Autism - Support Across the Spectrum

ROGUEM
Does your child exhibit these classic symptoms they use for diagnosis?
by ROGUEM
December 8, 2011 at 10:46 AM

 Does your child exhibit these classic symptoms they use for diagnosis?

Since I have more that one I answered below :)

I thought this might help new members who are trying to decide if their children have autism or not.  Many times if a child doesn't exhibit a couple of these, they want to conclude that their child can't have autism.  I know I thought this in the early days too.  You want to cling to anything. I wish I could have seen that there are many autistic people that  do only a handful of the things on this list.  It would have made me accept it sooner.  By showing that your child doesn't have to have all of them to have autism, maybe a mom might realize the list is not all inclusive. 

I also think it is interesting to see the similiarites and differences between our children.  I know my 3 are so different.

Some autistic traits could include:

  • Scatter/splinter skills of abilities –
    • such as poor gross motor or fine motor skills and the ability to read at a very young age
  • Oversensitive or under sensitive to pain
  • Desire for the same daily schedule, toys, type of clothes or an insistent on “sameness”
  • Repeating words, phrases in place of typical language or conversation (This is known as echolalia)
  • Much difficulty expressing needs – they may use pointing, gestures versus words, or tantrums
  • Finding situations funny or laughing at times when it is inappropriate (i.e., laughing at a baby crying.)
  • Activity is noticeably under active or over active
  • Excessive or frequent tantrums
  • Can be aggressive or self injurious
  • Prefers to be alone – may have social skills deficits
  • Autistics can act deaf or be non responsive to verbal cues
  • Odd play such as; spinning objects, or using toys for something besides there their intended purpose or using an odd attraction to an item that is inappropriate for age
  • Non existent or poor eye contact
  • Non responsive to typical teaching methods
  • May respond negatively to crowds or not able to mix well with others
  • Difficulty with holding a conversation
  • May not like hugs, or to be cuddled.
  • Sensitivity to loud noises, tags in clothes, coarse clothing, lights, and smells
  • Frequently uses peripheral vision to track items (e.g., rolling car along countertop at eye-level)
  • Highly self-limited diet (narrow down foods they’ll eat to a very limited few items when previously a broader range was accepted (e.g., bread, chicken nuggets, cheese, milk, and crackers – period.)
  • A high amount of severe food allergies
  • History of chronic ear infections as an infant
  • Severe gastro-intestinal issues; chronic loose and/or foul-smelling stools.
  • Lack of imaginative play or imitation.

Replies

  • ROGUEM
    by ROGUEM
    December 8, 2011 at 10:53 AM

     Matthew

    • Scatter/splinter skills of abilities –
      • such as poor gross motor or fine motor skills and the ability to read at a very young age yes
    • Oversensitive or under sensitive to pain yes
    • Desire for the same daily schedule, toys, type of clothes or an insistent on “sameness” yes
    • Repeating words, phrases in place of typical language or conversation (This is known as echolalia) no
    • Much difficulty expressing needs – they may use pointing, gestures versus words, or tantrums no
    • Finding situations funny or laughing at times when it is inappropriate (i.e., laughing at a baby crying.) no
    • Activity is noticeably under active or over active no
    • Excessive or frequent tantrums no
    • Can be aggressive or self injurious no
    • Prefers to be alone – may have social skills deficits yes
    • Autistics can act deaf or be non responsive to verbal cues yes
    • Odd play such as; spinning objects, or using toys for something besides there their intended purpose or using an odd attraction to an item that is inappropriate for age yes
    • Non existent or poor eye contact no
    • Non responsive to typical teaching methods yes
    • May respond negatively to crowds or not able to mix well with others yes
    • Difficulty with holding a conversation yes
    • May not like hugs, or to be cuddled. no
    • Sensitivity to loud noises, tags in clothes, coarse clothing, lights, and smells yes
    • Frequently uses peripheral vision to track items (e.g., rolling car along countertop at eye-level) no
    • Highly self-limited diet (narrow down foods they’ll eat to a very limited few items when  previously a broader range was accepted (e.g., bread, chicken nuggets, cheese, milk, and crackers – period.) yes
    • A high amount of severe food allergies  OH YES
    • History of chronic ear infections as an infant no
    • Severe gastro-intestinal issues; chronic loose and/or foul-smelling stools. no
    • Lack of imaginative play or imitation. no
  • ROGUEM
    by ROGUEM
    December 8, 2011 at 10:55 AM

