Kids' Health

TonyaLea
Aspergers, no more
December 4, 2012 at 12:51 AM

Have you heard that APA has officially dropped Aspergers from their manual?  Most people close to the subject have been expecting this change for a while, but it is now official.

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-204_162-57556754/aspergers-syndrome-dropped-from-american-psychiatric-association-manual/

"The familiar "Asperger's," along with some similar disorders, will be lumped together under autism spectrum disorder, "to help more accurately and consistently diagnose children with autism," the APA said in a statement.

Other changes include entries for new disorders such as "hoarding disorder" or "disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD)," the latter characterized by abnormally bad and frequent temper tantrums. "Dyslexia" and other learning disorders that some feared would be removed from the manual, remained."

Do you know anyone previously diagnosed with Aspergers?  Do you fear that these changes will affect their care?

Replies

  • kailu1835
    December 5, 2012 at 2:08 PM

    Aspergers has always been considered to be on the autism spectrum, so I doubt this will have any affect.

  • gwebkeijmmm
    December 5, 2012 at 2:18 PM

    They will receive more care, therapies, opportunities in school... This is a GOOD thing. 

  • JP-StrongForTwo
    December 5, 2012 at 2:23 PM

    It seems my daughter will fall into the level 2 category. 

    Quoting A_McCool:

    It is suspected that I have Asperger's Syndrome/High functioning Autism, but I do not have an official diagnosis. I think it a good thing; I think it will offer more opportunities for help for kids diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome.  I think the main thing about the change is the streamlining of the diagnostic terminology.   I like the new criteria, and I think it will better identify people on the ASD spectrum.

    Here is the new criteria.


    American Psychiatric Association DSM-5 Development

    (Retrieved from www.dsm5.org)

    Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Must meet criteria A, B, C, and D:

    A. Persistent deficits in social communication and social interaction across contexts, not accounted for by general developmental delays, and manifest by all 3 of the following:

    1. Deficits in social-emotional reciprocity; ranging from abnormal social approach and failure of normal back and forth conversation through reduced sharing of interests, emotions, and affect and response to total lack of initiation of social interaction,
    2. Deficits in nonverbal communicative behaviors used for social interaction; ranging from poorly integrated- verbal and nonverbal communication, through abnormalities in eye contact and body-language, or deficits in understanding and use of nonverbal communication, to total lack of facial expression or gestures.
    3. Deficits in developing and maintaining relationships, appropriate to developmental level (beyond those with caregivers); ranging from difficulties adjusting behavior to suit different social contexts through difficulties in sharing imaginative play and  in making friends  to an apparent absence of interest in people

    B. Restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities as manifested by at least two of the following:

    1. Stereotyped or repetitive speech, motor movements, or use of objects; (such as simple motor stereotypies, echolalia, repetitive use of objects, or idiosyncratic phrases). 
    2. Excessive adherence to routines, ritualized patterns of verbal or nonverbal behavior, or excessive resistance to change; (such as motoric rituals, insistence on same route or food, repetitive questioning or extreme distress at small changes).
    3. Highly restricted, fixated interests that are abnormal in intensity or focus; (such as strong attachment to or preoccupation with unusual objects, excessively circumscribed or perseverative interests).
    4. Hyper- or hypo-reactivity to sensory input or unusual interest in sensory aspects of environment; (such as apparent indifference to pain/heat/cold, adverse response to specific sounds or textures, excessive smelling or touching of objects, fascination with lights or spinning objects).

    C.    Symptoms must be present in early childhood (but may not become fully manifest until social demands exceed limited capacities)

    D.    Symptoms together limit and impair everyday functioning. 

    Severity Levels for ASD

    Severity Level for ASD

    Social Communication

    Restricted Interests & repetitive behaviors

    Level 3 

    ‘Requiring very substantial support’

    Severe deficits in verbal and nonverbal social communication skills cause severe impairments in functioning; very limited initiation of social interactions and minimal response to social overtures from others.  

    Preoccupations, fixated rituals and/or repetitive behaviors markedly interfere with functioning in all spheres.  Marked distress when rituals or routines are interrupted; very difficult to redirect from fixated interest or returns to it quickly.

    Level 2 

    ‘Requiring substantial support’

    Marked deficits in verbal and nonverbal social communication skills; social impairments apparent even with supports in place; limited initiation of social interactions and reduced or abnormal response to social overtures from others.

    RRBs and/or preoccupations or fixated interests appear frequently enough to be obvious to the casual observer and interfere with functioning in a variety of contexts.  Distress or frustration is apparent when RRB’s are interrupted; difficult to redirect from fixated interest.

    Level 1

    ‘Requiring support’

    Without supports in place, deficits in social communication cause noticeable impairments.  Has difficulty initiating social interactions and demonstrates clear examples of atypical or unsuccessful responses to social overtures of others.  May appear to have decreased interest in social interactions. 

