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rhodaj
Mental Illness FACTS AND NUMBERS from Nami
by rhodaj
rho
October 9, 2013 at 10:07 AM

 3

Numbers of Americans Affected by Mental Illness 
• One in four adults−approximately 61.5 million Americans−experience mental illness in a given year. One in 17−about 13.6  million−live  with a serious mental illness such as schizophrenia, major depression or bipolar disorder.1 • Approximately 20 percent of youth ages 13 to 18 experience severe mental disorders in a given year. For  ages 8 to 15, the estimate is 13 percent.2 • Approximately 1.1 percent of American adults— about 2.6 million people—live with schizophrenia.3,4 • Approximately 2.6 percent of American adults−6.1 million people−live with bipolar disorder.4,5 • Approximately 6.7 percent of American adults−about 14.8 million people−live with major depression.4,6 • Approximately 18.1 percent of American adults−about 42 million people−live with anxiety disorders, such as panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), generalized anxiety disorder and phobias.4,7 • About 9.2 million adults have co-occurring mental health and addiction disorders.8 • Approximately 26 percent of homeless adults staying in shelters live with serious mental illness  and an  estimated 46 percent live with severe mental illness and/or substance use disorders.9 • Approximately 20 percent of state prisoners and 21 percent of local jail prisoners have “a recent history” of  a mental health condition.10 • Seventy percent of youth in juvenile justice systems have at least one mental health condition and at least   20 percent live with a severe mental illness.11 Getting Mental Health Treatment in America 
• Approximately 60 percent of adults12, and almost one-half
of youth ages 8 to 15 with a mental illness received no mental health services in the previous year. 13 • African American and Hispanic Americans used mental health services at about one-half the rate of whites in the past year and Asian Americans at about one-third the rate.14. • One-half of all chronic mental illness begins by the age of 14; three-quarters by age 24.15 Despite effective treatment, there are long delays−sometimes decades−between the first appearance of symptoms and when people get help.16 The Impact of Mental Illness in America 
• Serious mental illness costs America $193.2 billion in lost earnings per year.17 • Mood disorders such as depression are the third most common cause of hospitalization in the U.S. for both youth and adults ages 18 to 44.18 • Individuals living with serious mental illness face an increased risk of having chronic medical conditions.19 Adults living with serious mental illness die on average 25 years earlier than other Americans, largely due to treatable medical conditions.20 • Over 50 percent of students with a mental health condition age 14 and older who are served by special education drop out−the highest dropout rate of any disability group.21 • Suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in the U.S.  (more common than homicide) and the third leading cause of death for ages 15 to 24 years.22 More than 90 percent of those who die by suicide had one or more mental disorders.23 • Although military members comprise less than 1 percent of the U.S. population24, veterans represent 20 percent of suicides nationally. Each day, about 18 veterans die from suicide.25

Replies

  • gonecrazi
    October 9, 2013 at 10:40 AM

     Some of these numbers are scary.

  • lancet98
    October 9, 2013 at 11:01 AM

     

    Because.....?

    It really depends on how you define 'mental illness'.

    By the broadest definition, yeah, 1/4 of people will experience some sort of 'mental illness' during their entire life.   But that may be a situational depression or something that is treated with brief counseling.   That doesn't really fit the image of 'mental illness' that most people have.  

     It's all in how you define it.

    For me, when someone says 'mental illness', I usually think of the more disabling conditions, like severe depression, bipolar, schizophrenia, and more severe forms of OCD.   'Mental illness' to me, means something that requires a lot more intense help than a walk in the park and a yoga class.   Things you'd go to a psychiatrist for and that last a long time.

    And with those disorders, it's about 1% of the population that has schizophrenia, about 1% has bipolar disorder, etc.  

    If a person says 'mental disorder', then that makes me think of a much wider range of problems, like a personality disorder, milder depression.

    But no matter what you call it, mental health problems exist on a 'sliding scale', from very mild to very severe.   Slightly disabling to totally disabling.   Anything from a lady who works full  time and is grieving over her mom's cancer and her less than helpful husband, to a blind, developmentally handicapped person with severe schizophrenia.   One might need nothing more than some kind encouragement from a counselor - the opposite end ot the scale is complete 24 hour care, medication and residential lifelong treatment.   THAT is a pretty wide span!

    The reason NAMI uses the statistics and definitions it does, is that NAMI represents ALL people with ALL forms of mental disturbances, whether they are temporary and mild or much more severe.   NAMI tries to work toward the needs of that entire group.