     Stephen

    • Scatter/splinter skills of abilities –
      • such as poor gross motor or fine motor skills and the ability to read at a very young age yes
    • Oversensitive or under sensitive to pain yes
    • Desire for the same daily schedule, toys, type of clothes or an insistent on “sameness” yes
    • Repeating words, phrases in place of typical language or conversation (This is known as echolalia) yes
    • Much difficulty expressing needs – they may use pointing, gestures versus words, or tantrums yes
    • Finding situations funny or laughing at times when it is inappropriate (i.e., laughing at a baby crying.) yes
    • Activity is noticeably under active or over active yes
    • Excessive or frequent tantrums no
    • Can be aggressive or self injurious no
    • Prefers to be alone – may have social skills deficits yes
    • Autistics can act deaf or be non responsive to verbal cues yes
    • Odd play such as; spinning objects, or using toys for something besides there their intended purpose or using an odd attraction to an item that is inappropriate for age yes
    • Non existent or poor eye contact yes
    • Non responsive to typical teaching methods yes
    • May respond negatively to crowds or not able to mix well with others yes
    • Difficulty with holding a conversation yes
    • May not like hugs, or to be cuddled. no
    • Sensitivity to loud noises, tags in clothes, coarse clothing, lights, and smells yes
    • Frequently uses peripheral vision to track items (e.g., rolling car along countertop at eye-level) yes
    • Highly self-limited diet (narrow down foods they’ll eat to a very limited few items when  previously a broader range was accepted (e.g., bread, chicken nuggets, cheese, milk, and crackers – period.) yes
    • A high amount of severe food allergies   YES
    • History of chronic ear infections as an infant no
    • Severe gastro-intestinal issues; chronic loose and/or foul-smelling stools. yes
    • Lack of imaginative play or imitation. yes
  • ROGUEM
    by ROGUEM
    December 8, 2011 at 10:59 AM

     Jonathan

    • Scatter/splinter skills of abilities –
      • such as poor gross motor or fine motor skills and the ability to read at a very young age yes
    • Oversensitive or under sensitive to pain yes
    • Desire for the same daily schedule, toys, type of clothes or an insistent on “sameness” yes
    • Repeating words, phrases in place of typical language or conversation (This is known as echolalia) no
    • Much difficulty expressing needs – they may use pointing, gestures versus words, or tantrums yes
    • Finding situations funny or laughing at times when it is inappropriate (i.e., laughing at a baby crying.) yes
    • Activity is noticeably under active or over active yes
    • Excessive or frequent tantrums yes
    • Can be aggressive or self injurious yes
    • Prefers to be alone – may have social skills deficits no
    • Autistics can act deaf or be non responsive to verbal cues yes
    • Odd play such as; spinning objects, or using toys for something besides there their intended purpose or using an odd attraction to an item that is inappropriate for age yes
    • Non existent or poor eye contact no
    • Non responsive to typical teaching methods no
    • May respond negatively to crowds or not able to mix well with others yes
    • Difficulty with holding a conversation yes
    • May not like hugs, or to be cuddled. no
    • Sensitivity to loud noises, tags in clothes, coarse clothing, lights, and smells yes
    • Frequently uses peripheral vision to track items (e.g., rolling car along countertop at eye-level) yes
    • Highly self-limited diet (narrow down foods they’ll eat to a very limited few items when  previously a broader range was accepted (e.g., bread, chicken nuggets, cheese, milk, and crackers – period.) yes
    • A high amount of severe food allergies  no
    • History of chronic ear infections as an infant no
    • Severe gastro-intestinal issues; chronic loose and/or foul-smelling stools. yes
    • Lack of imaginative play or imitation. no
  • RockinMama0608
    December 8, 2011 at 11:02 AM

    I only have one child on the spectrum, but these were the traits he displayed before his diagnosis:

