Moms with Teens

fantasticfour
Depression and Self Esteem Issues
April 19, 2013 at 2:01 PM
I have a question for all you moms out there. Remember when we were teenagers? When we were kids? How come we didn't have a ton of depressed kids with self esteem issues? I wasn't popular BY FAR in my school, in fact I was an outcast for most of it. But I didn't have depression or self esteem issues. Did you? Honestly? How come all the time, whenever a teenager is broody or moody or acts out in any way, most people point it to self esteem or depression begging the parent to take the child to counseling? Have we become the generation of parents that don't teach their children coping skills or to be responsible for their actions?

Replies

  • fantasticfour
    April 23, 2013 at 2:07 PM

     Perhaps you misunderstood the entire post and perhaps I didn't make it very clear to anyone.  I actually posted this days ago and never even saw it and couldn't find it when I went looking for it again.

    First of all, let me express my condolences that you had to go through all of that as a child.  You would have to be the exception to the rule in everything on this, because you actually had tramatic experiences that would have left any sane person with depression, self esteem issues, and a multitude of other problems. 

    The question at hand is not for those who have legitimate reasons for being depressed.  They are for your average every day teenager who doesn't have a poor life.  Who are offered many things life has that are positive.  Such as the students around here, who are given cars, loved by their parents, are popular, participate in sports, and make good grades.  Yet they are the ones with self esteem problems and depression.

    Quoting sabrtooth1:

    You are WAAAY outta line.  I'm 60 years old.  I was depressed and had self esteem issues as a kid, all the way into my 20's.  MANY other kids I knew, were depressed & had self esteem issues.  My FATHER committed suicide 50 years ago.  My uncle committed suicide 70 years ago, as did my aunt about 40 years ago.  My mother and my grandmother were depressed.  My mother-in-law was depressed and bulimic, and died from the bulimia.  My brother-in-law was bipolar, and died because he was too depressed to continue getting treatment for a severe health condition.  Suicide by neglect. 

    40 years ago, when I first graduated college, I began working in the group health insurance industry.  I continued in that field for 20 years.  When I started, many insurance plans did not have mental health coverage.  MOST group health plans that DID have coverage, SPECIFICALLY DENIED treatment for ADHD, drug addiction, alcoholism, autisim, Aspergers, Tourette's and other "soft' disorders.  It is only in the last 15-20 years that more people have insurance coverage for mental health disorders. 

    So altho these disorders have been RAMPANT for generations, there were not a lot of options for treatment.

    The sin now, is that there are STILL people who refuse to acknowledge these disorders, especially in their children, leaving them in anguish, failure, and with alcohol & drug addiction caused by self-medication.  Suicide is the THIRD leading cause of death among 15-25 year olds.  The first two are auto accident, and homicide.  And a number of THOSE deaths were precipitated by depression, and other emotional disorders.  The sin, is that this is ALL so treatable.

     

  • sabrtooth1
    April 23, 2013 at 3:05 PM

     

     

    Quoting fantasticfour: The question at hand is not for those who have legitimate reasons for being depressed.  They are for your average every day teenager who doesn't have a poor life.  Who are offered many things life has that are positive.  Such as the students around here, who are given cars, loved by their parents, are popular, participate in sports, and make good grades.  Yet they are the ones with self esteem problems and depression.

    You are the one who misunderstands.  You misunderstand depression.

    "Substantial evidence from neuroscience, genetics, and clinical investigation shows that depressive illnesses are disorders of the brain. ... Modern brain imaging technologies reveal that, in depression, neural circuits responsible for the regulation of moods, thinking, sleep, appetite, and behavior fail to function properly, and critical neurotransmitters­, chemicals that brain cells use to communicate, ­are out of balance.  Studies of brain chemistry ... continue to inform our understanding of the biochemical processes involved in depression." 

    "Like most people, you probably assume preschoolers are too young to get the blues. But new research shows clinical depression knows no age. Depression - and even thoughts of suicide - are as likely to affect toddlers and adolescents as they are adults. Co-morbidty is a very important determining factor. In most studies, nearly all of the cases of pediatric depression also have another co-morbid diagnosis. This is in the same range as adults.  

    In an ongoing National Institute of Mental Health study, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine revealed that children experience the same symptoms of depression often found in adults, and with the same severity.

    Children are more depressed than ever before, prompting a major Surgeon General report on children's mental health, and sending our nation's behavioral health caseload soaring to record highs.

