Homeschooling Moms

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Truluv4ever
Ok, I Did it......................Now What?????????????????
February 13, 2013 at 10:36 AM

I took my daughter out of public school to start homeschooling. It was something we really had to do, I know we made the right choice! Now my questions are what are the most important subjects to teach? How many hours a day should we do school? We are on day 2 of homeschooling and she is getting bored!!!! How do I keep her excited and not bored? I feel a little lost here!!

We did math, english, reading and went to the library yesterday. Today I told her she would need to read & do a report on her non-fiction book and after she reads a bit we are starting a unit on the embargo act of 1807. Now I am picking up where she left off at, at school. I would love some ideas from you ladies! Please Help!

Replies

  • SusanTheWriter
    February 13, 2013 at 10:49 AM

    How old is she? What grade was she in? If she's been in school fr several years, you might want to consider a time of de-schooling before you dive back in. Homeschooling can be quite an adjustment. For now, reading, art projects, watching a few non-fiction documentary sorts of things, the occasional use of Khan Academy will keep her going.

    Did you have any plans in place before you withdrew her? You may want to take these few weeks of de-schooling to line up your goals, find out her learning style and your teaching style, figure out requirements, etc. You can also use this time to find homeschool groups and classes that can help get you guys involved with other families.

  • oredeb
    by oredeb
    February 13, 2013 at 11:42 AM

     what are you using to teach? what is she interested in? and what susan asked!

  • leighp1
    by leighp1
    February 13, 2013 at 12:02 PM

    I agree with Susan on de-schooling.  Let her get adjusted and don't swamp her with school stuff.  Homeschooling is not supposed to be just like school.  They learn differently and easier than being in the public school system. 

    Have you tried getting her interested in creating something?  That could be art (research her favorite artist and do something pertaining to that), build a website.  My daughter loves to do that.  She has 4 I think.  I honestly lost track.  She researches what interests her and then she creates her website.  Learning does not always mean books and papers.  It has taken me almost a year to actually figure that one out.  I decided not to try to keep up with the school.  I actually follow what my daughter wants and likes more than what the school offers.  That being said, we do still do all the subjects, just differently.  If that makes any sense.

  • usmom3
    by usmom3
    BJ
    February 13, 2013 at 12:08 PM
    All of this, taking a break to adjust to homeschooling is always my first piece of advice it makes everything so much easier.

    Quoting SusanTheWriter:

    How old is she? What grade was she in? If she's been in school fr several years, you might want to consider a time of de-schooling before you dive back in. Homeschooling can be quite an adjustment. For now, reading, art projects, watching a few non-fiction documentary sorts of things, the occasional use of Khan Academy will keep her going.

    Did you have any plans in place before you withdrew her? You may want to take these few weeks of de-schooling to line up your goals, find out her learning style and your teaching style, figure out requirements, etc. You can also use this time to find homeschool groups and classes that can help get you guys involved with other families.

  • QueenCreole313
    February 13, 2013 at 1:15 PM

    First of all CONGRATULATIONS for doing what is best for your daughter and having the balls to actually do it! Anywho, I too am new to Homeschooling. I would suggest reading books on it. I read several: Homeschooling for Dummies, various blogs and websites, etc. I'm also reading a book on Highly Sensitive Children (which is what I definitely have). I spent time writing down my goals for our home academy. I also talked with my son (10) about what he WANTS to learn. I did make a mistake with being too rigid and organized. This may work for some but it doesn't work for us. All it did was make us both anxious and moody. We are more relaxed, but follow what we both think is important.

    My son is bored easily, so I mix up how, when and where I teach. He is required to read for an hour a day, but can pick whatever he wants to read. For math, I use KhanAcademy.org, Kumon and other websites. It makes it fun for him. Science he has chosen to learn physics and I teach him astronomy, because I love it so much. We learn about OurStory (not history) which is a course I designed which combines history and our family history.

    I hope this helps! Have fun homeschooling!

  • aneela
    by aneela
    February 13, 2013 at 2:11 PM

    id look into an age appropriate curriculum or whatever style of homeschooling you want to do...first you need to figure that out IMO and then take it from there....each child is diff and whatever you want to do with be unique to each child...good luck!!

