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celticdragon77
Why can't I differentiate between the vowels???
June 15, 2013 at 1:51 AM

Grr!!! I can NOT say and hear vowel sounds every time.

I can not differentiate between "pen" and "pin" - whether hearing or saying it. 

The a in apple and man sound different to me. 

There are times when o, u, e sounded like a to me. - As well as other confusions. 

Seriously, I should not be teaching phonics!! No wonder my kids are so far behind in their reading skills.

My 17yr old was shocked at how bad I was at hearing the vowels differences. She asked me to spell large words - and I did fine. She asked how I could get them right when it is obvious that I can not hear them. I had to think about it, but it is because I know from "background knowledge" how things look together. However, when I do spell words wrong, it is usually due to vowels. When I spell the word: different. I can't tell if e or a should be there. I have had to memorize this information.

Replies

  • romacox
    by romacox
    June 15, 2013 at 8:08 AM


    Mommyfish831, my experience was the same.  I had no idea either.  In discussion groups, I realized others were hearing things that I was not hearing.  So I walked into Walmart's free hearing test center to see what was going on.  That is when I discovered the hearing loss.

    Quoting Mommyfish831:

    That is very interesting.  I have pretty much the same problem as the poster and I have noticed that if people are talking quietly I have to be looking at them to understand them.  I might I have to find someone who can do a hearing test on me.  It sounds silly but I had no idea there were different types,of hearing lose.

    Quoting romacox:

    It sounds like you might have  cookie bite hearing loss.  I have that condition, and with hearing aids, I do just fine teaching phonics.  Also with the hearing aids, I understand conversations much better. I don't have to look at them in the face to understand what they are saying.  I was reading lips, and never realized it.  A cookie bite hearing loss is very hard to detect, because one ears some sounds very well, and not other.  I could not tell the difference between F and S, and did not hear m at all.  

    I did not discover my hearing loss until I was an adult. As a result my teacher gave up teaching me phonics, and taught sight word recognition instead. I was a slow reader, and hated reading. Learning phonics opened a whole new world to me, and made me more sensitive to struggling readers. I now have have an unusually high success rate helping children learn to read, and give workshops at the University Of North Florida on why my method works so well.

    Girl, you just might become a blessing to others because of your experiences.  You might have some trouble learning the different sounds of e and a , and e and i.   But once you learn that difference,   a whole new world might open up for you too. 




  • bluerooffarm
    June 15, 2013 at 8:57 AM

     Did you grow up near Pittsburgh?  Pittsburghese makes the sounds different.

  • Bleacheddecay
    June 15, 2013 at 1:28 PM

    I have an issue with this too. I tried to teach or rather let them learn phonics. One could hear them. One could not.

  • celticdragon77
    June 15, 2013 at 2:53 PM

    No. We are way on the other side of the state. Lancaster county - about an hour and a half from Philadelphia, Pa. and 45mins from Baltimore, Md.

    I am from the south and had a really deep southern accent. I had lived in Arkansas, Texas, and Oklahoma. When I lived in Oklahoma - even other people with southern accents struggled to understand me. They said I had too thick of a southern accent (from my time in Arkansas). Then I moved to Pennsylvania an was immediately put in a speech class to get rid of the accent and relearn proper words (like to say shopping cart instead of buggy - it is especially confusing to say buggy for a shopping cart in Lancaster county when it is a heavily populated Amish community / tourist area). - But anyways, the accent is gone for the most part. I do spend a lot of time in Texas, so there is a slight southern drawl sometimes.

    People I know in Texas say that my kids and their dad have a slight nothern accent - but say I do not. When I ask people up here if I have a southern accent - they say no (except if I say lighter and socks - along with a few other words - then they point out that say those words "funny", not realizing it is the southern accent influencing them). I struggle to even say the word drawer at all. I usually end up saying in frustration "the thing you put your clothes in". It is the r and w sounds together in that word. It was even harder to say as a kid - I have gotten better.

    But I don't know that ANY of this relates to why I can't hear vowel sound differences that well.

    I also do not find myself having to look at people to hear them. I have pretty good hearing.  