    Rituals and repetitive behaviors (RRB’s) cause significant interference with functioning in one or more contexts.  Resists attempts by others to interrupt RRB’s or to be redirected from fixated intere


  • JP-StrongForTwo
    December 5, 2012 at 2:24 PM

    but be careful and make sure you KNOW this ahead of time. because i didnt know this, and they DX'd my daughter with aspergers, and it should have been autism. 

    Quoting ZsMommy:

    the division of asperger's to HFA is speech delays-My daughter has speech and comprehension delays-and is catagorized with an autism diagnosis in order to cover services. Those with an asperger's diagnosis have actually been denied services because they are considered "too" high functioning-meaning no speech delays. Mainly social skills.

    So no-Aspergers has not equalled more services. Too many have been denied.

    Asperger's and HFA have always been divided simply on whether there are speech or no speech delays. It's a thin gossamer thread of division. One allowed services-the other not.

    This would even the qualifications.

    Quoting ForeverInLove:

    Wouldn't children with Asperger's then have more help? As, I would think children with Autism would qualify for more therapy and help, vs. children with high functioning autism (aspergers)... I might be misunderstanding all of this.



  • ZsMommy
    by ZsMommy
    December 5, 2012 at 3:02 PM

    But if there will be no DX of Asperger's going forward-strictly just a diagnosis of autism,I don't foresee how this will cause a problem.

    Flat out-across the board. Autism.

    I'm figuring they obviously will still recognize level/degree of severity. But with a flat out "blanket" diagnosis-they can't deny those who are higher functioning,but still in need of some services.

    Quoting JP-StrongForTwo:

    but be careful and make sure you KNOW this ahead of time. because i didnt know this, and they DX'd my daughter with aspergers, and it should have been autism. 

    Quoting ZsMommy:

    the division of asperger's to HFA is speech delays-My daughter has speech and comprehension delays-and is catagorized with an autism diagnosis in order to cover services. Those with an asperger's diagnosis have actually been denied services because they are considered "too" high functioning-meaning no speech delays. Mainly social skills.

    So no-Aspergers has not equalled more services. Too many have been denied.

    Asperger's and HFA have always been divided simply on whether there are speech or no speech delays. It's a thin gossamer thread of division. One allowed services-the other not.

    This would even the qualifications.

    Quoting ForeverInLove:

    Wouldn't children with Asperger's then have more help? As, I would think children with Autism would qualify for more therapy and help, vs. children with high functioning autism (aspergers)... I might be misunderstanding all of this.




  • ZsMommy
    by ZsMommy
    December 5, 2012 at 3:07 PM

    Considered-to a degree. Many school districts currently deny services based on Asperger's being catagorized as "higher functioning"

    just because one did not have speech delays,it doesn't mean they do not need extra help in other areas. Some school districts refuse to understand this. That is where the problem truly lies-not so much in the medical community,but in the area of schools and services.

    Schools will acknowlege "autism" but many have flat out denied children help simply because they were labeled "asperger's" and not "autism"

    Quoting kailu1835:

    Aspergers has always been considered to be on the autism spectrum, so I doubt this will have any affect.


  • JP-StrongForTwo
    December 5, 2012 at 3:26 PM

    oh yeah totally. i was responding to the speech delay in autism and forgot about the DSM5 lol. i am actually REALLY excited about this change.  ive been waiting for it for several years 

    Quoting ZsMommy:

    But if there will be no DX of Asperger's going forward-strictly just a diagnosis of autism,I don't foresee how this will cause a problem.

    Flat out-across the board. Autism.

    I'm figuring they obviously will still recognize level/degree of severity. But with a flat out "blanket" diagnosis-they can't deny those who are higher functioning,but still in need of some services.

    Quoting JP-StrongForTwo:

    but be careful and make sure you KNOW this ahead of time. because i didnt know this, and they DX'd my daughter with aspergers, and it should have been autism. 

    Quoting ZsMommy:

    the division of asperger's to HFA is speech delays-My daughter has speech and comprehension delays-and is catagorized with an autism diagnosis in order to cover services. Those with an asperger's diagnosis have actually been denied services because they are considered "too" high functioning-meaning no speech delays. Mainly social skills.

    So no-Aspergers has not equalled more services. Too many have been denied.

    Asperger's and HFA have always been divided simply on whether there are speech or no speech delays. It's a thin gossamer thread of division. One allowed services-the other not.

    This would even the qualifications.

    Quoting ForeverInLove:

    Wouldn't children with Asperger's then have more help? As, I would think children with Autism would qualify for more therapy and help, vs. children with high functioning autism (aspergers)... I might be misunderstanding all of this.





  • mypbandj
    December 5, 2012 at 4:04 PM

    My son has aspergers. I don't see how it will affect anything for us.

  • Dominosmommy
    December 5, 2012 at 5:22 PM

    Wait. Dyslexia is a form of Austism??

  • camoprincess87
    December 5, 2012 at 5:36 PM

    i dont know anyone with aspergers but i still worry about their care.   praying it is fir the best

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