest some possible things you can buy to enhance the activities. These are supplies that you will be able to use for years, not just for a couple of lessons. Manipulatives like a good set of magnetic letters can be used from preschool into elementary school, beginning with basic letter identification, on to phonics, building sight words, word families and complex multisyllabic spelling words.

    Shared Literature

    Read, read, read to your child. Reading aloud to your child is the best thing you can do to grow a reader. Go beyond reading aloud and teach your child reading skills while enjoying great literature! (Preschool, Pre-K, Kindergarten)

    Early Alphabet Learning and the Name Game

    How to begin teaching the alphabet and other early literacy skills to your preschooler or Kindergartner. (Preschool, Pre-K, Kindergarten)

    Kindergarten Sight Words and Early Reading Skills

    What you need to know to get started teaching your Kindergartner to read including a look at some of the Common Core Standards for Kindergarten reading. (Kindergarten)

    Kindergarten Sight Word Sentences

    After you know about teaching sight words to your Kindergartner you are ready to move on to sentences. (Kindergarten)

    Kindergarten Sight Words Reading Books

    Once you start introducing your child to the sight words he is ready for his first emergent-reader book. (Kindergarten)

    Beginning Phonics for Emergent Readers

    Once your child knows most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds he is ready to learn to "sound out" simple CVC words. This post shows you lots of hands on multi-sensory ways to practice early phonics. (Kindergarten, First Grade)

    Learn 37 Words and Know how to Read and Write Over 500 Words!

    Your child can learn more phonics "rules" by learning several words with common letter patterns. When your child learns to make analogies and manipulate onset and rime they can quickly read and write hundreds of new words. These are better known as word families. (Kindergarten, First Grade, Second Grade)
  • Molimomma
    August 1, 2013 at 9:08 AM


    It's a collection of themed worksheets. I used to teach K /1 and I have quite a few, they come out monthly and usually have a theme that goes with the month like fall, bats, valentine's day, etc.

    Quoting Donna.June:

    What is The Mailbox? I tried google, but I'm not sure what I'm looking for, lol.

    Quoting hipmomto3:

    See if your public library has a subscription to The Mailbox. I used a lot of their ideas when I taught pre-K. Our public library also has an area of early ed resource books you can check out, and another area where they can't be checked out but they let you make up to 10 copies from those books per day, for free. 

    I'd decide on an approach - unit studies (like dinosaurs this week, apples next week, community helpers next, etc) or letter-of-the-week or whatever you want to do - and plan an activity a day around that. I wouldn't push much by way of academics, maybe 1 worksheet a day. I'm not a fan of worksheets. ;) Go to the library a lot. Work in phonics and early reading activities. Read to him a lot.




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