    • Scatter/splinter skills of abilities –
      • such as poor gross motor or fine motor skills and the ability to read at a very young age
    • Oversensitive or under sensitive to pain
    • Much difficulty expressing needs – they may use pointing, gestures versus words, or tantrums
    • Finding situations funny or laughing at times when it is inappropriate (i.e., laughing at a baby crying.)
    • Activity is noticeably under active or over active
    • Excessive or frequent tantrums
    • Can be aggressive or self injurious
    • Prefers to be alone – may have social skills deficits
    • Autistics can act deaf or be non responsive to verbal cues  (My son IS deaf but was non responsive to signs or pictures)
    • Odd play such as; spinning objects, or using toys for something besides there their intended purpose or using an odd attraction to an item that is inappropriate for age
    • Non existent or poor eye contact
    • Non responsive to typical teaching methods
    • May respond negatively to crowds or not able to mix well with others
    • Frequently uses peripheral vision to track items (e.g., rolling car along countertop at eye-level)
    • Highly self-limited diet (narrow down foods they’ll eat to a very limited few items when previously a broader range was accepted (e.g., bread, chicken nuggets, cheese, milk, and crackers – period.)
    • Lack of imaginative play or imitation.


  • megs2boys
    December 8, 2011 at 11:05 AM

    Well Sam is a little bit of a different "case" because he has several other underlying health issues.


    • Scatter/splinter skills of abilities – YES
      • such as poor gross motor or fine motor skills and the ability to read at a very young age
    • Oversensitive or under sensitive to pain UNDERSENSITIVE
    • Desire for the same daily schedule, toys, type of clothes or an insistent on “sameness” YES
    • Repeating words, phrases in place of typical language or conversation (This is known as echolalia) HE HAS NO LANGUAGE AT ALL
    • Much difficulty expressing needs – they may use pointing, gestures versus words, or tantrums HE HAS NO GESTURES OR POINTING AT ALL
    • Finding situations funny or laughing at times when it is inappropriate (i.e., laughing at a baby crying.) NO
    • Activity is noticeably under active or over active YES
    • Excessive or frequent tantrums NO
    • Can be aggressive or self injurious NOT INTENTIONALLY
    • Prefers to be alone – may have social skills deficits YES
    • Autistics can act deaf or be non responsive to verbal cues BIG YES
    • Odd play such as; spinning objects, or using toys for something besides there their intended purpose or using an odd attraction to an item that is inappropriate for age YES
    • Non existent or poor eye contact YES
    • Non responsive to typical teaching methods YES
    • May respond negatively to crowds or not able to mix well with others YES GETS VERY AGITATED AND OVERSTIMULATED
    • Difficulty with holding a conversation NO SPEECH
    • May not like hugs, or to be cuddled. YES =(
    • Sensitivity to loud noises, tags in clothes, coarse clothing, lights, and smells NOISES
    • Frequently uses peripheral vision to track items (e.g., rolling car along countertop at eye-level) HOLDS EVERYTHING UP TO HIS FACE 
    • Highly self-limited diet (narrow down foods they’ll eat to a very limited few items when previously a broader range was accepted (e.g., bread, chicken nuggets, cheese, milk, and crackers – period.) G-TUBE FED ONLY
    • A high amount of severe food allergies NOT THAT WE KNOW OF
    • History of chronic ear infections as an infant YES
    • Severe gastro-intestinal issues; chronic loose and/or foul-smelling stools. NO
    • Lack of imaginative play or imitation. YES

    In addition Sam does not respond to his name at all. He has no communication whatsoever. He prefers to be in one room of the house only. Even though we have no gates he never ventures out of that room. He does not interact with people at all. He spends a significant amount of time rocking and flapping. Once he gets started he cannot stop. Has a major lack of self control =( He gets over stimulated and overwhelmed very easily and quickly.

  • britniwheeler
    December 8, 2011 at 11:13 AM

     You know some thing I find VERY annoying.... I was able to teach my son how to read at age 4. He picked it up very easily and reads large words. He is now 7 and has been in his top reading groups since he started school. He is also very good with numbers. People think that just because he is verbal and can read that he is high functioning. His IQ scores were so varied that it showed what we had been trying to say all a long. He is moderate to low functioning in memory, processing speed and daily living. I wish people had a better understanding of Autism. Just because some one can read does not mean that he is high functioning or doesn't have Autism at all. (I have gotten these comments all too often).

