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SusanTheWriter
History trouble
October 2, 2012 at 6:49 PM

DD (10th grade) is doing US History this year. It's never been her favorite subject, but tough potatoes. It's gotta get done. We're using A Patriot's History of the United States as our text, and supplementing with our American Lit study. We finally finished The Scarlet Letter, which she hated. Again, tough potatoes. Now she can whine along with the rest of the country going back generations who have had to read it. Shared misery and all that.

So I get that this isn't going to be fun for her. On top of that, we had a really rough beginning to our year and we're only just now starting to catch back up with things. We actually started history and Lit over a month ago and she did the final essay on TSL yesterday and finished the essay portion of the Ch 1 test for history today.

She rocked the essay, but failed the test epically. It was like she didn't even read the chapter, which is weird considering how insightful the essay was. And honestly, it's usually the other way around. She aces the test and bombs the essay.

My idea right now is for her to just re-read the text, but I'll be more hands on with each portion, doing discussion questions along the way, and then she'll re-take the test. But is that the right approach?

I really, really don't want to start over with curriculum at this point. And my problem with a lot of the "living" books are that they simply aren't advanced enough.

Not sure which way to jump here. Any advice?

Replies

  • SusanTheWriter
    October 3, 2012 at 11:38 AM

    We do have movies on the slate, but our DVD player is wonky at the moment so we weren't able to watch The Scarlet Letter.

    But we'll be watching The Patriot and the HBO miniseries about John Adams about the time we hit Ch 3-5 and cover the build-up, the Revolutionary War, and the aftermath.

  • swim-mom72
    October 3, 2012 at 2:25 PM

    Narration and notebooking are tried and tue standards in our homeschool for history and science. Both help develope skills that the student will use in college for sure, but also in regular life.

     Oh, did I mention notebooking? : ) There are so many ways to implement this skill into your homeschool. Every homeschooler I have known who uses this method, does it differently. The key reasons for using notebooking would be to teach notetaking skills, for the student to come up with creative ways to display some key points, and for review.

  • almondpigeon
    October 3, 2012 at 5:47 PM

    Netflix has a lot of really great documentaries.  As far as watching movies & mini-series, just make sure you research the historical accuracy before hand.  I'm actually a giant history nerd & most mainstream movies/mini-series have been "hollywooded" to make them more interesting. Oooh, if we lived closer, I could come do history with your daughter & you could come do lit with my son.  :)

  • kirbymom
    October 3, 2012 at 8:01 PM

    This..... 

    Quoting oredeb:

     what about reading portions and letting her tell you what shes read?

    or have her teach your younger kids american history(real hands on!)

    or have her make a power point on portions of it and forget the test! 

     or have her make american history tapes for the kids, let her read it and make it interesting on tape.

    or tell her if she doesnt do better on the test shes gona be reading this section the rest of the year!

    is this what shes reading http://mhsamericanhistory.wikispaces.com/file/view/A+Patriot's+History+of+the+United+States.pdf

    or she could write down in a journal the people she reads about in each chapter and tell a bit about them (writing!!!)and what the chapter is about and forget the test!

    I also think you going back and doing....."My idea right now is for her to just re-read the text, but I'll be more hands on with each portion, doing discussion questions along the way, and then she'll re-take the test. But is that the right approach??     YES!!!!!

  • mama3814
    October 4, 2012 at 1:01 AM

     

    Quoting almondpigeon:

    Netflix has a lot of really great documentaries.  As far as watching movies & mini-series, just make sure you research the historical accuracy before hand.  I'm actually a giant history nerd & most mainstream movies/mini-series have been "hollywooded" to make them more interesting. Oooh, if we lived closer, I could come do history with your daughter & you could come do lit with my son.  :)


    My son and I watched part of the PBS documentary (drama), "We Shall Remain", on Netflix earlier today. Have you seen any part of it? If so, what do you think about its historical accuracy? We're starting to cover westward expansion, and I thought this series might be interesting.

  • almondpigeon
    October 4, 2012 at 9:11 AM

    I've never seen that one.  But, usually, if I watch a doc that piques my interest, I'll spend the next week researching like a crazy woman. I would make a fantastic student! 

  • SalemWitchChild
    October 4, 2012 at 9:17 AM

    Well I don't know what is right for her. But I'll tell you what my HS history teacher did. All year long SHE read from the text and dictated notes. The students wrote down the notes and kept it all year. Every week there was  a small test on what was covered up till then. By the end of the year I could recite my notes by memory.

  • KickButtMama
    October 4, 2012 at 10:21 AM
    Quoting mama3814:




    I have that series on my instant que. we loved it! I think it's a great representation of what most historians agree on regarding Native American history. Whether that makes it true or not is always up for debate, but it is a great base for learning about Native Americans from the moment the Europeans arrived.

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