    Also, while I can BETTER tell the differences of the short vowel sounds when doing them individually (I struggle a bit to do it). Where I REALLY get stumped is when they are IN a word - blended. So pIn, pEn, an pAn - stump me. I will say pIn an they will say I am saying pEn. I will say pEn and they will say I am saying pAn or pIn. If I say pEn casually - it comes off as pIn. If I TRY to say pEn - it comes off as pAn. I feel ridiculously stupid with this. These are kindergarten words and skills!!!

    Quoting bluerooffarm:

     Did you grow up near Pittsburgh?  Pittsburghese makes the sounds different.


  • lucsch
    by lucsch
    June 15, 2013 at 3:13 PM

    I really had to work on it. Phonics would have  NEVER worked for me, as my accent and all those around me was so warped ALL vowels sounded the same. LOL

    Fortunately, I moved from WV to IN 20 years before I started homeschooling. I've lost that twangy accent. So, yes, vowels actually DO have their own sounds.

    Get a phonics program that has CDs or DVDs with it, so you and your children can hear the sounds. You can retrain yourself. On your homeschooling journey, you will be doing this a lot!

    I second "The ABCs and All their Tricks"---great book.

  • No_Difference
    June 15, 2013 at 3:57 PM

     We've lived in WI, TX, GA, MD, and now WV. It took a lot of effort to make sure my daughter did not pick up a southern drawl while we lived in TX and GA. When we moved to MD it wasn't nearly as bad, and she did great. When we moved to WV, the teachers were telling her she was reading wrong. It took me a few years to realize, it was because she was actually articulating and saying all of her letter sounds as if they each had their own sound instead of slurring and "mushing" the sounds lol. She would come home with a HORRIBLE hill billy drawl where NONE of the letters had a distinct sound. I was SO mad, and it took me forever to get it through her head she is NOT to talk like that LOL. Her 2nd grade year, we had to restart phonics basically. We got All About Spelling and their phonics CD and I had her listen to those as she did her lessons. She would listen to the sound, and then we'd record her on the computer and play it back so she could hear how she was saying it in comparison. After awhile, she realized I was making her actually say the sounds correctly, and now she corrects me on certain words, for instance, where I grew up in WI, we said "ANT" for Aunt. She now gets mad at me, "No Mom. There is a u there that is influencing the A it is the /aw/ sound" lol.

    We did a fun little side project on accents after she started correcting me lol. Here's a few of the intersting sites:
    http://www.pbs.org/speak/seatosea/americanvarieties/map/map.html
    http://www4.uwm.edu/FLL/linguistics/dialect/maps.html

    I don't think I helped much, sorry.  

    Quoting celticdragon77:

    No. We are way on the other side of the state. Lancaster county - about an hour and a half from Philadelphia, Pa. and 45mins from Baltimore, Md.

    I am from the south and had a really deep southern accent. I had lived in Arkansas, Texas, and Oklahoma. When I lived in Oklahoma - even other people with southern accents struggled to understand me. They said I had too thick of a southern accent (from my time in Arkansas). Then I moved to Pennsylvania an was immediately put in a speech class to get rid of the accent and relearn proper words (like to say shopping cart instead of buggy - it is especially confusing to say buggy for a shopping cart in Lancaster county when it is a heavily populated Amish community / tourist area). - But anyways, the accent is gone for the most part. I do spend a lot of time in Texas, so there is a slight southern drawl sometimes.

    People I know in Texas say that my kids and their dad have a slight nothern accent - but say I do not. When I ask people up here if I have a southern accent - they say no (except if I say lighter and socks - along with a few other words - then they point out that say those words "funny", not realizing it is the southern accent influencing them). I struggle to even say the word drawer at all. I usually end up saying in frustration "the thing you put your clothes in". It is the r and w sounds together in that word. It was even harder to say as a kid - I have gotten better.

    But I don't know that ANY of this relates to why I can't hear vowel sound differences that well.

    I also do not find myself having to look at people to hear them. I have pretty good hearing.  

    Also, while I can BETTER tell the differences of the short vowel sounds when doing them individually (I struggle a bit to do it). Where I REALLY get stumped is when they are IN a word - blended. So pIn, pEn, an pAn - stump me. I will say pIn an they will say I am saying pEn. I will say pEn and they will say I am saying pAn or pIn. If I say pEn casually - it comes off as pIn. If I TRY to say pEn - it comes off as pAn. I feel ridiculously stupid with this. These are kindergarten words and skills!!!