    My son really meets all of these. It is incredible that we didn't notice some of this stuff sooner. The only thing that our son doesn't do is throw temper tantrums. He is the opposite of aggressive. He whines and cries way too much about the dumbest stuff or what appears to be nothing, but never forceful temper tantrums. It goes to show that every child on the spectrum is different.

  • ROGUEM
    by ROGUEM
    December 8, 2011 at 11:18 AM

     This frustrates me too.  Many professionals forget or just don't understand that our kids have very skeltered skills.  They can have high IQ's and  not be able to dress themselves.  That is a main part of their disability.  These professionals tend to forget to look at  the whole picture rather than focusing on the one skill they excel at.

    Quoting britniwheeler:

     You know some thing I find VERY annoying.... I was able to teach my son how to read at age 4. He picked it up very easily and reads large words. He is now 7 and has been in his top reading groups since he started school. He is also very good with numbers. People think that just because he is verbal and can read that he is high functioning. His IQ scores were so varied that it showed what we had been trying to say all a long. He is moderate to low functioning in memory, processing speed and daily living. I wish people had a better understanding of Autism. Just because some one can read does not mean that he is high functioning or doesn't have Autism at all. (I have gotten these comments all too often).

    My son really meets all of these. It is incredible that we didn't notice some of this stuff sooner. The only thing that our son doesn't do is throw temper tantrums. He is the opposite of aggressive. He whines and cries way too much about the dumbest stuff or what appears to be nothing, but never forceful temper tantrums. It goes to show that every child on the spectrum is different.

     

  • smarieljlee
    December 8, 2011 at 11:22 AM


    Quoting ROGUEM:

     Does your child exhibit these classic symptoms they use for diagnosis?

    Since I have more that one I answered below :)

    I thought this might help new members who are trying to decide if their children have autism or not.  Many times if a child doesn't exhibit a couple of these, they want to conclude that their child can't have autism.  I know I thought this in the early days too.  You want to cling to anything. I wish I could have seen that there are many autistic people that only do have the things on this list.  It would have made me accept it sooner.  By showing that your child doesn't have to have all of them to have autism, maybe a mom might realize the list is not all inclusive. 

    I also think it is interesting to see the similiarites and differences between our children.  I know my 3 are so different.

    Some autistic traits could include:

    • Scatter/splinter skills of abilities –
      • such as poor gross motor or fine motor skills and the ability to read at a very young age    Fine/Gross motor issues. She is still learning to read
    • Oversensitive or under sensitive to pain
    • Desire for the same daily schedule, toys, type of clothes or an insistent on “sameness” NO at home. YES at school
    • Repeating words, phrases in place of typical language or conversation (This is known as echolalia)  YES
    • Much difficulty expressing needs – they may use pointing, gestures versus words, or tantrums YES AND NO
    • Finding situations funny or laughing at times when it is inappropriate (i.e., laughing at a baby crying.)  NO
    • Activity is noticeably under active or over active  YES
    • Excessive or frequent tantrums  YES
    • Can be aggressive or self injurious  NO
    • Prefers to be alone – may have social skills deficits  YES and NO Prefers to play with others but lacks the skills to join in
    • Autistics can act deaf or be non responsive to verbal cues YES
    • Odd play such as; spinning objects, or using toys for something besides there their intended purpose or using an odd attraction to an item that is inappropriate for age  YES
    • Non existent or poor eye contact  YES
    • Non responsive to typical teaching methods  YES
    • May respond negatively to crowds or not able to mix well with others  IT DEPENDS
    • Difficulty with holding a conversation YES unless it is a high interest topic
    • May not like hugs, or to be cuddled. NO
    • Sensitivity to loud noises, tags in clothes, coarse clothing, lights, and smells CLOTHES AND SHOES
    • Frequently uses peripheral vision to track items (e.g., rolling car along countertop at eye-level) YES
    • Highly self-limited diet (narrow down foods they’ll eat to a very limited few items when previously a broader range was accepted (e.g., bread, chicken nuggets, cheese, milk, and crackers – period.)  NO
    • A high amount of severe food allergies NO
    • History of chronic ear infections as an infant NO
    • Severe gastro-intestinal issues; chronic loose and/or foul-smelling stools. NO
    • Lack of imaginative play or imitation.  NO


