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kinshipcaremama
Adaptive Assessment
January 29, 2013 at 4:36 PM
My son turned 22 years old today. In order to continue his services as an adult he had to have an adaptive assesment. This was such a depressing process! I am so proud of the progress he has made but this assessment focuses on what he CAN'T do. It just reminds me how very disabled he really is. I'm sad just thinking about it and we haven't even gotten the report yet. I wish there was a better way to do this!

Replies

  • VioletsMomTown
    January 29, 2013 at 8:48 PM

    Aww, I'm sorry that was so hard. I hate the evaluations, I hear you there. I wish it was different too, we do tend to get all the bad stuff, and none of the good. It would be lovely to have an assessment done just for the positives, wouldn't it?

  • lucasmadre
    January 29, 2013 at 9:04 PM

    When we do out IEP at school the OT woman always takes a few minutes to talk about what my son has accomplished. She sees the best in him and what he is capable of while everyone else is busy trying to solve problems (myself included.) 

    I think it should be mandatory that with every evaluation a child gets that their strengths should be stated as well as their weaknesses. ESPECIALLY when they are older and attend the evaluation results or know enough to ask about them. How we all feel about ourselves effects how we function in the world and our kids are no different. A little encouragement goes a long way. I wrote a note to my son recently listing all the things he is wonderful at...he put it up in his wall and loves it dearly. Who doesn't need positive reinforcement? The system will change, it takes time. In the meantime write him a card about how great you think he is...good luck.

  • MomOfOneCoolKid
    January 29, 2013 at 9:26 PM

     


    Quoting lucasmadre:

    When we do out IEP at school the OT woman always takes a few minutes to talk about what my son has accomplished. She sees the best in him and what he is capable of while everyone else is busy trying to solve problems (myself included.) 

    I think it should be mandatory that with every evaluation a child gets that their strengths should be stated as well as their weaknesses. ESPECIALLY when they are older and attend the evaluation results or know enough to ask about them. How we all feel about ourselves effects how we function in the world and our kids are no different. A little encouragement goes a long way. I wrote a note to my son recently listing all the things he is wonderful at...he put it up in his wall and loves it dearly. Who doesn't need positive reinforcement? The system will change, it takes time. In the meantime write him a card about how great you think he is...good luck.

    That is a wonderful idea. They kinda wanted to do that at ds' IEP, but I focused on what needed to be solved.

    Right now ds is only 4 so he doesn't attend.

    When he gets older, i don't even know if I want him there. Its so depressing how they present things.

     

    OP, I would say as lucasmom said, keep focusing on the positives, both for you and for your ds and what you would like for him in the short term. What would you like for him in the short term?

     

  • emarin77
    January 30, 2013 at 3:09 PM

    What was the adaptive assessment for?

  • kinshipcaremama
    January 30, 2013 at 3:58 PM
    The assessment was to determine continued eligibility for SSI and state services. All people with developmental disabilities have to be evaluated by their 22 birthday to make sure they still qualify. They had interviews with his assistant, doctor and therapist as well as an evaluation of his life skills in self care and social skills among other things. The psychologist told us it was specifically to determine what he cannot do. It's a really depressing process.
  • MomOfOneCoolKid
    January 30, 2013 at 4:00 PM

     


    Quoting kinshipcaremama:

    The assessment was to determine continued eligibility for SSI and state services. All people with developmental disabilities have to be evaluated by their 22 birthday to make sure they still qualify. They had interviews with his assistant, doctor and therapist as well as an evaluation of his life skills in self care and social skills among other things. The psychologist told us it was specifically to determine what he cannot do. It's a really depressing process.


     The good news is though, that he is going to continue to receive SSI thought, right? And maybe other services.

  • kinshipcaremama
    January 30, 2013 at 4:08 PM
    Yes. He has made enormous improvement since he was diagnosed but he still needs a LOT of help. We have more than adequate services available and I am grateful for all of them but the assesment process is frustrating. I do think this will be the last formal assessment he will ever have to have.
  • vstil
    by vstil
    February 1, 2013 at 8:16 PM

    It's so important to give him the tools he needs to manage as much of his own life as possible.  Depending on his needs, get him using a visual scheduler with promptings that remind him to do things, such as take the garbage out, feed the dog, take his meds, catch a bus... etc.  

    An iPod touch or iPad can support this type of tool well. This technique will build his confidence and self-determination skills.  

    Don't hesisitate to ask me any questions.. I work in the field of Assistive Technology - specifically software tools designed for self-management and independent living. We believe that people should have every opportunity to maximize the best lives they can have... and most of all, control as much of their own life as possible.  

  • darbyakeep45
    February 2, 2013 at 6:09 AM

    Hugs mama!!!

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