  • aneela
    by aneela
    February 13, 2013 at 2:11 PM

    find out what the laws are in your state for HS as well...

  • KrissyKC
    February 13, 2013 at 2:37 PM

    Yes, take time to de-school.   Don't rush it.  Unless you are only HSing for this year or something and plan to put her into school next year or something... don't feel you have to follow the school.

    Have a foundation for math, writing, reading (three R's..) but don't make them rigid unless that's what you and she want.   For example, we only "do" english 3-4 times weekly and fill in with lots of fun language arts stuff and language arts games.

    Examples:   We play bananagrams for spelling because my kids are both natural spellers, so other than doing vocab with our other subjects, they don't need a daily spelling lesson anymore.  My 8 yr old, I just have him correct words he spells wrong on papers, sound them out, and then respell them a few times.    He has even corrected MY spelling a few times!   I don't think they are missing anything, but then, they might want to do a spelling unit sometime.

    We also spend a lot of time memorizing scripture and bible questions and answers for a group they are in called Junior Bible Quiz.   They get to travel once a month to another town and compete in meets there.   So, daily, they spend 20 minutes twice a day practicing for that.

    They also have musical instruments they practice at least 3-4 times a week and go have lessons once a week.

    They also have homeschool choir they are involved in once a week plus an occasional performance.

    We have a set day of the week we hit the library and the local indoor pool for some excercise in the afternoons, so in the AM we do math, practices for stuff, and then head out for the day.

    We are just enjoying every day life and growing and learning from that.   Mine are 11, 8, (almost) 5, and 8 months.

    In the next couple years, we will get a tad bit more ridid for the older kids, because it's my belief they'll need to start being able to actually "perform" well and "prove" what they know so they can be prepped for college.

    Other people are relaxed all the way up, and they do just fine, too.



  • romacox
    by romacox
    February 13, 2013 at 4:04 PM

    Modern text books are full of misinformation,  because curriculum selection  is based on the good old boy system (I scratch your back and you scratch mine)  rather than truth, and what is in the best interest of the children.  

    For example: The word “welfare” is used in the Preamble of the Constitution and in two other places as well.  The 1828 edition of the word is: “2. Exemption from any unusual evil or calamity, the enjoyment of peace and prosperity, or the ordinary blessings of society and civil government; applied to states.” In today’s Webster’s edition “welfare is defined as “receiving government aid because of poverty, etc.

    Thomas Jefferson stated, ” Congress has not unlimited powers to provide for the general welfare, but only those specifically enumerated” (article I Section Eight). Yet many modern textbooks do not teach the original intent. 

    It is interesting to type in words like democracy and republic  into the online dictionary linked below to see how much those words have been changed from the time of our Founding Fathers. It is very surprising  http://machaut.uchicago.edu/websters

    ***********************************

    It might be a good opportunity  for you and your daughter  to research together the embargo act ,  and turn it into a discussion between the two of you so as to teach analytical thinking which is discouraged in public schools.  Following are some good resources to compare with the textbooks.

    The Tariff History Part I by Mises Institute. ( includes the embargo act)

    The U.S. History On Taxation (discusses tariffs)

    Videos: Judge Napolitano On The History Of Freedom

    Videos:  Judge Napolitano On The Constitution

    The following articles will give you some ideas about how to make the subjects interesting, and how to teach analytical thinking (How to think rather than what to think)  How To Home School   

  • Truluv4ever
    February 13, 2013 at 10:11 PM

    WOW! Wonderful replies from all of you, Thank-You!! I am definetly going to use your suggestions and try your ideas on teaching and learning.

    I did find out all of the laws for homeschooling in our state(NH). I did notify the school properly. My daughter is 13 1/2 years old and in 8th. grade. She is interested in so many things and she is very bright, she needs to be challenged. She is above grade level in every subject. She is very interested in art, she's an excellent artist in many mediums. She's interested in poetry, photography, history, cartooning ect.! In school she finished 8th. grade math and was in 9th. grade algebra. Again, Thanks for helping us~

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