  • britniwheeler
    December 8, 2011 at 11:27 AM

     I agree with you totally. We were lucky when we came across our current psychologist. He specializes in Autism and really understands what we are going through. Many of the other professionals that Douglas is working with want to push him out of the programs because he is doing well with the one on one therapies. He was only in Physical Therapy for two days and she said she wanted to phase him out. Yet, he still lays on the table to do his home work and clearly is struggling with poor core muscles in his daily life. He also is still having an issue with the femoral anteversion and is being seen by an pediatric orthopedic specialist for pronation. Those are things she could be working on. Why would the evaluation come to say that he needs 4 months of PT, then after two 1 hour sessions you say he could be done soon?! Seriously. It is irritating that people just don't understand. Enviroments and time of the day make a big difference with these kids. How my son acts in school isn't how he is acting in therapy. Symptoms get overlooked so often by many professionals my son is working with. It makes me want to scream!

    Quoting ROGUEM:

     This frustrates me too.  Many professionals forget or just don't understand that our kids have very skeltered skills.  They can have high IQ's and  not be able to dress themselves.  That is a main part of their disability.  These professionals tend to forget to look at  the whole picture rather than focusing on the one skill they excel at.

    Quoting britniwheeler:

     You know some thing I find VERY annoying.... I was able to teach my son how to read at age 4. He picked it up very easily and reads large words. He is now 7 and has been in his top reading groups since he started school. He is also very good with numbers. People think that just because he is verbal and can read that he is high functioning. His IQ scores were so varied that it showed what we had been trying to say all a long. He is moderate to low functioning in memory, processing speed and daily living. I wish people had a better understanding of Autism. Just because some one can read does not mean that he is high functioning or doesn't have Autism at all. (I have gotten these comments all too often).

    My son really meets all of these. It is incredible that we didn't notice some of this stuff sooner. The only thing that our son doesn't do is throw temper tantrums. He is the opposite of aggressive. He whines and cries way too much about the dumbest stuff or what appears to be nothing, but never forceful temper tantrums. It goes to show that every child on the spectrum is different.

     

     

  • JohnnyCakes
    December 8, 2011 at 11:28 AM

    My daughter is having a neuro-eval in January and I'm curious to see what her IQ will be because her skills vary so much even day to day. When she started kindgergarten she was testing out of the educational aspects of it, because we wanted her to be able to focus on the social things. Well, over the last few weeks she cannot label her letters in the alphabet but she still can recognize and write all her sight words. It's driving me bonkers! :/ We've had a few people in the past, even ourselves, question her dx (even thought she would drop the dx for awhile there!) but then it's like we get a reminder, "Oh. She is definitely autistic." Just kind of depends on the day for her. 

    Quoting ROGUEM:

     This frustrates me too.  Many professionals forget or just don't understand that our kids have very skeltered skills.  They can have high IQ's and  not be able to dress themselves.  That is a main part of their disability.  These professionals tend to forget to look at  the whole picture rather than focusing on the one skill they excel at.

    Quoting britniwheeler:

     You know some thing I find VERY annoying.... I was able to teach my son how to read at age 4. He picked it up very easily and reads large words. He is now 7 and has been in his top reading groups since he started school. He is also very good with numbers. People think that just because he is verbal and can read that he is high functioning. His IQ scores were so varied that it showed what we had been trying to say all a long. He is moderate to low functioning in memory, processing speed and daily living. I wish people had a better understanding of Autism. Just because some one can read does not mean that he is high functioning or doesn't have Autism at all. (I have gotten these comments all too often).

    My son really meets all of these. It is incredible that we didn't notice some of this stuff sooner. The only thing that our son doesn't do is throw temper tantrums. He is the opposite of aggressive. He whines and cries way too much about the dumbest stuff or what appears to be nothing, but never forceful temper tantrums. It goes to show that every child on the spectrum is different.

     


Autism - Support Across the Spectrum