    Quoting bluerooffarm:

     Did you grow up near Pittsburgh?  Pittsburghese makes the sounds different.


     

  • celticdragon77
    June 15, 2013 at 6:38 PM

    That one link had me distracted for over an hour =)

    It was very interesting to compare how I say words, compared to the rest of the USA population. 

    For the most part, of what I looked at on the list, I say most words like the majority of people do. Things like "cauliflower" were WAY off. I say it with an a instead of an i. There a few others, but I don't remember them offhand.

    Quoting No_Difference:

     We've lived in WI, TX, GA, MD, and now WV. It took a lot of effort to make sure my daughter did not pick up a southern drawl while we lived in TX and GA. When we moved to MD it wasn't nearly as bad, and she did great. When we moved to WV, the teachers were telling her she was reading wrong. It took me a few years to realize, it was because she was actually articulating and saying all of her letter sounds as if they each had their own sound instead of slurring and "mushing" the sounds lol. She would come home with a HORRIBLE hill billy drawl where NONE of the letters had a distinct sound. I was SO mad, and it took me forever to get it through her head she is NOT to talk like that LOL. Her 2nd grade year, we had to restart phonics basically. We got All About Spelling and their phonics CD and I had her listen to those as she did her lessons. She would listen to the sound, and then we'd record her on the computer and play it back so she could hear how she was saying it in comparison. After awhile, she realized I was making her actually say the sounds correctly, and now she corrects me on certain words, for instance, where I grew up in WI, we said "ANT" for Aunt. She now gets mad at me, "No Mom. There is a u there that is influencing the A it is the /aw/ sound" lol.

    We did a fun little side project on accents after she started correcting me lol. Here's a few of the intersting sites:
    http://www.pbs.org/speak/seatosea/americanvarieties/map/map.html
    http://www4.uwm.edu/FLL/linguistics/dialect/maps.html

    I don't think I helped much, sorry.  

    Quoting celticdragon77:

    No. We are way on the other side of the state. Lancaster county - about an hour and a half from Philadelphia, Pa. and 45mins from Baltimore, Md.

    I am from the south and had a really deep southern accent. I had lived in Arkansas, Texas, and Oklahoma. When I lived in Oklahoma - even other people with southern accents struggled to understand me. They said I had too thick of a southern accent (from my time in Arkansas). Then I moved to Pennsylvania an was immediately put in a speech class to get rid of the accent and relearn proper words (like to say shopping cart instead of buggy - it is especially confusing to say buggy for a shopping cart in Lancaster county when it is a heavily populated Amish community / tourist area). - But anyways, the accent is gone for the most part. I do spend a lot of time in Texas, so there is a slight southern drawl sometimes.

    People I know in Texas say that my kids and their dad have a slight nothern accent - but say I do not. When I ask people up here if I have a southern accent - they say no (except if I say lighter and socks - along with a few other words - then they point out that say those words "funny", not realizing it is the southern accent influencing them). I struggle to even say the word drawer at all. I usually end up saying in frustration "the thing you put your clothes in". It is the r and w sounds together in that word. It was even harder to say as a kid - I have gotten better.

    But I don't know that ANY of this relates to why I can't hear vowel sound differences that well.

    I also do not find myself having to look at people to hear them. I have pretty good hearing.  

    Also, while I can BETTER tell the differences of the short vowel sounds when doing them individually (I struggle a bit to do it). Where I REALLY get stumped is when they are IN a word - blended. So pIn, pEn, an pAn - stump me. I will say pIn an they will say I am saying pEn. I will say pEn and they will say I am saying pAn or pIn. If I say pEn casually - it comes off as pIn. If I TRY to say pEn - it comes off as pAn. I feel ridiculously stupid with this. These are kindergarten words and skills!!!

    Quoting bluerooffarm:

     Did you grow up near Pittsburgh?  Pittsburghese makes the sounds different.


     


  • bluerooffarm
    June 15, 2013 at 9:31 PM

     I would still say it has to do with accents.  It took a lot of work to get my students in Western PA to understand their vowel sounds (in middle school!!)  due to their accents.  There's is more of a stressing the vowels and jamming everything else together though.

  • Crowsnest5
    June 16, 2013 at 7:15 AM

    I am the same way...also when an A is in front of an M too. They just do not sound the same. Also the WH sound in WHALE....just thought it was because i am from the south LOL!

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