    So for example, they are fighting for better insurance coverage for any people with any type of mental health issue.  For heaven's sake, even if you were just distraught over a relative dying in a car accident, your health insurance you pay for at work won't sufficiently cover it- most provide for no more than a few visits with a counselor.

    The insurance changes would affect millions of people who have mild disorders.   But it would also help the few who have the much more severe forms of mental illness.

    They work for change that will help all people with any type of mental disorder, from mild/temporary to more long term.   So of course, they use statistics that cover ALL forms of mental health issues.

     

    Quoting gonecrazi:

     Some of these numbers are scary.

     

     

  • rhodaj
    by rhodaj
    rho
    October 9, 2013 at 12:36 PM

    Yes NAMI tries to work with all mental illness for insurance changes but when you are in a peer to peer class with 20 people that all have a mental illness then the number is high. That is just one class that isn't the other classes that NAMI does. That's excluding there family to family for members that have a mental illness. Connections for which there could be more then 100 people in one group plus the numerous recovery groups they have for after there classes. They also have there groups that have more then 300 people in one. 

    So I guess I am saying NAMI doesn't talk to much about a light depression and there is in the new books grievence depression because it is an actual disorder now. 

  • lancet98
    October 9, 2013 at 6:41 PM

     Yes, understood.   The peer to peer and family to family classes are usually full of people who have (or whose loved ones have) the more severe mental illnesses.

    But NAMI is still inclusive of all levels of mental illness and meant to benefit all with any degree of illness, and so are the stats you posted.

    Schizophrenia occurs in about 1% of people.   Bipolar, about the same.   Yet altogether, all forms of mental illness....yeah....it involves a lot of people.

    But the point of the statistics is that mental illness of any type can strike anyone, and that we all need to be working toward improving our mental health care in America.  


    Quoting rhodaj:

     

    So I guess I am saying NAMI doesn't talk to much about a light depression and there is in the new books grievence depression because it is an actual disorder now. 


     

  • rhodaj
    by rhodaj
    rho
    October 11, 2013 at 10:44 AM

     Yes I will go through my old post and repost it about the grieving one. It is way back in the post so it will take me a little time to find it.

    Quoting lancet98:

     Yes, understood.   The peer to peer and family to family classes are usually full of people who have (or whose loved ones have) the more severe mental illnesses.

    But NAMI is still inclusive of all levels of mental illness and meant to benefit all with any degree of illness, and so are the stats you posted.

    Schizophrenia occurs in about 1% of people.   Bipolar, about the same.   Yet altogether, all forms of mental illness....yeah....it involves a lot of people.

    But the point of the statistics is that mental illness of any type can strike anyone, and that we all need to be working toward improving our mental health care in America.  

     

    Quoting rhodaj:

     

    So I guess I am saying NAMI doesn't talk to much about a light depression and there is in the new books grievence depression because it is an actual disorder now. 

     

     

     

  • rhodaj
    by rhodaj
    rho
    October 11, 2013 at 11:06 AM

    When Grief Becomes a Mental Illness. This will be added in DSMV in 2013 

     

    According to a study conducted by the National Institute of Mental Health, an estimated 26 percent of Americans live with some type of mental illness. (Read Utne's coverage of America's mental health crisis here.) The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-or more commonly the DSM-dictates how the entire body of medical professionals diagnose mental illnesses. Thus, changes to the manual affect the lives of thousands of people. The fifth version of the DSM is due out in 2013, and the expected changes to the psychological definition of grief, reports Scientific American, are evoking intense controversy

    Specifically, the DSM-V would change our understanding of grief in two important ways. First, the manual introduces a new diagnosis dubbed "complicated grief disorder," which entails "powerful pining for the deceased, great difficulty moving on, a sense that life is meaningless, and bitterness or anger about the loss" past six months after the death. More controversially, the new version of the DSM will allow depression therapy as early as the first few weeks after experiencing a loss. (Currently, doctors and psychologists must wait until two months have passed since the death.)

    Eventually we all suffer crippling grief; it's a universal facet of the human condition. Then most of us overcome that grief. The proposed changes to the DSM-V make it easier for typical grief to be conflated with depression or diagnosed as abnormal.

    Critics of the DSM change worry that grief will be overdiagnosed and exploited by pharmaceutical companies. "There will be vitriolic debates when the public fully appreciates the fact that the DSM is pathologizing the death of a loved one within two weeks," grief researcher Holly G. Prigerson told Scientific American. On the other hand, professionals like Kenneth S. Kendler of the DSM-V Mood Disorder Work Group, who claim that "on the basis of scientific evidence, [mourners are] just like anybody else with depression," argue withholding depression treatment is professionally unfair.

