Meal Planning

SweetLuci
Christmas in Sweden
December 10, 2012 at 1:53 PM

 

What are some of the Swedish Holiday Traditions?

On December 13, one of the darkest days of the year, St. Lucia Day, or the Festival of Lights, is celebrated throughout Sweden to symbolize the promise of the sun's return. In the past, a young girl would dress in a white gown with a red sash and a wreath of lit candles on her head. She would go from house to house offering baked goods.

Today, the tradition continues with the oldest girl in a family wearing the traditional dress with a wreath of (battery-powered) candles on her head, awakening everyone with a song and saffron buns and coffee.

According to legend, Lucia was a young girl that lived during the fourth century. She was blinded for her Christian beliefs. St. Lucia is the patron saint of the blind.

For a Swedish Christmas dinner, sit down to a table of:

  • Ham
  • Lutefisk (fish soaked in lye)
  • Boiled wheat (cuccidata)
  • Cabbage pudding
  • Baby potatoes
  • Sweet carrots
  • Medley of vegetables
  • Deviled eggs
  • Julglögg (a hot, mulled wine)
  • Fruit salad
  • Saffron buns with raisins
  • Rice pudding
  • Lingonberry pie
  • Broomstick cookies (a lacy cookie with almonds and butter)
  • Pepparkakor (sweet ginger)

 

Replies

  • aenima49
    December 10, 2012 at 2:24 PM

    Fish soaked in lye???

  • 4kidz916
    December 10, 2012 at 3:29 PM

    Interesting. 

  • Stacie03
    December 10, 2012 at 4:11 PM
    My DF is Swedish and says this is nasty! I can only imagine.

    Quoting aenima49:

    Fish soaked in lye???

  • DissieDothe
    December 11, 2012 at 12:44 AM

    Food lye not soap lye. But I think that I'd skip the Lutefisk if I didn't know the cook. Reading that they use lye water for making pretzels & bagels, I'm going back to the Julia Childs video where she makes bagels.

     

  • lillucky8
    December 11, 2012 at 8:16 AM
    Thanks :)
  • jessicasmom1
    December 11, 2012 at 8:26 AM

    interesting thanks

  • August07Mom
    December 11, 2012 at 10:11 AM

    Interesting, thanks!

  • SweetLuci
    December 11, 2012 at 9:25 PM

    That's what I've been told.  It  starts out as salt-dried fish, then after the lye-safe for food-it ends up a gelatinous blob. I don't think I'd care for it.

    Quoting Stacie03:

    My DF is Swedish and says this is nasty! I can only imagine.

    Quoting aenima49:

    Fish soaked in lye???

     

Meal Planning