    According to the National Mental Health Association, one in three American children suffers from depression. Magellan Behavior Health, the leading mental health provider in the United States, reports that more than 3,500 of its nearly 149,000 members with depressive disorders, are under age 10.

    In spite of the staggering statistics, depression remains the most under-diagnosed and under-treated illness among children and adolescents.

    http://psychcentral.com/lib/2006/even-toddlers-get-the-blues/all/1/

     What happens to depressed children? 

    In many cases, it disappears. About 90 % of the time it is gone within one year. Sometimes it disappears without any treatment at all. That is the good news.

    The bad news is that depression in children is recurrent.  That is, even after a child recovers, he or she is much more likely to get depressed again.  About 35 % will get again meet criteria for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD)  within a year from recovering.  By two years, half of the children who recovered will have had a recurrence of their depression.  About 75% of children will have a recurrence of their depression within four years of their first episode.  Each time depression recurs, it makes it that much more likely that it will recur again.

    If nothing is done, the picture can be quite bleak.  Ten to fifteen years later, 7.7% will have committed suicide.  They are five times more likely to attempt suicide (without dying).  They are twice as likely to get another episode of depression.  Only 37% will have made it to adulthood without getting depressed again. This makes depression one of the most serious medical problems that a teenager can have, and one of the most lethal.  It also should encourage all of us to identify and treat teenagers with depression so that they do not end up as a statistic.

    http://jamesdauntchandler.tripod.com/depression/depressionpamphlet.htm

  • Barabell
    April 24, 2013 at 1:29 PM

    Depression is irrational. Just because you have those things, it doesn't mean you can't become depressed.

    Quoting fantasticfour:

    The question at hand is not for those who have legitimate reasons for being depressed.  They are for your average every day teenager who doesn't have a poor life.  Who are offered many things life has that are positive.  Such as the students around here, who are given cars, loved by their parents, are popular, participate in sports, and make good grades.  Yet they are the ones with self esteem problems and depression.


  • Momabear455
    April 24, 2013 at 1:46 PM

    Kids these days have alot of stress on their plates. Times  have changed and kids are being forced to grow up too fast these days.  They have alot more on their plates.  Everything has a name nowadays, they had the same symptoms of people long ago they just didn't  have the fancy names.  For example Bi-Polar

  • fantasticfour
    April 24, 2013 at 11:44 PM

     I never said different.  My thing is is that those with everything seem to be the ones with the self esteem issues and the depression.

    Quoting Barabell:

    Depression is irrational. Just because you have those things, it doesn't mean you can't become depressed.

    Quoting fantasticfour:

    The question at hand is not for those who have legitimate reasons for being depressed.  They are for your average every day teenager who doesn't have a poor life.  Who are offered many things life has that are positive.  Such as the students around here, who are given cars, loved by their parents, are popular, participate in sports, and make good grades.  Yet they are the ones with self esteem problems and depression.

     

     

  • sabrtooth1
    April 25, 2013 at 12:32 AM



    Quoting fantasticfour:

     I never said different.  My thing is is that those with everything seem to be the ones with the self esteem issues and the depression.

    It's not that OTHER kids don't have problems too, it's that the kids with loving, educated parents, in well off circumstances, are the ones who get diagnosed and  treated.   The other kids get ignored, are told to suck it up, or are told "You are old enough, and smart enough.  You SHOULD be able to..."

  • Barabell
    April 25, 2013 at 9:56 AM

    Sometimes when other people view you as having "everything going for you," it puts that person under a high amount of pressure not to mess things up. High amounts of stress can lead to depression.

    Depression is very common in both sides of my family, especially with the family members that have higher education. Two of my family members have been/are professors, and both of them have suffered from depression. I have come to learn that professors seem to be at higher risk for depression.

    Again, depression can be IRRATIONAL--meaning that just because other people view the depressed individual to "have everything" it doesn't diminish their illness.

    Quoting fantasticfour:

     I never said different.  My thing is is that those with everything seem to be the ones with the self esteem issues and the depression.

    Quoting Barabell:

    Depression is irrational. Just because you have those things, it doesn't mean you can't become depressed.

    Quoting fantasticfour:

    The question at hand is not for those who have legitimate reasons for being depressed.  They are for your average every day teenager who doesn't have a poor life.  Who are offered many things life has that are positive.  Such as the students around here, who are given cars, loved by their parents, are popular, participate in sports, and make good grades.  Yet they are the ones with self esteem problems and depression.


     


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