Homeschooling Moms

MessedUpMama
Kindergarten reading
February 27, 2013 at 9:41 PM

DCG is having a hard time with reading. She is finally understanding that words are made of several sounds, and that each letter has a sound or sounds it makes. But she isn't getting the visual aspects of language. She knows most of her letters, and some of their sounds, but if she sees a word that starts with a ca she will always guess "cat", if she sees a word that ends with it she will always guess "sit" even when we have sounded out the words she will still just guess when asked to read it. It's so frustrating for me and for her. She doesn't get phonics, and I'm lost on how to help her. Anyone have any ideas?

Replies

  • romacox
    by romacox
    February 28, 2013 at 6:48 AM

    Messedupmama, who is not messed up :-), My children are  all grown, but  I am still a home school workshop leader, and a  tutor  specializing in readig.  My method has been so sucessful that I am now asked by college professors to teach their students my method.  Following are some things I do

    • If a child comes to me knowing their phonic sounds unable to blend them to form words, the first thing I do is ask them how they pronounce the sounds of  B,C,D,G,H,J,K,M,P,T, & W. For example if they are pronouncing H as Hu, and P as Pu,  they are decoding the word happy as Hu-a-pu-y making it hard for them to hear happy. The following video explains more.  I have even helped 6th graders with this problem.

    • The conventional method (workbooks, flashcards, lectures) teach to the left brain, and it work s   for only about 45% of the children. It does not work for the other 55%.   But whole brain teaching teaches to all of the learning styles.  I use the game  Ring Around The Phonics to teach reading, phonics (it comes with early reader books)  and other language  arts subjects including comprehension, and  listening skills.  It is whole brain teaching, and the kids love it.  They particularly like the activities, and crowning their character with the blue and gold rings of knowledge. 

    I

  • coala
    by coala
    February 28, 2013 at 8:56 AM

    Have you worked on blends themselves.  What I mean is a consonant and a vowel.  (ta, te, ti, to, tu).  They have to know vowel sounds.  You can't read if you don't know your vowels.  Start with the short vowel sounds.  Once they understand those and start actually reading CVC words then you can move onto long vowel sounds.  Just another way to look at.  I hope that you can get through to her.

  • hipmomto3
    February 28, 2013 at 9:44 AM
    I've used the book 'Teach your child to read in 100 lessons' with all 3 of my homeschooled kids. It works great. It builds slowly. Once they are 1/2 way thru the book we also incorporate easy readers (we also use Alphatales).
  • GELiz
    by GELiz
    February 28, 2013 at 9:46 AM

    Maybe she is just not yet ready. Don't get worried or panicked- just read to her. correct gently and when ready it will click.

  • debramommyof4
    February 28, 2013 at 9:50 AM
    My niece does this and my girls did it. I tell my niece to slow down and we cover all but one letter at a time and sound it out then we pit it together. It makes her brain slow down. Hope that helps
  • kirbymom
    February 28, 2013 at 4:28 PM

    We have done that too on occasion.  

    Quoting debramommyof4:

    My niece does this and my girls did it. I tell my niece to slow down and we cover all but one letter at a time and sound it out then we pit it together. It makes her brain slow down. Hope that helps


  • jen2150
    by jen2150
    February 28, 2013 at 7:44 PM

    She is not supposed to be reading in kindergarten.  Some do and some don't.  Just make it fun for her.  Play games and read as much as she will let you.  Keep helping her but make it fun and light.  It is more important to make it enjoyable.  Once i relaxed and stopped with expectations my son took off all on his own.  My son is in 3rd and is just know picking up on reading.  It takes time.  Remember motivation is the key to learning to read.  It is a very long process.  My older son went much faster.  My 3rd grader is taking off at lightening speed and picking up words all on his own now.  Be patient and it will come.

  • MessedUpMama
    February 28, 2013 at 9:23 PM

    Thank you everyone. She does know her vowel sounds, most of the time. She knows that how to pronounce -it for example. but she will add sounds that are not there and say "Flit" for fit, or change a sound and say "sit" when it's actually lit. We will sound it out and then I'll ask her what the word is and she will often make those mistakes. She will know a word one second and the next she will "forget" it. She's a wiz at math, she can write most letters very neatly the first time, especially if she can see it before she writes it or if it's something she knows how to write already, such as her name.

    Part of it is that she doesn't really care about reading. So far she hasn't needed to read so it doesn't seem important to her. I feel like most of the instruction is in one ear out the other with her when it comes to reading. Her mother doesn't really like to read, I doubt she's ever seen her read a book. So the attitude about reading is somewhat understandable.

    I'll try some of the ideas you ladies have given me and try to relax some. I know that she will eventually learn to read, I just wish I could see a glimmer now to give me some hope.

  • maggiemom2000
    February 28, 2013 at 9:26 PM

    Look through these activities. They are really hands on and engaging, more play based. She may need a little more background in phomeic awareness (more info on that in the articles)

    Growing Readers

    Are you Growing a Reader? Homeschooling your early reader? No need to buy an expensive curriculum to get your child off to a great start at reading. Do you want to avoid tedious, boring worksheets and instead learn through engaging hands on activities and play? Here are a collection of links on teaching your child to read and write for free:

    Sight Words or Phonics? How about a balanced approach?


    Some background on using a balanced literacy approach to teaching your child to read.

    Early Alphabet Learning and the Name Game

    How to begin teaching the alphabet and other early literacy skills to your preschooler or Kindergartner.

    Kindergarten Sight Words and Early Reading Skills

    What you need to know to get started teaching your Kindergartner to read including a look at some of the Common Core Standards for Kindergarten reading.

    Kindergarten Sight Word Sentences

    After you know about teaching sight words to your Kindergartner you are ready to move on to sentences.

    Kindergarten Sight Words Reading Books

    Once you start introducing your child to the sight words he is ready for his first emergent-reader book.

    Beginning Phonics for Emergent Readers

    Once your child knows most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds he is ready to learn to "sound out" simple words. This post shows you lots of hands on multi-sensory ways to practice early phonics.
  • MessedUpMama
    February 28, 2013 at 10:28 PM


    Thank you. I will look at these.

    Quoting maggiemom2000:

    Look through these activities. They are really hands on and engaging, more play based. She may need a little more background in phomeic awareness (more info on that in the articles)

Homeschooling Moms