    The article concludes: "In many ways, parsing the differences between normal grief, complicated grief and depression reflects the fundamental dilemma of psychiatry: Mental disorders are diagnosed using subjective criteria and are usually an extension of a normal state." Those probably aren't very reassuring words to someone on the precipice of despair.

    Source: Scientific American

    Quoting rhodaj:

     Yes I will go through my old post and repost it about the grieving one. It is way back in the post so it will take me a little time to find it.

    Quoting lancet98:

     Yes, understood.   The peer to peer and family to family classes are usually full of people who have (or whose loved ones have) the more severe mental illnesses.

    But NAMI is still inclusive of all levels of mental illness and meant to benefit all with any degree of illness, and so are the stats you posted.

    Schizophrenia occurs in about 1% of people.   Bipolar, about the same.   Yet altogether, all forms of mental illness....yeah....it involves a lot of people.

    But the point of the statistics is that mental illness of any type can strike anyone, and that we all need to be working toward improving our mental health care in America.  

     

    Quoting rhodaj:

     

    So I guess I am saying NAMI doesn't talk to much about a light depression and there is in the new books grievence depression because it is an actual disorder now. 

     

     

     

     

  • lancet98
    October 11, 2013 at 4:17 PM

     Grief was not made a mental illness.

    It is not an Axis I disorder.

     

    Quoting rhodaj:

    When Grief Becomes a Mental Illness. This will be added in DSMV in 2013 

     

    According to a study conducted by the National Institute of Mental Health, an estimated 26 percent of Americans live with some type of mental illness. (Read Utne's coverage of America's mental health crisis here.) The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-or more commonly the DSM-dictates how the entire body of medical professionals diagnose mental illnesses. Thus, changes to the manual affect the lives of thousands of people. The fifth version of the DSM is due out in 2013, and the expected changes to the psychological definition of grief, reports Scientific American, are evoking intense controversy

    Specifically, the DSM-V would change our understanding of grief in two important ways. First, the manual introduces a new diagnosis dubbed "complicated grief disorder," which entails "powerful pining for the deceased, great difficulty moving on, a sense that life is meaningless, and bitterness or anger about the loss" past six months after the death. More controversially, the new version of the DSM will allow depression therapy as early as the first few weeks after experiencing a loss. (Currently, doctors and psychologists must wait until two months have passed since the death.)

    Eventually we all suffer crippling grief; it's a universal facet of the human condition. Then most of us overcome that grief. The proposed changes to the DSM-V make it easier for typical grief to be conflated with depression or diagnosed as abnormal.

    Critics of the DSM change worry that grief will be overdiagnosed and exploited by pharmaceutical companies. "There will be vitriolic debates when the public fully appreciates the fact that the DSM is pathologizing the death of a loved one within two weeks," grief researcher Holly G. Prigerson told Scientific American. On the other hand, professionals like Kenneth S. Kendler of the DSM-V Mood Disorder Work Group, who claim that "on the basis of scientific evidence, [mourners are] just like anybody else with depression," argue withholding depression treatment is professionally unfair.

    The article concludes: "In many ways, parsing the differences between normal grief, complicated grief and depression reflects the fundamental dilemma of psychiatry: Mental disorders are diagnosed using subjective criteria and are usually an extension of a normal state." Those probably aren't very reassuring words to someone on the precipice of despair.

    Source: Scientific American

    Quoting rhodaj:

     Yes I will go through my old post and repost it about the grieving one. It is way back in the post so it will take me a little time to find it.

    Quoting lancet98:

     Yes, understood.   The peer to peer and family to family classes are usually full of people who have (or whose loved ones have) the more severe mental illnesses.

    But NAMI is still inclusive of all levels of mental illness and meant to benefit all with any degree of illness, and so are the stats you posted.

    Schizophrenia occurs in about 1% of people.   Bipolar, about the same.   Yet altogether, all forms of mental illness....yeah....it involves a lot of people.

    But the point of the statistics is that mental illness of any type can strike anyone, and that we all need to be working toward improving our mental health care in America.  

     

    Quoting rhodaj:

     

    So I guess I am saying NAMI doesn't talk to much about a light depression and there is in the new books grievence depression because it is an actual disorder now. 

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • B3autiful_Hat3
    October 11, 2013 at 6:11 PM

    Wow, who knew.

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